Catalog

Search our Catalog

May We Suggest

May We Suggest?This blog provides customized book recommendations to our patrons. To get your own, just fill out the May We Suggest form and you can expect results within 10 days. You can also like May We Suggest on facebook.

If You Like Alice Hoffman...

If you like Alice Hoffman may we suggest...

A bigamist's daughter by Alice McDermott

Buster Midnight's Cafe by Sandra Dallas


Echo by Francesca Lia Block



Flight behavior: a novel by Barbara Kingsolver

The round house by Louise Erdrich

The flight of Gemma Hardy: a novel by Margot Livesey

The mercy rule by Perri Klass

The beginner's goodbye: a novel by Anne Tyler

Adult Contemporary Book Discussion November 17

Please join the Adult Contemporary Book Discussion Group on Monday, November 17 at 7:00 PM in the Community Room to discuss:

The kitchen house by Kathleen Grissom. After seven-year-old Lavinia is orphaned on the journey from Ireland to the United States, she begins work in the kitchen house of a tobacco plantation and bonds with the slaves who become her adopted family, but when Lavinia is accepted into the big house, her loyalties are challenged.

What We're Reading: October 2014

Lately, I've been reading non-fiction. A well-written narrative not only informs, it entertains.  Did you know Canton Public Library has a new book discussion group?  The Nonfiction Book Group will meet the third Saturday of the month.  Their first meeting is November 15 at 10:00 AM.

The First World War in 100 objects by John Hughes-Wilson ; IWM consultant, Nigel Steel ; editor, Mark Hawkins-Dady

The history of rock 'n' roll in ten songs by Greil Marcus

Music in the shadows: noir musical films by Sheri Chinen Biesen

Seven elements that changed the world: an adventure of ingenuity and discovery by John Browne

In the kingdom of ice: the grand and terrible polar voyage of the USS Jeannette by Hampton Sides

The Great Chicago Fire

The Great Chicago Fire burned from Sunday, October 8 to Tuesday, October 10, 1871. The fire started in or around a barn on DeKoven Street, but despite the fact that the O'Leary family lived in the area, the legend of Mrs. O'Leary's cow kicking over a lantern is probably just that - a legend. More than 300 people died in the fire, 100,000 were left homeless, and four square miles of the city were destroyed. Although the Chicago fire, perhaps, the most well known from in American history, there have been significant fires in other major cities as well - Boston, Pittsburgh and Detroit included. To learn more about them check out Seven Fires: the Urban Infernos that Shaped America.

The great fire by Jim Murphy

Smoldering city: Chicagoans and the Great Fire, 1871- 1874 by Karen Sawislak

City of the century: the epic of Chicago and the making of America by Donald L. Miller

City of big shoulders: a history of Chicago by Robert G. Spinney

Italian-American Heritage Month

About 5.5 million Italians immigrated to the United States between 1820 and 2004. The greatest surge occurred between 1880 and 1920 when more than 4 million Italians came to America. October is the time to celebrate the many achievements and contributions of Americans of Italian descent in all walks of life.

Adult Contemporary Book Discussion October 20

Please join the Adult Contemporary Book Discussion Group on Monday, October 20 at 7:00 PM in the Community Room to discuss:

Someone by Alice McDermott. We first meet Marie, a bespectacled seven-year old who is standing on the steps of her Brooklyn townhouse waiting for her father. The story of Marie's life enfolds as we follow her through milestones of loss, love, marriage and motherhood.

For Those Who Liked Eragon

The false prince by Jennifer A. Nielsen


Sabriel by Garth Nix


The Amulet of Samarkand by Jonathan Stroud


Dragon keeper by Carole Wilkinson


Dragonflight by Anne McCaffrey


The eye of the world by Robert Jordan


Dragons of autumn twilight by Margaret Weiss and Tracy Hickman ; poetry by Michael Williams ; interior art by Denis Beauvais

California Statehood

California was admitted to the United States on September 9, 1850. Originally colonized by the Spanish in the 17th century, it became part of Mexico in 1821. In 1846, a group of American settlers declared an independent California Repulic shortly after the beginning of the Mexican-American War. The California Gold Rush of 1848 led to a huge increase in Califronia's population and started an economic boom. Some of the many figures connected to the state's rich and complicated history include Sir Francis Drake, Junipero Serra, John Fremont, Leland Stanford, Upton Sinclair, and William Randolph Hearst. Learn more: