Lunch & a Book

The library's lunchtime book discussion group started in September 1998. Books include works of fiction and nonfiction, classics and contemporary novels. We meet on the second Thursday of the month from Noon to 1:00 PM. The December meeting is used to share favorite titles and make suggestions for the coming year.

Lunch and a Book 2016 Reading List

Lunch and a Book meets the second Thursday of the month from 12:00-1:00PM.  No registration required, participation encouraged.

All the light we cannot see: a novel by Anthony Doerr — January 14

 

The girl on the train by Paula Hawkins — February 11

 

 

The invention of wings: a novel by Sue Monk Kidd — March 10

 

 

Shanghai girls: a novel by Lisa See — April 14

 

 

Sidney Chambers and the shadow of death by James Runcie — May 12

 

Lunch and a Book October 2016

Please join Lunch and a Book to discuss:

The nightingale by Kristin Hannah
Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook | large print

Viann and Isabelle have always been close despite their differences. Younger, bolder sister Isabelle lives in Paris while Viann lives a quiet and content life in the French countryside with her husband Antoine and their daughter. When World War II strikes and Antoine is sent off to fight, Viann and Isabelle's father sends Isabelle to help her older sister cope. As the war progresses, it's not only the sisters' relationship that is tested, but also their strength and their individual senses of right and wrong. With life as they know it changing in unbelievably horrific ways, Viann and Isabelle will find themselves facing frightening situations and responding in ways they never thought possible as bravery and resistance take different forms in each of their actions. Vivid and exquiste in its illumination of a time and place that was filled with great monstrosities, but also great humanity and strength.

Upcoming sessions

Thursday, October 13 -
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
Community Room

Lunch and a Book September 2016

Please join Lunch & a Book to discuss:

The Turner house by Angela Flournoy
Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook | large print

The Turners have lived on Yarrow Street for over fifty years. Their house has seen thirteen children grown and gone--and some returned; it has seen the arrival of grandchildren, the fall of Detroit's East Side, and the loss of a father. The house still stands despite abandoned lots, an embattled city, and the inevitable shift outward to the suburbs. But now, as ailing matriarch Viola finds herself forced to leave her home and move in with her eldest son, the family discovers that the house is worth just a tenth of its mortgage. The Turner children are called home to decide its fate and to reckon with how each of their pasts haunts--and shapes--their family's future. The Turner House brings us a colorful, complicated brood full of love and pride, sacrifice and unlikely inheritances. 

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Lunch and a Book August 2016

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Also available in: audiobook

Using her own experiences as a starting point, journalist and cultural critic Kate Bolick invites us into her carefully considered, passionately lived life, weaving together the past and present to examine why­ she--along with over 100 million American women, whose ranks keep growing--remains unmarried. This unprecedented demographic shift, Bolick explains, is the logical outcome of hundreds of years of change that has neither been fully understood, nor appreciated. Spinster introduces a cast of pioneering women from the last century whose genius, tenacity, and flair for drama have emboldened Bolick to fashion her life on her own terms: columnist Neith Boyce, essayist Maeve Brennan, social visionary Charlotte Perkins Gilman, poet Edna St. Vincent Millay, and novelist Edith Wharton.

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Lunch and a Book July 2016

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Learn more and earn badges on the Connect Your Summer page.
Go set a watchman by Harper Lee
Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook | large print

Twenty-six-year-old Jean Louise Finch-"Scout"-returns home from New York City to visit her aging father, Atticus. Set against the backdrop of the civil rights tensions and political turmoil that were transforming the South, Jean Louise's homecoming turns bittersweet when she learns disturbing truths about her close-knit family, the town, and the people dearest to her. Memories from her childhood flood back, and her values and assumptions are thrown into doubt. Featuring many of the iconic characters from To Kill a Mockingbird, Go Set a Watchman perfectly captures a young woman, and a world, in painful yet necessary transition out of the illusions of the past - a journey that can only be guided by one's own conscience. Written in the mid-1950s, Go Set a Watchman imparts a fuller, richer understanding and appreciation of Harper Lee. 

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Lunch and a Book June 2016

This post contains suggestions for how to earn your Explore History: On the Scene badge.
Learn more and earn badges on the Connect Your Summer page.
Also available in: audiobook | e-audiobook

With the novelistic flair and knack for historical detail Catherine Bailey displayed in her New York Times bestseller The Secret Rooms, Black Diamonds provides a page-turning chronicle of the Fitzwilliam coal-mining dynasty and their breathtaking Wentworth estate, the largest private home in England. When the sixth Earl Fitzwilliam died in 1902, he left behind the second largest estate in twentieth-century England--a lifeline to the tens of thousands of people who worked either in the family's coal mines or on their expansive estate. The earl also left behind four sons, and the family line seemed assured. But was it? 

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Also available in: audiobook

It is 1953, the coronation year of Elizabeth II. Sidney Chambers, vicar of Grantchester, is a thirty-two-year-old bachelor and an unconventional clerical detective who can go where the police cannot. Together with his friend, inspector Geordie Keating, Sidney inquires into the suspect suicide of a Cambridge solicitor, a jewelry theft at a New Year's Eve dinner party, the death of a jazz promoter's daughter, and an art forgery that puts a close friend in danger. Sidney discovers that being a detective, like being a clergyman, means that you are never off duty, but he nonetheless manages to find time for a keen interest in cricket, warm beer, and hot jazz. Join us Thursday, May 12 at noon.

Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook

In 1937, Shanghai is a city of great wealth and glamour. Thanks to the financial security provided by their father's prosperous rickshaw business, twenty-one-year-old Pearl Chin and her younger sister, May, are having the time of their lives. Both are beautiful, modern, and carefree . . . until the day their father tells them that he has gambled away their wealth. In order to repay his debts he sells the girls as wives to suitors who have traveled from California to find Chinese brides. As Japanese bombs fall on their beloved city, Pearl and May set out on the journey of a lifetime, one that will take them through the Chinese countryside, in and out of the clutch of brutal soldiers, and across the Pacific to the shores of America. Join us as we discuss the 2016 Everyone's Reading title on Thursday, April 14 at noon.

Also available in: e-book | audiobook | large print

The story follows Hetty "Handful" Grimke, a Charleston slave, and Sarah, the daughter of the wealthy Grimke family. The novel begins on Sarah's eleventh birthday, when she is given ownership over Handful, who is to be her handmaid. "The Invention of Wings" follows the next thirty-five years of their lives. Inspired in part by the historical figure of Sarah Grimke (a feminist, suffragist and, importantly, an abolitionist), Kidd allows herself to go beyond the record to flesh out the inner lives of all the characters, both real and imagined". Join us on Thursday, March 10 at noon.

The girl on the train by Paula Hawkins
Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook | large print

Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day it flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She's even started to feel like she knows them. Their life seems perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost. And then she sees something shocking. It's only a minute until the train moves on, but now everything's changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined. Please join us at noon on February 11.

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