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May We Suggest

May We Suggest?This blog provides customized book recommendations to our patrons. To get your own, just fill out the May We Suggest form and you can expect results within 10 days. You can also like May We Suggest on facebook.

Go West!

In 1890 the U.S. Census Bureau declared the American frontier to be "closed" - ending one hundred years of expansion. In July, 1893, Frederick Jackson Turner delivered his essay The Significance of the Frontier in American History at the World's Columbia Exposition in Chicago, explaining his views on how the idea of a frontier helped to shaped America's characteristics. Beginning with the mountain men and Lewis & Clark, and ending with the closing of the frontier, the Library has a great collection of resources available about our country's westward movement. Start with some of the titles below:

Across the Great Divide: Robert Stuart and the discovery of the Oregon Trail by Laton McCartney

After Lewis and Clark: mountain men and the paths to the Pacific by Robert M. Utley ; maps by Peter H. Dana

The American West by Dee Brown ; photos edited by Martin F.Schmitt

Cookbooks for Kids

Kids, earn your Chow Down badge this summer by checking out a cookbook from the children's nonfiction collection. Here are some fun titles to consider:

Sleuth It: Dead & Done VII

Historical mysteries let the reader be picked up and be transported to different times and places. A good story is a painless way to get into the period, and, if it features a unsolved crime or two, give a look at history’s darker underside.

Bellfield Hall by Anna Dean

Pride and prescience, or, A truth universally acknowledged by Carrie Bebris

Mute witness by Charles O'Brien

A beautiful blue death by Charles Finch

A conspiracy of paper by David Liss

Sleuth It! Mystery MeetUp

If you weren't able to attend Mystery MeetUp and earn your Sleuth It Badge as part of Connect Your Summer 2013, Canton Public Library's Summer Reading program for all ages, here is the list of books we talked about.

A cold day in paradise by Steve Hamilton

Iron Lake by William Kent Krueger



Blood alone by James R. Benn

As if by magic by Dolores Gordon-Smith

The hell screen by I.J. Parker

A duty to the dead by Charles Todd

Murder on Nob Hill by Shirley Tallman

Cool Cult Classics for Hot Summer Nights

Cult classics: the good, the so-bad-they're-good, and the ugly-but-still-pretty-good. They are the films that inspire a dedicated following, line-quoting, group viewings and many a Halloween costume. They may not have done that well at the box office, but they're survived the ages with their special cult status.

Have you seen these cult classics? If not, beat the heat with a viewing of some of these unconventionally cool movies.

The princess bride [videodisc] by [presented by] Act III Communications [Buttercup Films Ltd., The Princess Bride Ltd.]

Office space [videodisc] by Twentieth Century Fox presents a Mike Judge film

The Rocky Horror picture show [videodisc] by Twentieth Century Fox presents a Michael White-Lou Adler production

Labyrinth [videodisc] by the Jim Henson Company and Lucasfilm Ltd. presents a Jim Henson film

Raising Arizona [videodisc] by 20th Century Fox ; Circle Films presents a Ted and Jim Pedasa/Ben Barenholtz production

Detroit History

This Special Collection was created as Detroit prepared to celebrate its 300th birthday, a year-long event that was marked by a host of festivities and events. The history of the city is broad enough and rich enough, though, to warrant a continual presence and periodic updating as one of the library's special online resource collections. As we celebrate the city's 312th birthday, check the books, websites and other materials listed here to discover more about the Motor City and its colorful past.

History of Detroit

Celebrating 300 Years of Detroit Cooking, 1701 to 2001 edited by Marguerite J. Humes: A "historical cookbook" presenting information about Detroit's social setting and cooking history from 1701 to 2001. Includes original recipes handed down by Native Americans and immigrants alike, as well as some developed by native Detroiters.

Detroit, 1860-1899 by David Lee Poremba: Venture back in time to Detroit in the mid to late 19th century with this fascinating book.

Detroit: A Motor City History by David Lee Poremba: A concise and highly readable history by the acting manager of the Burton Historical Collection at the Detroit Public Library.

Detroit: Across Three Centuries by Richard Bak: Bak introduces readers to some of the epic names and events from the city's past.

Great Discoveries in Physics

It was 100 years ago this year, in 1913, that physicist Niels Bohr discovered the quantum atom (i.e the atomic nucleus in the center with the electrons in orbit around it). For this work he received the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1922. In honor of this goundbreaking event read about some of the other amazing discoveries by physicists throughout history:

American Prometheus: the triumph and tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer by Kai Bird and Martin J. Sherwin

The Curies: a biography of the most controversial family in science by Denis Brian

Degrees Kelvin: a tale of genius, invention, and tragedy by David Lindley

Edward Teller: the real Dr. Strangelove by Peter Goodchild