May We Suggest

May We Suggest?This blog provides customized book recommendations to our patrons. To get your own, just fill out the May We Suggest form and you can expect results within 10 days. You can also like May We Suggest on facebook.

Leave blank for all. Otherwise, the first selected term will be the default instead of "Any".
Leave blank for all. Otherwise, the first selected term will be the default instead of "Any".
Leave blank for all. Otherwise, the first selected term will be the default instead of "Any".

Introducing new mysteries by new authors...

Speakers of the dead by J. Aaron Sanders

The year is 1843, the place, New York City. When reporter Walt Whitman's friend is hanged for the murder of her husband - a crime she did not commit - Walt vows to exonerate her. With the help of her estranged boyfriend, the two men uncover a link between body-snatching and the murder: a man called Samuel Clement. To get to Clement, Walt and Henry descend into a dangerous underworld where men steal the bodies of the recently deceased and sell them to medical colleges. A vibrant re-imagining of one of America's most beloved literary figures.
 

Dig two graves by Kim Powers

Ethan Holt won the decathlon at the Olympics and was jokingly nicknamed "Hercules"; now, in his late thirties, he's returned to his ivy-covered alma mater to teach, and to raise his young daughter Skip as a single father. After a hushed-up scandal over his Olympics win and the death of his wife in a car accident five years ago, Ethan wants nothing more than to forget his past. Skip is not only the light of Ethan's life--she is his life. Then, Skip is kidnapped. A series of bizarre ransom demands start coming in that stretch Ethan's athletic prowess to its limits, and he realizes with growing horror that they are modern versions of the Twelve Labors of Hercules, demanded in tricky, rhyming clues by someone who seems to have followed every step of Ethan's career.

Former Police Chief Katherine Sullivan has been called brilliant, brave, compassionate, and quirky, but after decades of crime fighting, this resilient grandmother with an artist's soul is discovering that retirement can be just as deadly as being on the job. When Katherine returned to her hometown, her only thought was to comfort her recently divorced daughter. That was before a young woman was found murdered on the estate of the town's richest family. Now, in order to track down the killer, Katherine must uncover the generations of secrets that at least one person as already killed to protect in this charming and smart series debut, The Fine Art of Murder .
 

Getting enough sleep helps you stay healthy and alert. Many older people don’t sleep well, but getting older doesn’t mean you have to feel tired all the time. There are many things you can do to help you sleep better:

  • Follow a regular sleep schedule. Go to sleep and get up at the same time each day, even on weekends.
  • Develop a bedtime routine. Take time to relax before bedtime each night.
  • Exercise at regular times each day but not within 3 hours of your bedtime.

Neuroscientist Penny Lewis explores the latest research into the nighttime brain to understand the real benefits of sleep, showing how, while our body rests, the brain practices tasks it learned during the day, replays traumatic events to mollify them, and forges connections between distant concepts.

Meditation can be described as the exercise of quieting the mind, and The Little Sleep Meditation is an innovative compilation of short, guided meditations aimed at relaxing and soothing the listener into a complete state of calmness to aid a good night's sleep. It is suited to both beginners and advanced meditators and features music by Llewellyn from his bestselling album Sleep Gold. Philip Permutt, acclaimed healer, author, and meditation expert, also includes detailed sleeve notes about working with the sleep meditations on the CD.

National Poetry Month Biographies

Celebrate National Poetry Month by getting to know more about the lives of some of our greatest poets:
 

Longfellow: a rediscovered life by Charles C. Calhoun

 

 

Yeats's ghosts: the secret life of W.B. Yeats by Brenda Maddox

 

 

 

 

Dylan Thomas: a new life by Andrew Lycett

 

 

 

 

From noon to starry night: a life of Walt Whitman by Philip Callow

 

 

 

 

Rough magic: a biography of Sylvia Plath by Paul Alexander

 

 According to the latest Nielsen stats, the average American adult spends 11 hours per day with electronic media. Digital eye strain occurs after two or more hours of digital device use. Tech addicts would be well-served to give their eyes a rest with the easy-reading large print format.  Check out the newest releases now available in Large Print.

Channeling his inner Easy Rider, Serge Storms saddles up for his most epic, lethal, and hilarious road trip ever as he revvs off to find the lost American Dream . . . starting in the Florida Panhandle. Obsessed with the iconic Sixties classic Easy Rider, encyclopedic Floridaphile, lovable serial killer, and movie buff extraordinaire Serge A. Storms devises his wildest plan yet: finish the journey begun by his freewheeling heroes, Captain America and Billy, tragically cut short by some shotgun-wielding rednecks. Setting a course for the Florida panhandle, Captain Serge--with Coleman literally riding shotgun--mounts his classic motorcycle and hits the highway in search of the real America: the apple-pie-eating, freedom-swilling moms and pops of Main Street USA. But the America he finds in the rural burgs dotting the neck of the peninsula is a little bit different . . . and a whole lot weirder than anything Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper encountered. In a state where criminal politicians are more common than gators, Serge and Coleman discover one particular speed-trap locale so aggressively inept at corruption that investigators are baffled where to start. Expect nothing less than madness, mayhem, ingenious homicides, and mind-altering pharmaceuticals when Serge and Coleman's path intersects with the Sunshine State's hyper-dysfunctional rusticity. Where's Jack Nicholson when you need him?
 

"Brilliant, irascible and frequently frustrating to both his friends and his long-suffering bosses, John Rebus has made the dark places of Edinburgh his home for over two decades. The Beat Goes On collects all of Ian Rankin's Rebus short stories for the first time, including two never-before published tales written specifically for this collection. From his beginnings as a young Detective Constable in "Dead and Buried," right up to his dramatic, but not quite final, retirement in "The Very Last Drop," Rebus shines in these stories, confirming his status as one of crime fiction's most compelling, brilliant, and unforgettable characters. In these gripping, fast-paced tales, the legendary Scottish detective investigates the sinister cases that are his specialty, including a gruesome student death, the brutal murder of a woman at the crux of a love triangle, an audacious jewel heist, suspicious happenings at a nursing home, and an ominous email that brings a family's darkest secrets to light" -- provided by publisher.

Chronicles the events of 1944 to reveal how nearly the Allies lost World War II, citing the pivotal contributions of FDR, Churchill, and Stalin.

Michigan author Joseph Heywood will visit the Adrian District Library on Saturday, April 23, at 1:00 p.m.

Heywood is the author of the Woods Cop mystery series featuring Conservation Officer Grady Service.  Buckular Dystrophy, the tenth book in the series, was released March 1.  In addition to being an author, Heywood is a photographer, artist, cartoonist and poet.  

Following Heywood’s presentation there will time for questions and book signing.  Copies of his new book will be available to purchase.

March is Women's History Month. Find out about the many brave and talented women who have influenced world history by reading some of these titles from the Library's collection:

Spyglass : an autobiography by Hélène Deschamps

In 1876 Sophia Duleep Singh was born into Indian royalty. Her father, Maharajah Duleep Singh, was heir to the Kingdom of the Sikhs, one of the greatest empires of the Indian subcontinent. It was a territory irresistible to the British, who plundered everything. Exiled to England, the dispossessed Maharajah transformed his estate in Suffolk into a Moghul palace. Sophia, god-daughter of Queen Victoria, was raised a genteel aristocratic Englishwoman and presented at court. But then, in secret defiance of the British government, she travelled to India, and returned a revolutionary, devoting herself to battling injustice and inequality. Her causes were the struggle for Indian Independence,  the welfare of Indian soldiers in the First World War--and, above all, the fight for female suffrage.

Spring is just around the corner, so get yourself ready by checking out some of these great picture books all about the season!

And then it's spring by Julie Fogliano

Simple text reveals the anticipation of a boy who, having planted seeds while everything around is brown, fears that something has gone wrong until, at last, the world turns green.

Bunny bunny catkin by Cathy MacLennan

Celebrates the joys of spring with illustrations, rhythmic text, and fun-to-imitate sounds.

Finding spring by Carin Berger

Too excited to hibernate through his first winter, a bear cub tries to find spring.

March is Women's History Month. Find out about the many brave and talented  women who have influenced world history by reading some of these titles from the Library's collection:

Presents profiles of war heroines from Germany, Poland, France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark, Great Britain, and the United States.

The story of Temple Grandin, an autistic young woman who became a great success story in the field of livestock science.

Film adaptation of the musical play which is the story of the poor Argentine girl who came to the city, became an actress and then a politician's mistress, and then the president's wife.

Dramatization of the life of Joan of Arc centering on her trial and execution.

Born in Boston, MA, in 1932, Plath developed a talent as a writer and published her first poem when she was eight years old. That same year, Plath was forced to confront the unexpected death of her father. In 1950, she began studying at Smith College on a literary scholarship. In 1955, she was granted a Fulbright Scholarship to study in England at Cambridge. There, Plath met Ted Hughes, a respected author. The two fell in love, and married in 1958. However, marriage, family, and a growing reputation as an important poet failed to bring Plath happiness.

Check out a female-directed movie for Women's History Month. 

Jacob runs a struggling orphanage in one of India's poorest regions. Desperate to save an orphanage from closing, he returns to Denmark to meet Jorgen, a wealthy businessman and potential benefactor. What appears to be nothing more than a friendly gesture to attend a wedding sets in motion an increasingly devastating series of surprises, revelations, and confessions that will forever change their lives.

Fiona and Grant are an Ontario couple who have been married for over 40 years. During the twilight of their years, Grant is forced to face the fact that Fiona's 'forgetfulness' actually is Alzheimer's. After Fiona wanders away and is found, the decision is made for her to go into a nursing home. For the first time in their relationship, they are forced to undergo a separation since this is the nursing home 'no-vistors,' first 30 days policy of a patient's stay. When Grant visits Fiona after the orientation period, he is devastated to find out that not only has she seemingly forgotten him, but she has transferred her affections to another man. As the distance between husband and wife grows, Grant must draw upon his love for Fiona to perform an act of self-sacrifice in order to ensure her happiness.

A teenager in 1970s San Francisco begins an affair with her mother's boyfriend.

Pages