Books

 

Today the American Library Association just announced the top youth books and media of 2018, including the John Newbery Award. The Association for Library Service to Children has awarded the Newbery for over 90 years for the most outstanding contribution to children's literature. 

To find past award winners in our catalog to check availability, do a title search for Newbery Medal Winner. For more information about this award and its recipients, check the ALA website.

Help us recognize these honorees and winners by checking one out today.

2018 Newbery Award Winner

Hello, universe by Erin Entrada Kelly

Lives of four misfits are intertwined when a bully's prank lands shy Virgil at the bottom of a well and Valencia, Kaori, and Gen band together in an epic quest to find and rescue him.

 

The American Library Association just announced the top youth books and media of 2018, including the Randolph Caldecott Award. This award goes to the illustrator of the most distinguished American picture book for children.

To find past award winners in our catalog or to check availability, do a title search for Caldecott Medal Winner. For more information about this award and its recipients, check the ALA website.

Help us recognize these honorees and winners by checking one out today.

2018 Caldecott Winner

Wolf in the snow by Matthew Cordell

When a wolf cub and little girl are lost in a snowstorm they must find their way home in this almost wordless celebration of empathy and compassion.

This week we had a tasty Dessert Storytime! Since we did this theme twice, there are twice as many books to enjoy. Be sure to grab a snack before reading. 

Books Read in Storytime

In 2017 the Canton Public Library Book Purchase Enrichment Fund was created through a generous anonymous donation from appreciative readers. This donation enhances our print collection through the purchase of literary fiction and literary genre fiction; or quality narrative nonfiction primarily in the areas of science, social science, the humanities, literary biographies, and history. If you're interested in contributing to the Canton Public Library Book Purchase Enrichment Fund, contact the fund's administrator, the Canton Community Foundation. Following are just a few of the books this thoughtful donation has allowed us to purchase in 2017. To find a complete list of books librarians have purchased with this money, keyword search the terms Book Purchase Enrichment Fund in our catalog.

A compelling account of the widening geopolitical cracks in a region that has flourished under an American security umbrella for more than half a century. The rivalry between China and Japan is threatening to upend the peace underwritten by Pax Americana since World War II. Combined with Donald Trump's disdain for America's old alliances and China's own regional ambitions, east Asia is entering a new era of instability and conflict. If the United States laid the postwar foundations for modern Asia, now the anchor of the global economy, Asia's Reckoning reveals how that structure is falling apart.

Stay with me by Ayobami Adebayo

Yejide and Akin have been married since they met and fell in love at university. Though many expected Akin to take several wives, he and Yejide have always agreed: polygamy is not for them. But four years into their marriage--after consulting fertility doctors and healers, trying strange teas and unlikely cures--Yejide is still not pregnant. She assumes she still has time--until her family arrives on her doorstep with a young woman they introduce as Akin's second wife. Furious, shocked, and livid with jealousy, Yejide knows the only way to save her marriage is to get pregnant. Which, finally, she does--but at a cost far greater than she could have dared to imagine.

Heart disease is a leading cause of death in the U.S for both men and women. Fortunately, it is preventable and there are many ways you can reduce your risks. Just by making small changes in diet and activity can have big impact on your heart health. Check these books out to get starting on a heart healthy month!

"Soon after she recovered from a major heart attack, public relations specialist Carolyn Thomas turned her talents to learning and blogging about heart disease in women--and, now, to writing a book based on her extensive knowledge of heart disease in women and her own experience and the experiences of other women with the disease. Her more than 600 Heart Sisters blog posts have attracted 5 million+ views from readers in 190 countries. Several of the posts have been re-published internationally, includingin the British Medical Journal. She has been an invited participant at Mayo Clinic's medical conference on women's heart disease, and her story has been picked up by WSJ, NPR, CBS TV and radio, among other places. This evidence-based book combines the personal, emotional, and medical to create an engaging and timely view of women's heart health and disease"--.

Evangelical and passionate, Mackey, cofounder of Whole Foods Market, along with Pulde and Lederman (co-authors of The Fork Over Knives Diet), reaches beyond the typical diet plan tenets of eating right to feel better and lose weight; this plan is expressly intended to help save and extend lives. The impetus for writing the book, the authors state, comes from the nation's high chronic illness rates, particularly in obesity, heart disease, and diabetes. They introduce the work and ideas of numerous like-minded health experts, highlight the world's healthiest societies, and include stories of Whole Foods employees successfully using the plan. The Whole Foods Diet, a play on the maternal admonishment to "eat your fruits and vegetables," is deceptively simple: consume a diet that's at least 90% plant-based, eat whole foods, and avoid highly processed foods. In reading further, readers may feel daunted: don't just limit dairy and meats to less than 10% of your diet, but also avoid oils (including olive oil!) and refined flour and sugar. And perhaps you'd like to make your own nut milk? Even if this health treatise's recommendations are unlikely to become universal, its tone is inspiring.

There is always something in life to be thankful for. Today's storytime focused on the idea of Gratitude and Being Thankful. Be sure to say "Thank You!" to someone special today and also enjoy these lovely books from today's storytime.

Books Read in Storytime

Did you miss our Penguin Storytime this week? Don't worry! Here are stories and songs so you can have your own storytime at home!

From Storytime

Up & down by Britta Teckentrup

Deciding to visit a friend he has been missing, Little Penguin leaps off his iceberg and embarks on a journey filled with ups and downs and ins and outs before the two are reunited, in a concept story that introduces opposites.

This year marks the 100th anniversary of one of the most devastating global disasters in world history, the Flu Pandemic of 1918. During the fall of the Great War in 1918, an extremely virulent strain of influenza began to spread worldwide. The H1N1 influenza virus also known as the Spanish Flu caused such widespread outbreaks that it killed one fifth of the world's population. This year's influenza strain, the H3N2, is not a new strain, but it's one of the most lethal. Already it has affected every state in the U.S. and is on track for surpassing previous flu seasonal records. What to learn more about viruses? Check out this list!

Also available in: e-audiobook

The history of "the greatest massacre of the twentieth century," an illness that infected more than 500 million people.Between 1918 and 1920, the "Spanish flu" killed more than 50 million people, far more than in the world war then raging. Unlike the familiar flu, which targets infants and the elderly, it killed healthy adults. It was mankind's worst epidemic, writes Paris-based science journalist and novelist Spinney (The Quick, 2007, etc.) in this fine account of influenza's history, its worst attack (so far), and its ominous future. Despite the name, Americans were probably the first to experience the fever, cough, headache, and general miseries of the infection. During spring and summer, it behaved like the usual flu, but in fall 1918, it turned deadly and spread across the world, killing 2.5 to 10 percent of victims, a fatality rate 20 times higher than normal. Scientists have offered countless theories about the illness, but Spinney looks favorably at a recent theory that the 1918 virus provoked a "cytokine storm," a deadly overreaction of the immune system. This may explain why infants and the elderly, with their weaker immune systems, had an easier time. In the middle sections of the book, the author describes how a dozen nations dealt with the epidemic. Heroism was not in short supply, but superstition, racism, ignorance (including among doctors), and politics usually prevailed. In the concluding section, Spinney recounts impressive scientific progress over the past century but no breakthroughs. Revealing the entire viral genome opens many possibilities, but so far none have emerged. Researchers are working to improve today's only modestly protective vaccine; Spinney expresses hope. Readers who worry about Ebola, Zika, or SARS should understand that epidemiologists agree that a recurrence of the 1918 virus would be worse. Short on optimism but a compelling, expert account of a half-forgotten historical catastrophe.

The author unpacks the complex cultural, social and scientific effects of the 1918 influenza epidemic and reveals the American voices that fill the gap of a suppressed national memory. In less than two years, influenza killed more than 50 million people worldwide, shocking existing medical infrastructures and destabilizing the trust that citizens had in science. Physicians were at a loss to prescribe effective treatments; racial and gender divides grew as misunderstandings about the spread of disease exacerbated existing stereotypes; and fear of contagion threatened to collapse the kind of community support that had helped the nation endure past hardships. Simultaneously, the rise of public health care employed the rhetoric of opportunity and optimism, further destabilizing social boundaries as the death rate climbed. A combination of media emphasis on looking toward the future and a public call for increased funding for new scientific research assisted in whitewashing the deep sense of loss and despair that afflicted most Americans as they dealt with the aftermath of the pandemic. Bristow, whose great-grandparents succumbed to influenza in 1920, writes with depth and feeling. By researching dozens of primary sources, she reveals the human circumstances and personal stories behind the history of this tragic era. It's a much-needed addendum to pandemic literature and an important perspective to understand as new and ever-evolving flu strains hover over our collective understanding of disease. 

Nonfiction Book Group March 2018

Please join the Nonfiction Book Group to discuss:

Also available in: e-book

May 1940 was a month like no other, as the German war machine blazed into France while the supposedly impregnable Maginot Line crumbled, and Winston Churchill replaced Neville Chamberlain as prime minister in an astonishing political drama as Britain, isolated and alone, faced a triumphant Nazi Germany. Against this vast historical canvas, Michael Korda relates what happened and why, and also tells his own story, that of a six-year-old boy in a glamorous movie family who would himself be evacuated. 

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Lunch and a Book March 2018

Please join Lunch and a Book to discuss the 2017-18 Great Michigan Read. 

X : a novel by Ilyasah Shabazz
Also available in: e-book

 No life is set in stone. Malcolm was a young man with boundless potential but with the odds stacked against him. Losing his father under suspicious circumstances and his mother to a mental health hospital, Malcolm fell into a life of petty crime and eventually prison. Instead of letting prison be his downfall, Malcom found a religion, a voice, and the podium that would eventually make him one of the most prominent figures in the burgeoning Civil Rights movement.

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Books