Nonfiction

Cemeteries are crucial for any genealogist's search, and this book will show you how to search for and analyze your ancestors' graves. Discover tools for locating tombstones, tips for traipsing through cemeteries, an at-a-glance guide to frequently used gravestone icons, and practical strategies for on-the-ground research. 

Relying on the latest scholarship, Gates leads us on a romp through African American history and gossip in question and answer format: Who was the first African American? What was the second Middle Passage? Did black people own slaves? Why was cotton king? Who was the first black president in North America? How much African ancestry does the average African American have? Who really invented "the talented tenth"? What were the biggest acts of betrayal within the enslaved community? Who was the first black American woman to be a self-made millionaire? 

This book is the first to explore photographic representations of Detroit during the hours from dusk until dawn, featuring work by artists including Robert Frank, Leni Sinclair, Steve Shaw, Russ Marshall, and Dave Jordano, among others. The city's streets, architecture, vast industrial complexes, night clubs, and unique subcultures are captured here in otherworldly visions of the nighttime urban landscape from the 1950s to the present day. These images offer a unique interpretation of Detroit, its industry, culture, and turbulent history through the second half of the 20th century and into the 21st.

In The History of the Future, McPherson reexamines American places and the space between history, experience, and myth. Private streets, racism, and the St. Louis World's Fair; fracking for oil and digging for dinosaurs in North Dakota boomtowns-Americana slides into apocalypse in these essays, revealing us to ourselves.

Leonardo da Vinci by Walter Isaacson

Based on thousands of pages from Leonardo's astonishing notebooks and new discoveries about his life and work, Walter Isaacson weaves a narrative that connects his art to his science. -.

November 8, 1923.  Hitler's "Beer Hall Putsch" took place in Munich took place, wherein Hitler, Goering and armed Nazis attempted, but ultimately failed, to forcibly seize power and overthrow democracy in Germany.

November 9 -10, 1938.  Kristallnacht ("the night of broken glass") took place in Germany as Nazi mobs burned synagogues and vandalized Jewish shops and homes.

November 9, 1989.  The Berlin Wall was opened after standing for 28 years during which it completely cut off West Berlin from Eastern Germany. The almost 28 mile long wall had been built  in 1961.

In 1990, President George H.W. Bush declared the month of November as "National American Indian Heritage Month", which has come to be commonly referred to as Native American Heritage Month. By either name it is a time of "recognition for the significant contributions the first Americans made to the establishment and growth of the U.S." The Library's collection is a great place to look for materials about Native Americans and their place in our country's history.

Investigator Theresa Argie and journalist Eric Olsen team up to take you on a first-person tour of some of America's most active paranormal hotspots. Experience the crawl through the death tunnel where visitors have reported sightings of an inhuman creature that creeps along the walls and ceilings. Walk the decks of the Queen Mary with the dozens of souls that met their ends in watery graves. And get to know the spirits that wait in prisons, mansions, lunatic asylums, and even a stately old hotel.

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