May We Suggest?

May We Suggest?This blog provides customized book recommendations to our patrons. To get your own, just fill out the May We Suggest form and you can expect results within 10 days. You can also like May We Suggest on facebook.

 

Did you miss our Spider Storytime this week? Don't worry, here's what you missed, plus a few more suggestions to inspire a buggy storytime you can do at home.

From Storytime

If I'm Trying to Love Spiders doesn't cure your spider phobia, it'll at least make you appreciate how amazing they are...and laugh a lot as you learn about them.

These graphic novels have inspired some of your favorite films and TV shows in the 21st century.

The death of Stalin by Fabien Nury

Currently in theaters starring Steve Buscemi and Jeffrey Tambor.

I kill giants by Joe Kelly
Also available in: e-book

Coming to DVD soon!

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. on April 4, 1968.

On April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. was fatally shot as he stood on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis. At the time of his murder, King was a polarizing figure -- scorned by many white Americans, worshipped by some African Americans and liberal whites, and deemed irrelevant by many black youth. In The Heavens Might Crack, historian Jason Sokol traces the diverse responses, both in America and throughout the world, to King's death. Whether celebrating or mourning, most agreed that the final flicker of hope for a multiracial America had been extinguished. A deeply moving account of a country coming to terms with an act of shocking violence.

National Poetry Month Biographies

Celebrate National Poetry Month by getting to know more about the lives of some of our greatest poets:
 

Longfellow: a rediscovered life by Charles C. Calhoun

 

 

Yeats's ghosts: the secret life of W.B. Yeats by Brenda Maddox

 

 

 

 

Dylan Thomas: a new life by Andrew Lycett

 

 

 

 

From noon to starry night: a life of Walt Whitman by Philip Callow

 

 

 

 

Thorndyke the Bear's Foot

 

Hey Kids,

Misty Copeland has been chosen as the honorary chair for National Library Week. Mark your calendars for April 8-14, because it will be a great week to celebrate our fabulous library. Misty Copeland is an accomplished ballet dancer and author, so she knows a lot about telling a good story in many different ways. I've included some suggestions below, some books about interesting dancers and of course, those by Misty Copeland herself.

Enjoy your National Library Week celebrations. Bear Hugs,

Thorndyke

Nonfiction

A lot can happen in 24 hours! Check out a book that takes place over the course of a day or night. 

Before I fall by Lauren Oliver

After she dies in a car crash, teenaged Samantha relives the day of her death over and over again until, on the seventh day, she finally discovers a way to save herself.

Dope sick by Walter Dean Myers

Seeing no way out of his difficult life in Harlem, seventeen-year-old Jeremy "Lil J" Dance flees into a house after a drug deal goes awry and meets a weird man who shows different turning points in Lil J's life when he could have made better choices.

 

If you enjoyed reading about Luciana Vega, the American Girl character who goes to Space Camp, you might be interested in these titles.

 

Fiction

I love you, Michael Collins by Lauren Baratz-Logsted

In 1969, as her own family is falling apart, ten-year-old Mamie finds comfort in conducting a one-sided correspondence with the least famous astronaut heading toward the moon on Apollo 11.

World Water Day is celebrated every year on March 22 to focus attention on the importance of water throughout the globe. Water issues are especially important in Michigan with our abundant supply of, and easy access to, fresh water. Here are a few facts from the United Nations and a list library materials to help you learn more about the world's most precious resource.

Did you know that...

  • 2/3 of natural wetlands have disappeared since 1900?
  • 1.9 billion people live in areas where water is already scarce?
  • 2.1 billion people have no safely-managed drinking water services?
  • 80% of all the world's wastewater flows back into rivers and oceans without treatment?
  • Restoring ecosystems creates jobs in areas like recreation, fishing, forestry, and agriculture? 

Wars of the future will be fought over water, as they are today over oil, as the source of all life enters the global marketplace and political arena. Corporate giants, private investors, and corrupt governments vie for control of our dwindling fresh water supply, prompting protests, lawsuits, and revolutions from citizens fighting for the right to survive. Past civilizations have collapsed from poor water management. Will ours too?

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