1920s

Maybe you missed these first time around?

Spiraled by Kendra Elliot

FBI Special Agent Ava McLane solves crimes; she doesn't witness them. When she's trapped in a mall without her weapon as a shooter picks off victims, she hides with a wounded teen and prays for her survival. But that's only the beginning... An epidemic of mass shootings has swept across Oregon. The young shooters terrify the public, committing random murders before taking their own lives. The task force assembled to solve the case--which includes Ava's boyfriend, detective Mason Callahan--remains stumped. And on top of this chaos, Ava's troubled twin sister reappears, throwing Ava's already-tumultuous life into a tailspin. An old-fashioned cop with a strong sense of duty, Mason struggles to find the cause of the shootings as workaholic Ava spins ever closer to breaking down. But can one detective save the lives of countless innocents--and prevent the woman he loves from going over the edge?.

A ring of truth by Michelle Cox

In this second book of the series, Henrietta and Clive delightfully rewrite Pride and Prejudice --with a hint of mystery! Newly engaged, Clive and Henrietta now begin the difficult task of meeting each other's family. "Difficult" because Clive has neglected to tell Henrietta that he is in fact the heir to the Howard estate and fortune, and Henrietta has just discovered that her mother has been hiding secrets about her past as well. When Clive brings Henrietta to the family estate to meet his parents, they are less than enthused about his impoverished intended. Left alone in this extravagant new world when Clive returns to the city, Henrietta finds herself more at home with the servants than his family, much to the disapproval of Mrs. Howard--and soon gets caught up in the disappearance of an elderly servant's ring, not realizing that in doing so she has become part of a bigger, darker plot. As Clive and Henrietta attempt to discover the truth in the two very different worlds unraveling around them, they both begin to wonder: Are they meant for each other after all?

Fire in the stars by Barbara Fraser Fradkin

A former aid worker returns home haunted by her time in Africa and channels her pain into a murder investigation that's all too personal. After surviving a horrific trauma in Nigeria, international aid worker Amanda Doucette returns to Canada to rebuild her life and her shaken ideals. There, the once-passionate, adventurous woman needs all her strength and ingenuity when a friend and fellow survivor goes missing along with his son. A trained first-aid and crisis responder, Doucette -- always accompanied by her beloved dog Kaylee -- joins forces with RCMP officer Chris Tymko to discover the truth about the disappearance. Their search leads them to the Great Northern Peninsula, a rugged landscape of Viking history, icebergs, whales, and fierce ocean storms. Elsewhere, a body gets hauled up in a fisherman's net, and evidence is mounting of an unsettling connection with Amanda's search for her friend. Fradkin writes evocatively of the beautiful, often hostile, Newfoundland landscape where Amanda soon finds herself fighting for her very survival.
 

Mapp and Lucia by E. F. Benson

 Lucia, recently widowed, is the newcomer to the village of Tilling and eager to wrest the reins of social supremacy from the incumbant Miss Mapp and install herself as its benevolent dictator. In their polite acts of sabotage and ruthless jockeying for the position of cultural arbiter Mapp and Lucia tear up the conventions of drawing-room bridge evenings as their deadly weapons. Things finally come to a head with Miss Mapp's audacious attempt to steal her rival's celebrated Lobster a la Riseholme. E.F. Benson's charming satrical bent turns the pretensions and snobberies of English village life into a vicious comedy.

Merry Hall by Beverley Nichols

First in a trilogy, Merry Hall is the account of the restoration of a house and garden in post-war England. Though Mr. Nichols's horticultural undertaking is serious, his writing is high-spirited, riotously funny, and, at times, deliciously malicious.

Few aristocratic English families of the twentieth century enjoyed the glamorous notoriety of the infamous Mitford sisters. Nancy Mitford's most famous novels, The Pursuit of Love and Love in a Cold Climate, satirize British aristocracy in the twenties and thirties through the amorous adventures of the Radletts, an exuberantly unconventional family closely modelled on Mitford's own. The Radletts of Alconleigh occupy the heights of genteel eccentricity, from terrifying Lord Alconleigh (who, like Mitford's father, used to hunt his children with bloodhounds when foxes were not available), to his gentle wife, Sadie, their wayward daughter Linda, and the other six lively Radlett children. Mitford's wickedly funny prose follows these characters through misguided marriages and dramatic love affairs, as the shadow of World War II begins to close in on their rapidly vanishing world.

May We Suggest: Historical Mysteries

Second Street Station: a Mary Handley mystery by Lawrence H. Levy

The empty mirror: a Viennese mystery by J. Sydney Jones

A duty to the dead by Charles Todd

The Mangle Street murders by M.R.C. Kasasian

Damsel in distress by Carola Dunn

The devil's making by Seán Haldane

Canton Seniors Book Discussion: November 21, 2013

Canton Seniors Book Discussion group will meet on Thursday, November 21 at 2:00-3:00 PM in Group Study Room A. (Note: We are meeting 1 week earlier. The library will be closed on Thanksgiving Day, November 28.) Copies of the book are distributed at the meeting or request a copy at the Adult Help Desk. No registration required. This month we are discussing:

The Paris wife: a novel by Paula McLain.  Portrays the love affair and marriage between Ernest Hemingway and Hadley Mowrer from their Chicago meeting in 1920 to their lives during the Jazz Age in Paris, but as Ernest struggles to find his literary voice, Hadley tries to define her role in their relationship as wife, friend, and muse

Sleuth It: Dead & Done VIII

Historical mysteries let the reader be picked up and be transported to different times and places. A good story is a painless way to get into the period, and, if it features a unsolved crime or two, give a look at history’s darker underside.

Sweet poison by David Roberts

Christine Falls: a novel by Benjamin Black

The day the music died: a mystery by Ed Gorman

The hell screen by I.J. Parker

Shadow trade by Alan Furst

Murder Will Out March 2013

Antiques disposal by Barbara Allan

A killer in the wind by Andrew Klavan

Least of evils: a Percy Peach mystery by J.M. Gregson

Looking for yesterday by Marcia Muller

The old gray wolf by James D. Doss

Unnatural habits: a Phryne Fisher mystery by Kerry Greenwood

Time was, Time is… February 2012

Murder Will Out - Agatha Christie Read-Alikes

If you like mysteries where all of the main characters are stuck in some kind of confined environment (a large, scary, old house) trying to solve some kind of crime or love the Agatha Christie novels when Poirot dramatically explains the crime's solution at the end of his books to the group of suspects, should enjoy these authors/characters:

Margery Allingham's Albert Campion 

Carolyn Hart's Henrie O'

M. C. Beaton's Agatha Raisin 

Ngaio Marsh's Inspector Alleyn 

Susan Kandel's Cece Caruso

Alexander McCall Smith's No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency

David Roberts' Verity Browne & Lord Edward Corinth

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