May We Suggest?

May We Suggest?This blog provides customized book recommendations to our patrons. To get your own, just fill out the May We Suggest form and you can expect results within 10 days. You can also like May We Suggest on facebook.

In a time when discussions of race are once again coming to the fore, the event that launched the civil rights movement -- the 1955 lynching of a fourteen-year-old black boy named Emmett Till -- is now reexamined by an award-winning author with access to never-before-heard accounts from those involved as well as recently recovered court transcripts from the trial..

"After seven years of misery and abuse, Hannah O'Malley is officially divorced with full custody of her five-year-old daughter. With the help of her close-knit circle of friends--including her high school crush, Travis Wilson--Hannah begins turning her spacious old house into a safe house for other women who've endured the pain she's known"--.

To begin Connect Your Summer this year, you will receive a StoryBox. After that, it's up to you. Below are a few books to help you think about what exactly you might do with that box.

When a girl receives a beautiful porcelain box from her grandmother, she immediately wants something special to put inside it. What does she love best? She loves jumping in puddles on rainy days, blowing bubbles in the park, and watching her little sister's first steps. Life's most precious treasures cannot be contained in a box! Features a sparkly die-cut star on the cover, and flaps throughout reveal hidden surprises.

What to do with a box by Jane Yolen

Jane Yolen poetically reminds young readers that a simple box can be a child's most imaginative plaything as artist Chris Sheban illustrates its myriad and magical uses.

Also available in: video

On a day when everything goes wrong for him, Alexander is consoled by the thought that other people have bad days too.

The ant bully by John Nickle
Also available in: video

Lucas learns a lesson about bullying when he is pulled into the ant hole he has been tormenting.

Five electrical appliances find that their young owner has disappeared. The toaster takes charge, rounding up the vacuum cleaner, the electric blanket, bedside lamp and radio. Together they take off for the big city in search of their master. Based on the book by Thom Demijohn.

Not sure which superhero is the most awesome? Check out these great reads and have fun finding out!

At the airport, Eugene bumps into Fun E. Racer, disguised as a flight attendant, who intends to stop him from going on vacation.

When George and Harold hypnotize their principal into thinking that he is the superhero Captain Underpants, he leads them to the lair of the nefarious Dr. Diaper, where they must defeat his evil robot henchmen.

Books to Enjoy

Ducklings by Marfe Ferguson Delano

Introduces wood ducks, describing their life cycle, physical characteristics, diet, and behaviors.

Make way for ducklings by Robert McCloskey

A family of mallard ducks searches for a new home in Boston.

May 29 marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of John F. Kennedy. Learn more about our 35th president by checking out some of the Library's many resources.

Originally released in the UK on May 26, 1967, this year marks the 50th anniversary of the Beatles' landmark album. The U.S. release was on June 1.

A riveting look at the transformative year in the lives and careers of the legendary group whose groundbreaking legacy would forever change music and popular culture. They started off as hysteria-inducing pop stars playing to audiences of screaming teenage fans and ended up as musical sages considered responsible for ushering in a new era. The year that changed everything for the Beatles was 1966-- the year of their last concert and their first album, Revolver, that was created to be listened to rather than performed. This was the year the Beatles risked their popularity by retiring from live performances, recording songs that explored alternative states of consciousness, experimenting with avant-garde ideas, and speaking their minds on issues of politics, war, and religion. 

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