May We Suggest?

May We Suggest?This blog provides customized book recommendations to our patrons. To get your own, just fill out the May We Suggest form and you can expect results within 10 days. You can also like May We Suggest on facebook.

Norman Colin Dexter, OBE  English crime writer known for his Inspector Morse series of novels passed away on March 21, 2017.  The novels were written between 1975-1999 and made into a popular BBC/ITV television series starring John Thaw and Kevin Whately. The TV series debuted in 1988 and ended in 2000 with the spun off series Inspector Lewis debuting in 2006 and most recently Endeavour (a prequel to Inspector Morse) appearing in 2013.

In Episode 1 of the series, Inspector Morse, who never quite finds romance, thinks that at last things will turn out differently. He meets the beautiful Anne Stavely, but it is a love not destined to be when Anne is found hanging from a beam under mysterious circumstances. Morse suspects murder and sets out to discover the truth with the help of Sergeant Lewis.

Last bus to Woodstock by Colin Dexter

This is the first book in the Inspector Morse series, published in 1975.  Beautiful Sylvia Kaye and another young woman had been seen hitching a ride not long before Sylvia's bludgeoned body is found outside a pub in Woodstock, near Oxford. Morse is sure the other hitchhiker can tell him much of what he needs to know. But his confidence is shaken by the cool inscrutability of the girl he's certain was Sylvia's companion on that ill-fated September evening. Shrewd as Morse is, he's also distracted by the complex scenarios that the murder set in motion among Sylvia's girlfriends and their Oxford playmates. To grasp the painful truth, and act upon it, requires from Morse the last atom of his professional discipline. 

In case you missed our Fruits and Veggies storytime at Fresh Thyme this week, don't worry. Here are some of the fun stories and songs we shared, plus some extras to do your own healthy eating storytime at home.

From Storytime

 

IF YOU LIKE CARROTS AND YOU KNOW IT (Adapted from "If you're happy and you know it")

     If you like carrots and you know it, clap your hands.

     If you like carrots and you know it, clap your hands.

     If you like carrots and you know it, and you really want to show it, 

     If you like carrots and you know it, clap your hands.

     (Repeat with: broccoli/stomp your feet; squash/shout hurray; cabbage/dance around)

 

 

NPM Poster

Join us to celebrate National Poetry Month and pick up an activity sheet at one of our reference desks during the month of April. It's a great way to reacquaint yourself with favorite poets or introduce yourself to something new. Don't limit yourself to just April, though. Use our poetry suggestions below to enjoy poetry all year long.

Most poetry books can be found in the nonfiction shelves in the 800s - in the Children's, Teen, or Adult Collection. Other suggestions for exploring poetry are included below. 

 

 

March is Women's History Month! Dive into a novel about young women living fearlessly throughout history. 

Audacity by Melanie Crowder

"A historical fiction novel in verse detailing the life of Clara Lemlich and her struggle for women's labor rights in the early 20th century in New York."--.

Black dove, white raven by Elizabeth Wein

Having moved to Ethiopia to avoid the prejudices of 1930s America, Emilia Menotti, her black adoptive brother Teo, and their mother Rhoda, a stunt pilot, are devoted to their new country even after war with Italy looms, drawing the teens into the conflict.

Everyone has a To Read list, but what do we do with the scads of titles we finished? How do we keep track of them for ourselves, our kids, and to make recommendations to friends? Here are apps that can help you keep track of your titles in fun and accessible ways.

 

Goodreads

Available for free for both the iPhone and Google Android devices, Goodreads can be used as an app and on the computer as well, all with the same login information. Goodreads lets you track both titles you have read and titles you want to read, along with the ability to see what your friends are reading and to be a part of their yearly reading challenge, where you set a goal and try to meet it by the end of each calendar year. 

Google Android App--https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.goodreads&hl=en

Apple Store--https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/goodreads-book-recommendations-and-revie...

 

March is Women's History Month. Find out about the many brave and talented  women who have influenced world history by reading some of these titles from the Library's collection:

Presents profiles of war heroines from Germany, Poland, France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark, Great Britain, and the United States.

March is Music in our Schools Month. Music makers come from all cultures and backgrounds, and sometimes the music we enjoy the most comes from surprising sources. Check out some of the musicians and composers featured below. When possible, links to their music are also listed. 

A one-hundredth birthday tribute to the late jazz artist explores his observations about humanity's discriminatory and violent behaviors as well as his efforts to forge world peace through music with the Sun Ra Arkestra.

Listen: The Futuristic Sounds of Sun Ra

Describes how Juan García Esquivel, a Mexican composer popular in the 1950s and 1960s, developed his experimental style of music, based on mariachi and other Mexican music, jazz, the human voice, and the use of unusual instruments.

Listen: Nuevo (featuring Jean Garcia Esquivel)

This unique culinary history of America offers a fascinating look at our past and uses long-forgotten recipes to explain how eight flavors changed how we eat. The United States boasts a culturally and ethnically diverse population which makes for a continually changing culinary landscape. But a young historical gastronomist named Sarah Lohman discovered that American food is united by eight flavors: black pepper, vanilla, curry powder, chili powder, soy sauce, garlic, MSG, and Sriracha. In Eight Flavors , Lohman sets out to explore how these influential ingredients made their way to the American table. 

The things we keep by Sally Hepworth

Anna Forster, in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease at only thirty-eight years old, knows that her family is doing what they believe to be best when they take her to Rosalind House, an assisted living facility. She also knows there's just one another resident her age, Luke. What she does not expect is the love that blossoms between her and Luke even as she resists her new life at Rosalind House. As her disease steals more and more of her memory, Anna fights to hold on to what she knows, including her relationship with Luke. When Eve Bennett is suddenly thrust into the role of single mother she finds herself putting her culinary training to use at Rosalind house. When she meets Anna and Luke she is moved by the bond the pair has forged. But when a tragic incident leads Anna's and Luke's families to separate them, Eve finds herself questioning what she is willing to risk to help them.

this is an endlessly fascinating look at American regionalism and the eleven "nations" that continue to shape North America According to award-winning journalist and historian Colin Woodard, North America is made up of eleven distinct nations, each with its own unique historical roots. In American Nations he takes readers on a journey through the history of our fractured continent, offering a revolutionary and revelatory take on American identity, and how the conflicts between them have shaped our past and continue to mold our future. 

January 1961: President Eisenhower has three days to secure the nation's future before his young successor, John F. Kennedy, takes power -- a final mission by the legendary leader who planned D-Day and guided America through the darkening Cold War.  Bret Baier, the Chief Political Anchor for Fox News Channel and the Anchor and Executive Editor of Special Report with Bret Baier, illuminates the extraordinary yet underappreciated presidency of Dwight Eisenhower by taking readers into Ike's last days in power. Baier masterfully casts the period between Eisenhower's now-prophetic farewell address on the evening of January 17, 1961, and Kennedy's inauguration on the afternoon of January 20 as the closing act of one of modern America's greatest leaders — during which Eisenhower urgently sought to prepare both the country and the next president for the challenges ahead.

Based on a remarkable true story, an unforgettable Somali girl risks her life on the migrant journey to Europe to run in the Olympic Games. At eight years of age, Samia lives to run. She shares her dream with her best friend and neighbor, Ali, who appoints himself her "professional coach." Eight-year-old Ali trains her, times her, and pushes her to achieve her goals. For both children, Samia's running is the bright spot in their tumultuous life in Somalia. She is talented, brave, and determined to represent her country in the Olympic Games, just like her hero, the great Somali runner Mo Farah. For the next several years, Samia and Ali train at night in a deserted stadium as war rages and political tensions continue to escalate. Despite the lack of resources, despite the war, and despite all of the restrictions imposed on Somali women, Samia becomes a world-class runner. As a teenager, she is selected to represent her country at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. She finishes last in her heat at the Games, but the sight of the small, skinny woman in modest clothes running in the dust of athletes like Veronica Campbell-Brown brings the Olympic stadium to its feet. Samia sets her sights on the 2012 Games in London. Conditions in Somalia have worsened, and she must make the arduous migrant journey across Africa and the Mediterranean alone. Just like millions of refugees, Samia risks her life for the hope of a better future..

In the mid-eighteenth century as England and France stand on the brink of war, John Newton is a young sailor wandering aimlessly through life. His only duty is to report to his ship and avoid disgracing his father-- until the night he hears Polly Catlett's enchanting voice, caroling. An intense connection quickly forms between the two, but John's reckless spirit and disregard for the Christian life are concerns for the responsible, devout Polly. When an ill-fated stop at a tavern leaves John imprisoned and bound, Polly must choose to either stand by his side or walk out of his life forever..

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