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May We Suggest

May We Suggest?This blog provides customized book recommendations to our patrons. To get your own, just fill out the May We Suggest form and you can expect results within 10 days. You can also like May We Suggest on facebook.

New Books on the Biography Shelf

Daughter of empire: my life as a Mountbatten by Lady Pamela Hicks

Jim Henson: the biography by Brian Jay Jones

Johnny Carson by Henry Bushkin

My story by Elizabeth Smart with Chris Stewart

Native American Heritage Month

birdIn 1990, President George H.W. Bush declared the month of November as "National American Indian Heritage Month", which has come to be commonly referred to as Native American Heritage Month. By either name it is a time of "recognition for the significant contributions the first Americans made to the establishment and growth of the U.S." The Library's collection is a great place to look for materials about Native Americans and their place in our country's history.

500 nations: an illustrated history of North American Indians by Alvin M. Josephy, Jr. ; based on a documentary filmscript by Jack Leustig, Roberta Grossman, Lee Miller, and William Morgan with contributions by John M.D. Pohl

The Cambridge history of the native peoples of the Americas

Daily life of Native Americans from post-Columbian through nineteenth-century America by Alice Nash and Christoph Strobel

Canton Seniors Book Discussion Group January-June 2014

Looking for a lively book discussion? The Canton Seniors Book Discussion Group meets on the fourth Thursday of the month from 2:00-3:00PM in Group Study Room A at Canton Public Library. 

January 23              Annie's Ghosts: A Journey into a Family's Secret by Steve Luxenberg

February 27           The Closers by Michael Connelly

March 27                Detroit: An American Autopsy by Charlie LeDuff

April 24                   The Sandcastle Girls by Chris Bohjalian

May 22                     Crank by Ellen Hopkins

June 26                    The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery

Gunfight at the O.K. Corral

It was on October 26, 1881 in Tombstone, Arizona that the infamous gunfight took place. Generally regarded as the most famous gunfight in the history of the American West, it is believed to have lasted all of thirty seconds. On one side were the cowboy outlaws Billy Clairborne, Ike and Billy Clanton, and Tom and Frank McLaury. Opposing them were Marshall Virgil Earp and his brothers Morgan and Wyatt, as well as Doc Holliday. Hollywood versions of the gun battle can be found in the films My Darling Clementine (1946), Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957) and Tombstone (1993). Find out what the fight was really all about and who survived by checking out some of the following books and dvds from the Library's collection:

The last gunfight: the real story of the shootout at the O.K. Corral and how it changed the American West by Jeff Guinn

And die in the West: the story of the O.K. Corral gunfight by Paula Mitchell Marks

British Historical Dramas

Three recent television dramas draw on British history for their inspiration. The White Queen, airing on Starz, is based on Philippa Gregory's historical novels about the Wars of the Roses - The White Queen, The Red Queen, and The Kingmaker's Daughter. PBS's The Hollow Crown combines four of Shakespeare's plays to tell the story of three kings who shaped English history - Richard III, Henry IV, and Henry V. The new CW series Reign chronicles the life of the teenage Mary, Queen of Scots. Enhance your viewing experience with some historical background on both the people and the events by checking out some of these titles from the Library's collection:

Blood sisters: the women behind the Wars of the Roses by Sarah Gristwood

Lancaster against York: the Wars of the Roses and the foundation of modern Britain by Trevor Royle

The Wars of the Roses by Alison Weir

Lunch & a Book November 2013

On Thursday November 14 at noon, we will be discussing:

The Paris wife: a novel by Paula McLain — Hadley Richardson is a quiet twenty-eight-year-old who has all but given up on love and happiness-until she meets Ernest Hemingway. Following a whirlwind courtship and wedding, the pair set sail for Paris, where they become the golden couple in the fabled Lost Generation. Though deeply in love, the Hemingways are ill prepared for the hard-drinking and fast-living life of Jazz Age Paris. Surrounded by beautiful women and competing egos, Ernest struggles to find the voice that will earn him a place in history, pouring all the richness and intensity of his life with Hadley and their circle of friends into the novel that will become The Sun Also Rises. Hadley, meanwhile, strives to hold on to her sense of self as the demands of life with Ernest grow costly and her roles as wife, friend, and muse become more challenging.

Canton Seniors Book Discussion: November 21, 2013

Canton Seniors Book Discussion group will meet on Thursday, November 21 at 2:00-3:00 PM in Group Study Room A. (Note: We are meeting 1 week earlier. The library will be closed on Thanksgiving Day, November 28.) Copies of the book are distributed at the meeting or request a copy at the Adult Help Desk. No registration required. This month we are discussing:

The Paris wife: a novel by Paula McLain.  Portrays the love affair and marriage between Ernest Hemingway and Hadley Mowrer from their Chicago meeting in 1920 to their lives during the Jazz Age in Paris, but as Ernest struggles to find his literary voice, Hadley tries to define her role in their relationship as wife, friend, and muse

Cuban Missile Crisis Anniversary

Last year marked the 50th anniversary of one of the most pivotal moments of the Cold War. For 13 days in October 1962, the United States and the former Soviet Union engaged in a political and military standoff over the installation of nuclear-armed Soviet missiles in Cuba — just 90 miles off the U.S. coast. President John F. Kennedy notified the country about the presence of the missiles in an historic television address on October 22, 1962. It was during this speech that he explained his decision to enact a naval blockade around Cuba. Because of this many, people believed the world was on the brink of nuclear war. Disaster was averted, however when Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev agreed to remove the missiles in exchange for the U.S. not invading Cuba, and also removing U.S. missiles from Turkey. The confrontation was officially ended on October 28, 1962.

Maximum danger: Kennedy, the missiles, and the crisis of American confidence by Robert Weisbrot

One minute to midnight: Kennedy, Khrushchev, and Castro on the brink of nuclear war by Michael Dobbs