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May We Suggest

May We Suggest?This blog provides customized book recommendations to our patrons. To get your own, just fill out the May We Suggest form and you can expect results within 10 days. You can also like May We Suggest on facebook.

Celebrating Extraordinary Women Throughout History

Marie Curie. Eleanor Roosevelt. Susan B. Anthony. Elizabeth I of England. Florence Nightingale. These remarkable women are well known to most of us, but there are many others in history just as remarkable whose names may not be as recognizable. In honor of Women's History Month we should all make some time to learn about them by reading some of the many biographies to found in the library's collection:

Bella Abzug: how one tough broad from the Bronx fought Jim Crow and Joe McCarthy, pissed off Jimmy Carter, battled for the rights of women and workers, rallied against war and for the planet, and shook up politics along the way: an oral history by Suzanne Braun Levine and Mary Thom — Bella Abzug, American lawyer, congresswoman and social activist

Jane Addams and the dream of American democracy: a life by Jean Bethke Elshtain — Jane Addams, American social reformer, suffrage leader and the first woman to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize

Anna of all the Russias: the life of Anna Akhmatova by Elaine Feinstein — Anna Akhmatova, Influential Russian poet

African American Children's Biographies

February is National African American History Month, and we've put together a series of suggestions for children's reading materials. The library has an assortment of biographies featuring African Americans throughout history. Several of these titles have been recognized by the Coretta Scott King Book Awards, given annually to outstanding African American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate an appreciate of African American culture and universal human values.

NOTE: Children read at different levels at different times in their lives. It is up to the child and their parent to determine which of these suggestions are appropriate for them.
 

Brown girl dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson
Recognized with the National Book and Coretta Scott King Author Awards among other honors, this poetic autobiography of an award winning author takes us back in time to the 1960s and 1970s.

African American Children's Fiction

February is National African American History Month, and we've put together a series of suggestions for children's reading materials. These are chapter books featuring African American characters. Several titles are distinguished by being honored with or winning the Coretta Scott King Award, which is given annually to African American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate an appreciation of African American culture and universal human values. Also on this list are several authors that have been honored or won the Newbery Award, awarded to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children in the previous year.

NOTE: Children read at different levels at different times in their lives. It is up to the child and their parent to determine which of these suggestions are appropriate for them.

 

The Crossover by Kwame Alexander
Winner of the 2015 Newbery Award and recognized as a 2015 Coretta Scott King Author Honor, this novel in verse follows twin basketball stars Josh and Jordan wrestle with highs and lows on and off the court as their father ignores his declining health.

African American Month Picture Books

February is National African American History Month, and this is the first in a series of suggestions for children's reading materials. First up are picture books featuring African American characters. Several titles are distinguished by being honored with or winning the Coretta Scott King Award, which is given annually to African American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate an appreciation of African American culture and universal human values. 

Knock knock: my dad's dream for me by Daniel Beaty ; illustrated by Bryan Collier
Winner of the 2014 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award, this picture book details how a boy deals with his father's absence.

I'm not moving by written by Wiley Blevins ; illustrated by Mattia Cerato
Keesha's family is moving from the suburbs to the city, and she is worried and not happy about this turn of events.

Documentaries for Black History Month

American Experience: The Abolitionists by Artist Not Provided — Men and women, black and white, Northerners and Southerners, poor and wealthy, these passionate anti-slavery activists fought  in the most important civil rights crusade in American history. Part of the PBS series American Experience.


Africans in America [videodisc]: America's journey through slavery by produced for PBS by WGBH Boston — The story of slavery's birth in the early 1660s through the onset of thr Civil War. Narrated by Academy Award nominee Angela Bassett.


4 little girls [videodisc] by an HBO documentary film in association with 40 Acres and a Mule Filmworks production ; a Spike Lee Joint — When a bomb tore through the basement of a black Baptist church in Birmingham, Alabama on September 15, 1963, it took the lives of four young girls. This powerful documentary captures a time, a place, and a way of life that would be forever altered by their deaths. Directed by Spike Lee.

Murder Will Out: February 2015

Lorne "Gump" Worsley, Hockey Hall of Fame goaltender, had a "seven-point recipe for goalie survival" Rule # 7: "read mystery stories."  Sounds like a good idea to me.  We have several debut authors this month to try.


Dry bones in the valley: a novel by Tom Bouman

City of devils by Diana Bretherick

Geared for the grave by Duffy Brown

Wink of an eye by Lynn Chandler Willis

Snow White red-handed by Maia Chance

Sequels and Prequels to Classics for Adults

It was just announced yesterday that Harper Lee will be releasing a sequel this summer to her Pulitzer Prize winning novel To Kill a Mockingbirdpublished over 50 years ago. We've already received requests for the book, titled  Go Set a Watchmanso hop on the hold list now before you forget. In the meantime, To Kill a Mockingbird isn't the only book the received a sequel or a prequel years after the first book was published. Check out some of these delayed delights while you’re waiting.

Murder Will Out: Harry Bosch Returns

Look for the return of Bosch to amazon.com's streaming series on February 13.  Featuring the character from Michael Connelly’s best-selling Harry Bosch series, amazon.com Prime tested the waters last Fall with a one hour Bosch videocast.  If you haven't read this award-winning series try it now.

The black echo by Michael Connelly

To Kill a Mockingbird Alternatives for Teens

It was just announced yesterday that Harper Lee will be releasing a sequel this summer to her Pulitzer Prize winning novel To Kill a Mockingbirdpublished over 50 years ago. We've already received requests for the book, titled Go Set a Watchman, so hop on the hold list now before you forget. In the meantime, we've compiled a list of books that reference and draw inspiration from the classic.

Mockingbird: (mok'ing-bûrd) by Kathryn Erskine
In this National Book Award winning title, ten-year-old Caitlin, who suffers from Asperger’s syndrome, references
To Kill a Mockingbird as she struggles to come to grips with her grief after her brother is killed in a school shooting.