May We Suggest

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Spirit bridge [large print] by James L Rubart

The Warriors Riding have achieved staggering success in the spiritual realm, but with the final battle looming, the Warriors' only chance of survival depends on calling for the Spirit Bridge.

As the household of NYPSD Lieutenant Eve Dallas and her billionaire husband Roarke prepares for an invasion of family and friends for Thanksgiving, an ungrateful son decides to stop the nagging from his parents - by ending their lives. Soon Jerald Reinhold is working his way through anyone who has ever thwarted him in his path to an easy life. Eve is increasingly frustrated in her efforts to cover all the potential victims as Jerald stays a terrifying step ahead. As the festivities begin, Eve is desperate to identify which victim on Jerald's long list will be the next, so she can stop the killing spree..

Following his punishment for trying to measure God's greatest gift, Father Time is granted his freedom and is sent on a mission to redeem himself by teaching two earthly people the true meaning of time.

When Colorado carpenter Gary Adams spots two mysterious creatures in the woods near his house, he calls on his friend, veterinarian Cammy Rivers for advice. But like Gary, Cammy has never seen an animal resembling this beautiful species. But when the Department of Homeland Security puts a call out for Gary and Cammy because of these animals, the two risk everything to protect the innocent creatures.

Longlisted for the National Book Award A former Wall Street quant sounds an alarm on the mathematical models that pervade modern life -- and threaten to rip apart our social fabric We live in the age of the algorithm. Increasingly, the decisions that affect our lives--where we go to school, whether we get a car loan, how much we pay for health insurance--are being made not by humans, but by mathematical models. In theory, this should lead to greater fairness: Everyone is judged according to the same rules, and bias is eliminated. But as Cathy O'Neil reveals in this urgent and necessary book, the opposite is true. The models being used today are opaque, unregulated, and uncontestable, even when they're wrong. 

Also available in: e-book | audiobook

The Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Cleopatra , the #1 national bestseller, unpacks the mystery of the Salem Witch Trials. It began in 1692, over an exceptionally raw Massachusetts winter, when a minister's daughter began to scream and convulse. It ended less than a year later, but not before 19 men and women had been hanged and an elderly man crushed to death. The panic spread quickly, involving the most educated men and prominent politicians in the colony. Neighbors accused neighbors, parents and children each other. Aside from suffrage, the Salem Witch Trials represent the only moment when women played the central role in American history. In curious ways, the trials would shape the future republic. As psychologically thrilling as it is historically seminal, THE WITCHES is Stacy Schiff's account of this fantastical story-the first great American mystery unveiled fully for the first time by one of our most acclaimed historians.

Featuring a diverse group of writers, War No More gathers the best of America's vibrant tradition of antiwar and peace literature, essays, letters, speeches, memoirs, poems, stories and songs spanning almost three centuries. It offers an unprecedented view of a powerful and perennially relevant American tradition, encompassing five-star generals, theologians, nuclear physicists, folk singers, signers of the declaration, quietists, anarchists, veterans, and Nobel laureates.
 

With spot-on details and ingenious plot twists, Beverly Connor has been compared to the hottest crime writers on the scene. Now, she ratchets up the suspense with a series featuring a cunning and complex sleuth: forensic anthropologist Diane Fallon. Her new job as director of the RiverTrail Museum of Natural History in Georgia takes Diane out of the game-until a former love and a murdered family bring her back in.
 

It's Talk Like a Pirate Day! If you missed our Pirate-themed Storytime, don't worry. Here are some of the stories and songs from this week's storytime, plus some suggestions to inspire a storytime fit for a scalawag that you can do at home. 

From Storytime

Pig kahuna pirates! by Jennifer Gordon Sattler

Pig brothers Dink and Fergus love playing at the beach, but when Dink wakes up from his nap in a grumpy mood, Fergus invites Dink to play with his new pirate ship of sand and gives him the starring role as pirate captain.

IF YOU'RE A PIRATE AND YOU KNOW IT

(Adapted from If You're Happy and You Know It, and inspired by Born Librarian)

    If you're a pirate and you know it swab the deck (swab, swab)

    If you're a pirate and you know it walk the plank (stomp, stomp)

    If you're a pirate and you know it dig for treasure (dig, dig)

    If you're a pirate and you know it shout "ahoy" ("AHOY!")

Did you miss our courage storytimes this week? Don't worry, here are some of the stories and songs from this week's storytime, plus some suggestions to inspire a brave storytime you can do at home. 

From Storytime

We sang "Silly Bird" to warm up, but Caspar Babypants has a lot of other fun songs!

Flight school by Lita Judge

Little Penguin, who has the "soul of an eagle," and big dreams,  enrolls in flight school.

Did you miss our Pet Storytime at the Farmer's Market last week? Don't worry, here's what you missed, plus a few more suggestions to inspire a cuddly storytime you can do at home.

From Storytime

We tried a few different rhymes and songs. We sang "The Wheels on the Bus," but added noises for all the different pets on the bus (I think the Elephants on the Bus were my favorite). We also acted out this rhyme while making all the appropriate animal noises:

     Can you hop like a rabbit? Can you jump like a frog?

     Can you waddle like a duck? Can you wag like a dog?

     Can you fly like a bird? Can you swim like a fish?

     Can you sit back down and be still like this?

Strictly no elephants by Lisa Mantchev

A boy is excluded from joining his friends' pet club because of his unusual pet.

All the king's men by Robert Penn Warren

Set in the 1930s, this Pulitzer Prize-winning novel traces the rise and fall of demagogue Willie Stark, a fictional character who resembles the real-life Huey "Kingfish" Long of Louisiana. Stark begins his political career as an idealistic man of the people but soon becomes corrupted by success and caught between dreams of service and an insatiable lust for power.

Blindness by José Saramago

With an epidemic of "white blindness" sweeping New York City, the criminal element stalks the city, while one eyewitness leads a group of seven strangers through the afflicted city streets to safety.

Darkness at noon by Arthur Koestler

Set during Stalin’s Moscow show trials of the 1930s, this is an unforgettable portrait of an aging revolutionary who is imprisoned and psychologically tortured by the very political party to which he has dedicated his life.

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

A totalitarian regime has ordered all books to be destroyed, but one of the book burners, Guy Montag, suddenly realizes their merit.

What's a good cozy mystery without humor and recipes?

Kernel of truth by Kristi Abbott

Opening a gourmet popcorn shop was never on Rebecca Anderson's bucket list. But after a failed marriage to a celebrity chef, she's ready for her life to open up and expand. She has returned to her hometown of Grand Lake, Ohio, with her popcorn-loving poodle Sprocket to start a new business:naturally called POPS. As a delicious bonus, Cordelia 'Coco' Bittles, a close family friend who has always been like a grandmother to Rebecca, owns the chocolate shop next door, and the two are thinking of combining their businesses. a But when Coco's niece, Alice, discovers her on the floor of her chocolate shop, those dreams go up in smoke. The local sheriff thinks Coco was the victim of a robbery gone wrong, but Rebecca isn't so sure. As suspects start popping up all over, Rebecca is determined to turn up the heat and bring the killer to justice in a jiffy! a Includes popcorn related recipes! 

White colander crime by Victoria Hamilton

A tourist-trade boon boom means a big turnout for the opening of Queensville Historic Manor and for Jaymie Leighton, food columnist and vintage cookware collector, a chance to promote the manor and give away homemade goodies. At the end of a long day of festival fun, Jaymie discovers the battered body of local woman Shelby Fretter. Shelby predicted her own murder in journal entries--and all clues point to Cody Wainwright, the troubled son of Jaymie's beleaguered newspaper editor. But considering the entire Fretter family had its share of dirty secrets, Jaymie's not convinced by the case against Cody. With twists all over, she's going to have to work like the Dickens to wrap up this investigation before Christmas--especially with the real killer ready to kill again. INCLUDES RECIPES!

Merry market murder by Paige Shelton

Bailey's Farmers' Market is this season's go-to holiday destination, but not all the vendors are feeling the Christmas spirit... Jam and preserve maker Becca Robins is excited about the extra business that the Ridgeway Christmas Tree Farm is bringing to the market this holiday season. But when a competing tree farmer, Reggie Stuckey, arrives with a truck full of trees, angrily barking that he has exclusive selling rights at the market, Becca finds herself pining for more goodwill toward men. After Reggie is found with a tree stake in his chest, she wonders when the Christmas tree business turned so deadly. Now Becca has to use the only clues she has to the killer's identity--mysterious ornaments that begin to show up in her stall--to hook a sinister Scrooge who will go to any lengths to drive home a point...
 

Several major films being released this fall and winter are based on true events. Find out more about them in the Library's collection of books and documentaries.

The Birth of a Nation.  Based on Nat Turner's 1831 slave uprising. Starring Nate Parker, Armie Hammer, Aja Naomi King, and Aunjanue Ellis. Release date October 7. Suggested reading: Nat Turner: a slave rebellion in history and memory and The rebellious slave: Nat Turner in American memory by Scot French.

Deepwater Horizon. Based on the 2010 oil rig explosion off the coast of Louisiana. Starring Mark Wahlberg, Kurt Russell, and Kate Hudson. Release date September 30. Suggested reading: Drowning in oil: BP and the reckless pursuit of profit by Loren C. Steffy. Suggested viewing: The spill.

Denial. Writer and historian Deborah Lipstadt is sued for libel by Holocaust denier David Irving. Starring Rachel Weisz, Andrew Scott, and Timothy Spall. Release date September 30. Suggested reading: History on trial: my day in court with Holocaust denier David Irving by Deborah E. Lipstadt and Denying the Holocaust: the growing assault on truth and memory by Deborah E. Lipstadt, and Lying about Hitler: history, Holocaust, and the David Irving trial by Richard J. Evans.

There is something about a non-fiction book that challenges people to change, to reflect upon their lives, to explore new worlds...

'Grunt' tackles the science behind some of a soldier's most challenging adversaries-- panic, exhaustion, heat, noise-- and introduces us to the scientists who seek to conquer them.

The story of the gene begins in earnest in an obscure Augustinian abbey in Moravia in 1856 where Gregor Mendel, a monk working with pea plants, stumbles on the idea of a "unit of heredity." It intersects with Darwin's theory of evolution, and collides with the horrors of Nazi eugenics in the 1940s. The gene transforms postwar biology. It invades discourses concerning race and identity and provides startling answers to some of the most potent questions coursing through our political and cultural realms. It reorganizes our understanding of sexuality, gender identity, sexual orientation, temperament, choice, and free will, thus raising the most urgent questions affecting our personal realms. Above all, the story of the gene is driven by human ingenuity and obsessive minds-- from Mendel and Darwin to Francis Crick, James Watson, and Rosalind Franklin to the thousands of scientists working today to understand the code of codes. Woven through the book is the story of Mukherjee's own family and its recurring pattern of schizophrenia, a haunting reminder that the science of genetics is not confined to the laboratory but is vitally relevant to everyday lives. The moral complexity of genetics reverberates even more urgently today as we learn to "read" and "write" the human genome-- unleashing the potential to change the fates and identities of our children and our children's children .

Eric Liddell's story as the Olympic gold medalist was told in the Academy Award winning film Chariots of Fire. Liddell would not run on Sunday because of his strict observance of the Christian sabbath, and so he did not compete in his signature event at the 1924 Paris Olympics. Yet Liddell triumped in a new event and won a gold medal. Liddell ran - and lived - for the glory of his God. After the Olympics, he dedicated himself to missionary work in China. He and thousands of other westerners were eventually interned at a Japanese work camp. Once imprisoned, Liddell did what he was born to do, practice his faith and his sport..

Also available in: e-book | e-audiobook | large print

"This is what we long for: the profound pleasure of being swept into vivid new worlds, worlds peopled by characters so intriguing and real that we can't shake them, even long after the reading's done. In his earlier, award-winning novels, Dominic Smith demonstrated a gift for coaxing the past to life. Now, in The Last Painting of Sara de Vos, he deftly bridges the historical and the contemporary, tracking a collision course between a rare landscape by a female Dutch painter of the golden age, an inheritor of the work in 1950s Manhattan, and a celebrated art historian who painted a forgery of it in her youth. In 1631, Sara de Vos is admitted as a master painter to the Guild of St. Luke's in Holland, the first woman to be so recognized. Three hundred years later, only one work attributed to de Vos is known to remain--a haunting winter scene, At the Edge of a Wood, which hangs over the bed of a wealthy descendant of the original owner. An Australian grad student, Ellie Shipley, struggling to stay afloat in New York, agrees to paint a forgery of the landscape, a decision that will haunt her. Because now, half a century later, she's curating an exhibit of female Dutch painters, and both versions threaten to arrive. As the three threads intersect, The Last Painting of Sara de Vos mesmerizes while it grapples with the demands of the artistic life, showing how the deceits of the past can forge the present"--.

Also available in: e-book

Advances in technology are creating the next economy and enabling us to make things/do things/connect with others in smarter, cheaper, faster, more effective ways. But the price of this progress has been a decoupling of the engine of prosperity from jobs that have been the means by which people have ascended to (and stayed in) the middle class. Andy Stern, the former president of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) spent four years traveling the country and asking economists, futurists, labor leaders, CEOs, investment bankers, entrepreneurs, and political leaders to help picture the U.S. economy 25 to 30 years from now. He vividly reports on people who are analyzing and creating this new economy--such as investment banker Steve Berkenfeld; David Cote, the CEO of Honeywell International; Andy Grove of Intel; Carl Camden, the CEO of Kelly Services; and Geoffrey Canada of the Harlem Children's Zone. Through these stories, we come to a stark and deeper understanding of the toll technological progress will continue to take on jobs and income and its inevitable effect on tens of millions of people. But there is hope for our economy and future. The foundation of economic prosperity for all Americans, Stern believes, is a universal basic income. The idea of a universal basic income for all Americans is controversial but American attitudes are shifting. Stern has been a game changer throughout his career, and his next goal is to create a movement that will force the political establishment to take action against something that many on both the right and the left believe is inevitable. Stern's plan is bold, idealistic, and challenging--and its time has come.

n the early nineteenth century, the United States turned its idealistic gaze southward, imagining a legacy of revolution and republicanism it hoped would dominate the American hemisphere. From pulsing port cities to Midwestern farms and southern plantations, an adolescent nation hailed Latin America's independence movements as glorious tropical reprises of 1776. Even as Latin Americans were gradually ending slavery, U.S. observers remained energized by the belief that their founding ideals were triumphing over European tyranny among their "sister republics." But as slavery became a violently divisive issue at home, goodwill toward antislavery revolutionaries waned. By the nation's fiftieth anniversary, republican efforts abroad had become a scaffold upon which many in the United States erected an ideology of white U.S. exceptionalism that would haunt the geopolitical landscape for generations. Marshaling groundbreaking research in four languages, Caitlin Fitz defines this hugely significant, previously unacknowledged turning point in U.S. history.

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