Also available in: e-book | e-audiobook | large print

"This is what we long for: the profound pleasure of being swept into vivid new worlds, worlds peopled by characters so intriguing and real that we can't shake them, even long after the reading's done. In his earlier, award-winning novels, Dominic Smith demonstrated a gift for coaxing the past to life. Now, in The Last Painting of Sara de Vos, he deftly bridges the historical and the contemporary, tracking a collision course between a rare landscape by a female Dutch painter of the golden age, an inheritor of the work in 1950s Manhattan, and a celebrated art historian who painted a forgery of it in her youth. In 1631, Sara de Vos is admitted as a master painter to the Guild of St. Luke's in Holland, the first woman to be so recognized. Three hundred years later, only one work attributed to de Vos is known to remain--a haunting winter scene, At the Edge of a Wood, which hangs over the bed of a wealthy descendant of the original owner. An Australian grad student, Ellie Shipley, struggling to stay afloat in New York, agrees to paint a forgery of the landscape, a decision that will haunt her. Because now, half a century later, she's curating an exhibit of female Dutch painters, and both versions threaten to arrive. As the three threads intersect, The Last Painting of Sara de Vos mesmerizes while it grapples with the demands of the artistic life, showing how the deceits of the past can forge the present"--.

Also available in: e-book

Advances in technology are creating the next economy and enabling us to make things/do things/connect with others in smarter, cheaper, faster, more effective ways. But the price of this progress has been a decoupling of the engine of prosperity from jobs that have been the means by which people have ascended to (and stayed in) the middle class. Andy Stern, the former president of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) spent four years traveling the country and asking economists, futurists, labor leaders, CEOs, investment bankers, entrepreneurs, and political leaders to help picture the U.S. economy 25 to 30 years from now. He vividly reports on people who are analyzing and creating this new economy--such as investment banker Steve Berkenfeld; David Cote, the CEO of Honeywell International; Andy Grove of Intel; Carl Camden, the CEO of Kelly Services; and Geoffrey Canada of the Harlem Children's Zone. Through these stories, we come to a stark and deeper understanding of the toll technological progress will continue to take on jobs and income and its inevitable effect on tens of millions of people. But there is hope for our economy and future. The foundation of economic prosperity for all Americans, Stern believes, is a universal basic income. The idea of a universal basic income for all Americans is controversial but American attitudes are shifting. Stern has been a game changer throughout his career, and his next goal is to create a movement that will force the political establishment to take action against something that many on both the right and the left believe is inevitable. Stern's plan is bold, idealistic, and challenging--and its time has come.

Lunch and a Book October 2016

Please join Lunch and a Book to discuss:

The nightingale by Kristin Hannah
Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook | large print

Viann and Isabelle have always been close despite their differences. Younger, bolder sister Isabelle lives in Paris while Viann lives a quiet and content life in the French countryside with her husband Antoine and their daughter. When World War II strikes and Antoine is sent off to fight, Viann and Isabelle's father sends Isabelle to help her older sister cope. As the war progresses, it's not only the sisters' relationship that is tested, but also their strength and their individual senses of right and wrong. With life as they know it changing in unbelievably horrific ways, Viann and Isabelle will find themselves facing frightening situations and responding in ways they never thought possible as bravery and resistance take different forms in each of their actions. Vivid and exquiste in its illumination of a time and place that was filled with great monstrosities, but also great humanity and strength.

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Lots of fun reads, but if you have time for only one read make it Nicholas Carr's The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains, a balanced report on our growing reliance on the internet with a brief history of reading, books, and libraries.

Murder on the bucket list by Elizabeth Perona

Nonfiction Book Group September 2016

Please join the Nonfiction Book Group to discuss:

Also available in: e-book | audiobook | large print

A loving and hilarious--if occasionally spiky--valentine to Bill Bryson's adopted country, Great Britain. Twenty years ago, Bill Bryson went on a trip around Britain to discover that green and pleasant land. The result was Notes from a Small Island, a true classic and one of the bestselling travel books ever written. Now he has traveled about Britain again, by bus and train and rental car and on foot, to see what has changed--and what hasn't. Following (but not too closely) a route he dubs the Bryson Line, from Bognor Regis in the south to Cape Wrath in the north Bryson rediscovers the wondrously beautiful, magnificently eccentric, endearingly singular country.

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Lunch and a Book September 2016

Please join Lunch & a Book to discuss:

The Turner house by Angela Flournoy
Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook | large print

The Turners have lived on Yarrow Street for over fifty years. Their house has seen thirteen children grown and gone--and some returned; it has seen the arrival of grandchildren, the fall of Detroit's East Side, and the loss of a father. The house still stands despite abandoned lots, an embattled city, and the inevitable shift outward to the suburbs. But now, as ailing matriarch Viola finds herself forced to leave her home and move in with her eldest son, the family discovers that the house is worth just a tenth of its mortgage. The Turner children are called home to decide its fate and to reckon with how each of their pasts haunts--and shapes--their family's future. The Turner House brings us a colorful, complicated brood full of love and pride, sacrifice and unlikely inheritances. 

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

The Canton Seniors Book Group meets on the fourth Thursday of the every month (except December) from 2:00-3:00 PM in Group Study Room A.  Librarians Elaine Skrzynski and Joyce Simowski alternately lead the discussion. No registration required.

The girl on the train by Paula Hawkins
Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook | large print

The Big Library Read is a “global eBook club,” connecting readers around the world who read the same eBook at the same time. The 2016 summer selection is: A Murder in Time by Julie McElwain.  The program runs from June 23 through July 7, and during this time OverDrive offers unlimited checkouts on the title. With no waiting list, you can  check the book out today!

The Winners Are...

The winners of the 2016 Agatha and Edgar awards have been announced.  The awards are to materials published during the calendar year 2015 (January 1 - December 31).  A complete list of the winners and nominees are available on Malice Domestic's (Agatha Christie Award) and the Mystery Writers of America's (Edgar Allan Poe Award) websites.  

Agatha Awards

Canton Public Library's CONNECT YOUR SUMMER reading program kicks of this month. Any of these selections could earn the YOU CHOOSE badge.

"Both dispatch and dissertation, NPR contributor Diane Roberts, an English professor at Florida State University, gives a insider's account of a big time college football program in the midst of controversy, while examining the impact and legacy of the sport's popularity in America today"--.

"This intimate portrait by his former personal assistant and confidante reveals the man behind the legendary filmmaker--for the first time. Stanley Kubrick, the director of a string of timeless movies from Lolita and Dr. Strangelove to A Clockwork Orange, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Full Metal Jacket, and others, has always been depicted by the media as the Howard Hughes of filmmakers, a weird artist obsessed with his work and privacy to the point of madness. But who was he really? Emilio D'Alessandro lets us see. A former Formula Ford driver who was a minicab chauffeur in London during the Swinging Sixties, he took a job driving a giant phallus through the city that became his introduction to the director. Honest, reliable, and ready to take on any task, Emilio found his way into Kubrick's neurotic, obsessive heart. He became his personal assistant, his right-hand man and confidant, working for him from A Clockwork Orange until Kubrick's death in 1999. Emilio was the silent guy in the room when the script for The Shining was discussed. He still has the coat Jack Nicholson used in the movie. He was an extra on the set of Eyes Wide Shut, Kubrick's last movie. He knew all the actors and producers Kubrick worked with; he observed firsthand Kubrick's working methods down to the smallest detail. Making no claim of expertise in cinematography but with plenty of anecdotes, he offers a completely fresh perspective on the artist and a warm, affecting portrait of a generous, kind, caring man who was a perfectionist in work and life. "--.


Use your Canton Library Card to access digital books and media using Hoopla.

How does Raccoon love pizza? Oh, let him count the ways. He loves the gooey cheesy-ness, salty pepperoni-ness, sweet sweet tomato-ness, and of course the crispity crunchity crust. But someone is always chasing poor Raccoon away from his favorite food with a broom! What's a hungry raccoon to do? Plan an elaborate secret pizza party, of course! But shhh! It's a secret! In fact, you should probably just forget I told you. Nope, no secret pizza party happening here. You didn't already tell all your friends, did you? Uh oh...

Ever wonder how to handle a Hot Potato? or make a Fruit Salad?? Murray, Jeff, Anthony and Greg will have your child singing, laughing and grooving. Sing along to funny tunes about numbers, food and favorite animal friends. Also along for the yummy fun is Dorothy, Wags, Henry and Captain Feathersword. Get ready to Wiggle!.


Subscribe to RSS - E-books