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If you missed our Music Storytime this week, don't worry. Here are some of the stories and songs from this week's storytime, plus some suggestions to inspire a storytime that will get your toes tapping at home. 

From Storytime

Hiccupotamus by Steve Smallman

The jungle animals are having a musical celebration! Mouse squeaks, Bird tweets, and Centipede taps his feet. Then more animals hear the music and want to join in, as Monkey, Warthog, and Crocodile bring their own music-making talents to the group. But what is that silly Hippo doing?

 

FIVE LITTLE DRUMS (Built on the framework of one of my favorite fingerplays):

     Five little drums making music at the show (hold up 5 fingers)

     One fell down and started to... ROLL! (roll your hands)

     It bounced offstage and landed with a BOOM.

     How many drums are left in the room? (repeat until all the drums have rolled away)

 

If you missed our Gray Storytime this week, don't be blue. Here are some of the stories and songs from this week's storytime, plus some suggestions to inspire a colorful storytime that you can do at home. 

From Storytime

My body is tough and gray by Joyce L Markovics

Similar to the Guess What series, this book offers a series of clues for the reader to solve.

I dream of an elephant by Ami Rubinger

Elephants of many colors are described in couplets that invite the reader to complete the rhyme using color-themed clues.

Thanksgiving is fast approaching, but any time of year is a good time to stop and be thankful for what we have. Check out these picture books for tales of gratitude that can be enjoyed all year long.

Attitude of gratitude by Julie Andrews

It's Gratitude Day at school! Gerry is ready to be grateful and kind all day long. She's excited to give her best compliments, she's donated a beautiful painting to her class's art gallery, and she even has the perfect jar contribution ready for the food drive. But when disaster strikes, it's tough to stay grateful--even on Gratitude Day! Can Gerry prove that a fairy princess always has the right attitude of gratitude?

A celebration of how the body's parts work together, from hands and eyes to lips and heart, allowing one to exist in the wondrous universe. Includes instructions for making a book.

Thank you for me! by Marion Dane Bauer

In this lyrical text, a young child lists body parts from nose to toes, giving thanks for each along the way.  A subtle reminder of our deepest core values, Thank You for Me! is a delightful celebration of gratitude.
 

Little Bear and Thorndyke

Hey Kids,

Sometimes the world is a rough place, so I'm taking a minute today to remind myself to be kind to others. It can be hard to show kindness when we're feeling angry or scared, but nothing makes me feel better than finding something nice to do for someone else. So if you're looking for books that might help you show understanding or compassion to someone who needs it, these are some of my favorite. I hope they inspire you, too. If you have your own inspiring books, please share them as a comment below.

Bear Hugs,

Thorndyke

Wolfie the bunny by Ame Dyckman

When her parents find a baby wolf on their doorstep and decide to raise him as their own, Dot is certain he will eat them all up until a surprising encounter with a bear brings them closer together.

Chrysanthemum by Kevin Henkes
Also available in: audiobook | e-audiobook | video | e-video

Chrysanthemum loves her name, until she starts going to school and the other children make fun of it.

Large print is not just a bigger font size that makes reading accessible for the visually impaired. It’s also proven to improve letter and word recognition, aid reading comprehension, and increase feelings of confidence and satisfaction when reading. That makes it perfect for beginning or reluctant readers and ESL/ELL students. Large print books are an essential resource for any literacy program.

Art restorer, assassin, and spy Gabriel Allon finds himself poised to become the chief of Israel's secret intelligence service, but not before answering the French government's request to eliminate the person responsible for detonating a massive bomb in Paris.

Blood orange [large print] by Susan Wittig Albert

"In the newest China Bayles Mystery in the New York Times bestselling series, China comes to the aid of a nurse who ends up in the hospital... It's mid-April in Pecan Springs, and China is renting her guest cottage to Kelly Kaufman, who needs a temporary place to live as she contends with a very acrimonious divorce from her husband, Rich. One nasty point of dispute is her part ownership of the Comanche Creek Brewing Company, which she is refusing to sell. At the same time, as a nurse employed by a local hospice, Kelly has discovered instances of suspicious practices. Even more disturbing, she suspects that a patient was murdered. Kelly's knowledge could be dangerous, and she wants to get guidance from China on what to do. But on her way to China's house, Kelly is forced off the road and critically injured, putting her in a medically induced coma. Now it's up to China to determine who wanted her out of the picture. Was it her soon-to-be ex? His new lover--who happens to be the sister of China's friend Ruby? Or someone connected with the corruption at the hospice? China owes it to her friend to uncover the truth--but she may be putting her own life at risk.."--.

"As the dreary, bitter weather of late fall descends on Minneapolis, Detective Nikki Liska is restless, already bored with her new assignment to the cold case squad. She misses the rush of pulling an all-nighter and the sense of urgency of hunting a desperate killer on the loose. Most of all she misses her old partner, Sam Kovac. Kovac is having an even harder time adjusting to Liska's absence, saddled with a green new partner younger than most of Sam's wardrobe. But Kovac is distracted from his troubles by an especially brutal double homicide: a prominent university professor and his wife, bludgeoned and hacked to death in their home with a ceremonial Japanese samurai sword. Liska's case--the unsolved murder of a decorated sex crimes detective--is less of a distraction: Twenty five years later, there is little hope for finding the killer who got away. Meanwhile, Minneapolis resident Evi Burke has a life she only dreamed of as a kid in and out of foster homes: a beautiful home, a family, people who love her, a fulfilling job. But a danger from her past is stalking her idyllic present. A danger bent on destroying the perfect life she was never meant to have. As the trails of two crimes a quarter of century apart twist and cross, Kovac and Liska race to find answers before a killer strikes again.".

British Library Crime Classics presents forgotten classics from the golden age of British crime writing. Neglected and left languishing, many of these titles haven’t been seen in print since before the Second World War. With covers as iconic and collectible as the works themselves, these are a period delight."

Death in the tunnel by Miles Burton

"On a dark November evening, Sir Wilfred Saxonby is travelling alone in the 5 o'clock train from Cannon Street, in a locked compartment. The train slows and stops inside a tunnel; and by the time it emerges again minutes later, Sir Wilfred has been shot dead, his heart pierced by a single bullet. Suicide seems to be the answer, even though no reason can be found. Inspector Arnold of Scotland Yard thinks again when he learns that a mysterious red light in the tunnel caused the train to slow down. Finding himself stumped by the puzzle, Arnold consults his friend Desmond Merrion, a wealthy amateur expert in criminology. To Merrion it seems that the dead man fell victim to a complex conspiracy―but the investigators are puzzled about the conspirators' motives, as well as their identities. Can there be a connection with Sir Wilfred's seemingly untroubled family life, his highly successful business, or his high-handed and unforgiving personality? And what is the significance of the wallet found on the corpse, and the bank notes that it contained?"--.

Antidote to venom by Freeman Wills Crofts

George Surridge, director of the Birmington Zoo, is a man with many worries: his marriage is collapsing; his finances are insecure; and an outbreak of disease threatens the animals in his care. As Surridge's debts mount and the pressure on him increases, he begins to dream of miracle solutions. But is he cunning enough to turn his dreams into reality - and could he commit the most devious murder in pursuit of his goals? This ingenious crime novel, with its unusual 'inverted' structure and sympathetic portrait of a man on the edge, is one of the greatest works by this highly respected author.

Duchlan Castle is a gloomy, forbidding place in the Scottish Highlands. Late one night the body of Mary Gregor, sister of the laird of Duchlan, is found in the castle. She has been stabbed to death in her bedroom - but the room is locked from within and the windows are barred. The only tiny clue to the culprit is a silver fish's scale, left on the floor next to Mary's body.Inspector Dundas is dispatched to Duchlan to investigate the case. The Gregor family and their servants are quick - perhaps too quick - to explain that Mary was a kind and charitable woman. Dundas uncovers a more complex truth, and the cruel character of the dead woman continues to pervade the house after her death. Soon further deaths, equally impossible, occur, and the atmosphere grows ever darker. Superstitious locals believe that fish creatures from the nearby waters are responsible; but luckily for Inspector Dundas, the gifted amateur sleuth Eustace Hailey is on the scene, and unravels a more logical solution to this most fiendish of plots.Anthony Wynne wrote some of the best locked-room mysteries from the golden age of British crime fiction. This cunningly plotted novel - one of Wynne's finest - has never been reprinted since 1931, and is long overdue for rediscovery.
 

From the author of A. Lincoln, a major new biography of one of America's greatest generals--and most misunderstood presidents In his time, Ulysses S. Grant was routinely grouped with George Washington and Abraham Lincoln in the "Trinity of Great American Leaders." But the battlefield commander-turned-commander-in-chief fell out of favor in the twentieth century. In American Ulysses, Ronald C. White argues that we need to once more revise our estimates of him in the twenty-first.  Grant was not only a brilliant general but also a passionate defender of equal rights in post-Civil War America. After winning election to the White House in 1868, he used the power of the federal government to battle the Ku Klux Klan. He was the first president to state that the government's policy toward American Indians was immoral, and the first ex-president to embark on a world tour, and he cemented his reputation for courage by racing against death to complete his Personal Memoirs . 

Also available in: e-book

We may love books, but do we know what lies behind them? In The Book, Keith Houston reveals that the paper, ink, thread, glue, and board from which a book is made tell as rich a story as the words on its pages--of civilizations, empires, human ingenuity, and madness. In an invitingly tactile history of this 2,000-year-old medium, Houston follows the development of writing, printing, the art of illustrations, and binding to show how we have moved from cuneiform tablets and papyrus scrolls to the hardcovers and paperbacks of today. Sure to delight book lovers of all stripes with its lush, full-color illustrations, The Book gives us the momentous and surprising history behind humanity's most important--and universal--information technology.

"While working at the Newark Star-Ledger, Matt Zoller Seitz and Alan Sepinwall created a popular column debating the merits of then-current television. Eventually they went on to successful careers as critics elsewhere, but the debate raged on and now comes to an epic conclusion in TV (THE BOOK). Alan and Matt have established The Pantheon of top TV shows using a complex, obsessively all-encompassing ranking system by which to order and stack them up against each other. With a mix of lively entries on critically acclaimed and commercially successful classics such as Seinfeld, The Sopranos, Star Trek, The Simpsons and Twin Peaks and illuminating essays on short-lived favorites such as Taxi, Freaks and Geeks, and My So-Called Life, TV (THE BOOK) is sure to spark conversation and debate among readers. TV (THE BOOK) is a must-have for long-time television and film buffs and for young enthusiasts who, fresh off their latest Netflix binge, are looking to expand their knowledge of the medium and wondering what show to start streaming next"--.

Graced by the Huron River with an abundance of parks, Ann Arbor offers residents and visitors entertainment, sports, shopping, dining, and of course, the University of Michigan. Legendary Locals of Ann Arbor celebrates its citizens. Some of those who make up Ann Arbor are creative artists, inspiring educators, dedicated public servants, and determined business owners. With the exception of Lewis the cat, who reigned at Downtown Home and Garden, this book is filled with stories about people who have made and are making Ann Arbor one of the best places to live in the United States. Within its pages lie the stories of who chose maize and blue as the University of Michigan's colors; who was the first Ann Arborite to race in the Indy 500; and who sold Tom Monaghan, founder of Domino's, his first pizzeria. Inside are photographs and descriptions of the legendary people of the past and the present, as well as those who are on their way to becoming the legends of the future.

If you already love our OverDrive e-books and e-audiobooks, you'll have more to love when the site undergoes a major update on November 2. If you haven't tried our OverDrive e-books recently, take a new look. Not only is the OverDrive website updating, we are filling it with more great new titles than ever before. If you're curious about the updates, look at what's new, or try out the preview on OverDrive

 

If you missed our Leaf Storytime this week, don't worry. Here are some of the stories and songs from this week's storytime, plus some suggestions to inspire a fall storytime that you can do at home. 

From Storytime

In a simple, evocative conversation with nature, a young girl witnesses how the season changes from summer to autumn.

 

THE LEAVES ON THE TREES (to The Wheels on the Bus)

     The leaves on the trees turn orange and brown… all over town.

     The leaves on the trees come tumbling down… all over town.

     The leaves on the ground go swish, swish, swish… all over town.

     The leaves on the ground get raked right up… all over town.

     The trees all around are bare and cold… all over town.

     The trees show the seasons go round and round… all over town.

The United Nations is celebrating 2016's World Space Week from Oct. 4-10th. Check out some of these picture books dealing with the moon, the stars, aliens, and astronauts.

A young child thinks about what it would be like to be an astronaut and go out on a mission into space. The book uses actual terminology, such as gravity, orbit, and satellite, in easy to read, simple sentences paired with colorful drawings.

Goodnight moon by Margaret Wise Brown

A little bunny bids goodnight to all the objects in his room before falling asleep.

Written by an astronaut, a small but plucky mouse named Mike is sure that he can help the Space Shuttle astronauts, and ends up saving the whole mission. Includes facts about NASA and space travel. His adventures continue in the sequel Mousetronaut Goes to Mars.

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