Nonfiction

In this definitive biography, veteran sportswriter Tom Callahan shines a spotlight on one of the greatest golfers ever to play the game.

Nevertheless : a memoir by Alec Baldwin

The Lowells of Massachusetts were a remarkable family. They were settlers in the New World in the 1600s, revolutionaries creating a new nation in the 1700s, merchants and manufacturers building prosperity in the 1800s, and scientists and artists flourishing in the 1900s. For the first time, Nina Sankovitch tells the story of this fascinating and powerful dynasty

April 6, 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of America's entry into World War I on the side of the Allies. More than 2 million American soldiers served before the war's end on November 11, 1918.

Boston's massacre by Eric Hinderaker

On the night of March 5, 1770, British soldiers fired into a crowd gathered in front of Boston's Custom House, killing five people. Denounced as an act of unprovoked violence and villainy, the event that came to be known as the Boston Massacre is one of the most familiar incidents in American history, yet one of the least understood. Eric Hinderaker revisits this dramatic episode, examining in forensic detail the facts of that fateful night, the competing narratives that molded public perceptions at the time, and the long campaign afterward to transform the tragedy into a touchstone of American identity.

A riveting history of the month that transformed the world's greatest nations as Russia faced revolution and America entered World War I.

The Spur Awards are annual literary prizes awarded by the Western Writers of America (WWA). The Spur Awards honor writers for distinguished writing about the American West. The Spur awards began in 1953, the same year the WWA was founded.

Historical Fiction Winner

April 2, 1513.  Spanish explorer Ponce De Leon sighted Florida and claimed it for Spain. His landing site is now present day St. Augustine -  the oldest city in the continental United States.

April 2, 1792.  Congress established the first U.S. Mint in the city of Philadelphia.

April 3, 1860.  The Pony Express service began as the first rider departed St. Joseph, Missouri. Letters were delivered 2,000 miles to California within ten days, with each rider traveling 75 to 100 miles before handing off  to the next. After less than two years the service became obsolete with the completion of the overland telegraph.

Nonfiction Book Group May 2017

Please join the Nonfiction Book Group to discuss:

Also available in: e-book | audiobook | large print

Oxford English Dictionary began in 1857, took seventy years to complete, drew from tens of thousands of brilliant minds, and organized the sprawling language into 414,825 precise definitions. Hidden within the rituals of its creation is the story of two remarkable men.

Professor James Murray was the distinguished editor of the OED project. Dr. William Chester Minor was one of thousands of contributors. Minor was remarkably prolific, sending thousands of neat, handwritten quotations from his home in the small village of Crowthorne, fifty miles from Oxford. On numerous occasions, Murray invited Minor to visit Oxford, but Murray's offer was regularly--and mysteriously--refused.

Finally, in 1896, after Minor had sent nearly ten thousand definitions to the dictionary, a puzzled Murray set out to visit him. It was then that Murray finally learned that Minor was a murderer locked up in Broadmoor, England's harshest asylum for criminal lunatics.

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Nonfiction