Connect Your Summer

Not sure which superhero is the most awesome? Check out these great reads and have fun finding out!

At the airport, Eugene bumps into Fun E. Racer, disguised as a flight attendant, who intends to stop him from going on vacation.

When George and Harold hypnotize their principal into thinking that he is the superhero Captain Underpants, he leads them to the lair of the nefarious Dr. Diaper, where they must defeat his evil robot henchmen.

Who Can Participate?

Anyone! People of all ages who want to have a great summer.

How Do I Register?

Completing an entire puzzle can be quite a feat, but together we can connect the pieces in no time! Stop in to the Library to work on one of the featured puzzles at our Puzzle Station. 

Add a few pieces as you pass by, or pull up a chair and relax for a bit. Work alone or with a friend. We'll have different puzzles throughout the summer, so be sure to check back for new challenges.

Speaking of challenges, this and other activities are a great way to complete your Connect Your Summer challenges and help us work toward our community goal! Are you ready to have your Best Summer Ever?

Also available in: video

On a day when everything goes wrong for him, Alexander is consoled by the thought that other people have bad days too.

The ant bully by John Nickle
Also available in: video

Lucas learns a lesson about bullying when he is pulled into the ant hole he has been tormenting.

Five electrical appliances find that their young owner has disappeared. The toaster takes charge, rounding up the vacuum cleaner, the electric blanket, bedside lamp and radio. Together they take off for the big city in search of their master. Based on the book by Thom Demijohn.

Thorndyke the Bear in a READ shirt

Reluctant readers come in all ages, stages, and sizes. This summer, overcome a lack of enthusiasm with these tips, which can be applied to reading ruts of all kinds. Examples link to children's materials, but these suggestions can work for grown-ups, too.

  • Forget reading level for just a minute, and start with interests or hobbies. Search for fiction and nonfiction that focus on that topic. Maybe you like soccer: use our subject headings to find relevant biographiesfiction, and nonfiction.
  • Explore picture books. There are many beautiful titles that are worth reading, and as a bonus are short and satisfying.
  • Use writing as a springboard and create a summer journal. Then see why journal-format fiction is so popular.
  • Explore the graphic novel shelf. Dense illustrations make a reader slow down to really enjoy the story.
  • Come to a book discussion program, or start your own. Read the book together. Reading can be more fun when it's shared, and even if you hated the book, you can talk about how much you disliked it.
  • Grab some poetry. Sometimes it's serious, but a lot of times it's silly and entertaining.
  • Listen to an audiobook. All of the story and vocabulary words without the visuals. Even better if you're listening with the whole family on a road trip and can discuss the story as you go.
  • Pick something you want to DO - maybe you want to travel to Ireland, become a scientist, or learn to keep bees. Use books to gather useful information for your quest.
  • Look for a book that has a movie version. Even picture books have been made into full-length movies. Read, and then watch. Which did you like better?
  • Start with music, and listen to a favorite album or song artist. Then learn more about that person, maybe even in their own words.

No matter what, keep trying. Try new formats, try new recommendations, try non-print stories. It's never too late to find something good.

To begin Connect Your Summer this year, you will receive a StoryBox. After that, it's up to you. Below are a few books to help you think about what exactly you might do with that box.

When a girl receives a beautiful porcelain box from her grandmother, she immediately wants something special to put inside it. What does she love best? She loves jumping in puddles on rainy days, blowing bubbles in the park, and watching her little sister's first steps. Life's most precious treasures cannot be contained in a box! Features a sparkly die-cut star on the cover, and flaps throughout reveal hidden surprises.

What to do with a box by Jane Yolen

Jane Yolen poetically reminds young readers that a simple box can be a child's most imaginative plaything as artist Chris Sheban illustrates its myriad and magical uses.

May 29 marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of John F. Kennedy. Learn more about our 35th president by checking out some of the Library's many resources.

Is there a song that changed your life? A song that made you feel happy or understood or saved? Check out a title that explores the effect of music in the lives of young people. 

Naked '76 by Kevin Brooks

In the summer of 1976, when punk rock is taking over England, Lili finds herself playing bass for a wild new band called Naked, and struggling to sort out complicated relationships with self-destructive band mates.

Is there a song that changed your life? A song that made you feel happy or understood or saved? Check out a title that explores the effect of music in the lives of young people. 

The bad decisions playlist by Michael Rubens

"Sixteen-year-old Austin, a self-described screw-up, finds out that his allegedly dead father happens to be the very-much-alive rock star Shane Tyler. Austin--a talented musician himself--is sucked into his newfound father's alluring music-biz orbit, pulling his true love, Josephine, along with him"--.

Exile by Kevin Emerson

As band manager for the up-and-coming DangerHeart, seventeen-year-old Summer Carlson navigates a relationship with the lead singer and decides whether to act on information that could rocket the band to stardom.

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