Kids Book Lists

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If you enjoyed reading about Nanea Mitchell, the American Girl character from Honolulu in 1941, you might be interested in some of these titles about Hawaii, WWII, kids looking to do good, and more.

Fiction

A new arrival by Anna Alter
Also available in: e-book

The animals who live in the apartment building on Sprout Street have a new neighbor, Mili, who just moved in from Hawaii.

March 23 is National Puppy Day! Puppies are so incredibly cute and irresistible, how can we not celebrate them?! There are all sorts of ways to celebrate National Puppy Day but if you need some ideas, click here for a list from a local news website. Want to learn more? Check out some materials from our pet collection!

Meet Patriot, Potomac, Primrose, Poppet, and Phil, five spirited puppies who, from the moment they're born, begin an incredible journey to become guide dogs for the blind. It's a rigorous two-year process that will take the pups from the care of selfless foster volunteers to specialized trainers to, if they make the cut, a lifelong human companion.

The dogist puppies by Elias Weiss Friedman

The Dogist Puppies, the follow-up to the New York Times bestseller The Dogist, is a beautiful, funny, and endearing look at puppies. He fires up the Nikon. Fills his pockets with treats. Dresses in special gear--pants with built-in kneepads and shoes that are not only made for walking but also have a thick rubber toe for squatting. And last but not least, he packs a squeaky tennis ball. And then The Dogist is off, combing the streets in his quest to find dogs to photograph. Or, as has been the case for the past four years, puppies. Bringing his singular eye and sensibility to photographing puppies from birth to age one, Elias Weiss Friedman, aka The Dogist, captures hundreds of fuzzy faces to love and little furry bodies to covet. The Dogist Puppies is a celebration of oversize puppy paws and floppy puppy ears, puppies getting belly rubs and puppies unsure, exactly, of what that tail thing is for. Puppies at play, and puppies worn out from playing. Litters of puppies with their mom, and puppies with their human equivalents--children. Puppies in fancy outfits, and those poignant puppies having to wear the "cone of shame." Friedman has also taken a deep dive into breeds: Border Collies and Westies, Frenchies and Huskies, Boxers and the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever, whose tender gaze looks just a little worried--perhaps concerned about living up to that name. The Dogist's new focus is on puppies. What more do you need to know?

Every year on March 21 since 2012, we celebrate World Down Syndrome Day. It's a global call to action to help raise awareness for those with Down Syndrome. For special needs parents, it becomes a life-long quest to advocate for acceptance and to make world a more inclusive and accessible place. To learn more, this article by a mom whose son has Down Syndrome is very illuminating. Here's some resources to peruse from our collection.

Based on The New York Times bestseller by Andrew Solomon, an intimate, profoundly human look at families raising children society deems 'abnormal': a mother and son determined to show the world that his Down syndrome does not define him; a couple learning to communicate with their bright but nonverbal autistic son; a young woman dealing with what it means to be the only little person in her family; and parents whose love for their son persists even after he has committed an unspeakable crime.

As a parent of a child diagnosed with Down syndrome, you may be feeling unsure of what to do next or where your child's journey will take you. In this book, authors Jen Jacob and Mardra Sikora share their experiences and guide you through life with Ds with expert advice from diagnosis to adulthood. Each page teaches you ways to support your child through major milestones; nurture their development; and ensure that they succeed behaviorally, socially, and cognitively. You'll also find valuable information on:

  • Sharing the news with loved ones
  • Transitioning into primary school
  • Developing your child's social skills
  • Discussing future opportunities, including employment and housing options

With The Parent's Guide to Down Syndrome, you will have the tools you need to raise a happy, healthy, and thriving child.

 

Looking for something to spark a discussion of kindness, or even to inspire you or your family to commit more acts of kindness? Try one of these movies. Titles geared to younger audiences are listed first.

Kindness Is Contagious is a film about being nice and the benefits of being nice. The film profiles cutting-edge scientists and best-selling authors as well as people from all walks of life; illustrating their incredible discovery: NICE GUYS FINISH FIRST!

Also available in: print | e-book

A boy with a facial deformity, who enters a middle school after being homeschooled for his whole life, struggles to fit in and get accepted by his classmates.

Sometimes we just want to read about what's familiar or what's possible. Here are some suggestions for books that feature a high level of realism. You won't find many dragons or wizards or outer space adventures here, but you will find stories about things that really could happen. Books are suggested for Kindergarten, but remember that each Reader is different, and might find something interesting at another level.

Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman
Also available in: audiobook

Although a classmate says that she cannot play Peter Pan in the school play because she is black, Grace discovers that she can do anything she sets her mind to do.

And then it's spring by Julie Fogliano
Also available in: e-video

A young boy and his dog decide they have had enough of winter, so they resolve to plant a garden. Join them as they savor the anticipation of new growth. 

In our last Thursday Family Storytime for this session, we talked about Family. Do you have a large family or a small one? Who is in your family? Enjoy these stories from Storytime and beyond all about Family.

Stories and Songs from Storytime

To vaccinate or not to vaccinate, that seems to be a controversial topic among parents. The state of Michigan requires schoolchildren to be immunized from 14 contagious diseases, but it also allows exemptions. Measles is an especially potent virus. According to the CDC, there's been 101 cases reported of a measles outbreak in 10 states. The CDC has a link to a fact sheet for parents called Diseases and the Vaccines that Prevent them. Want to know more? Here's some books to help separate fact from fiction. 

One of the most important tools in the public health arsenal, vaccines are to thank for the global eradication of smallpox, and for allowing us to defeat the dire threat of infectious disease for more than one hundred years. Vaccine development is where scientists turn when faced with the frightening spread of new diseases like Zika, SARS, and Ebola. So if vaccines have proven to be such an effective tool, why are growing numbers of people questioning the wisdom of vaccinating children? Why have public-sector vaccine producers almost vanished? And can we trust the multinational corporations that increasingly dominate vaccine development and production? In this highly original and controversial new book, Stuart Blume argues that processes of globalization and unmet healthcare needs are eroding faith in the institutions producing and providing vaccines. He brings together short, readable histories of immunization practices over the past century, from the work of early pioneers such as Louis Pasteur and Robert Koch to the establishment of the World Health Organization and the introduction of genetic engineered vaccines. Focusing on today's "vaccine hesitancy," the book exposes the inadequacies of public health persuasion, and discusses what will be needed to restore parents' confidence. This is a timely history, one that not only sheds new light on the origins of our global vaccine crisis, but also points a way forward.

In 1994, Peter J. Hotez's nineteen-month-old daughter, Rachel, was diagnosed with autism. Dr. Hotez, a pediatrician-scientist who develops vaccines for neglected tropical diseases affecting the world's poorest people, became troubled by the decades-long rise of the influential anti-vaccine community and their inescapable narrative around childhood vaccines and autism. The alleged link between the two was first espoused in a fraudulent scientific paper, long since retracted, but the story shows no signs of letting up. As a result, we've seen deadly and disabling outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases around the country, and Texas, where Hotez lives, is at particular risk.

In Vaccines Did Not Cause Rachel's Autism, Hotez draws on his experiences as a pediatrician, vaccine scientist, and father of an autistic child. Outlining the arguments on both sides of the debate, he examines the science that refutes the concerns of the anti-vaccine movement, debunks current conspiracy theories alleging a cover-up by the CDC, and critiques the scientific community's failure to effectively communicate the facts about vaccines and autism to the general public, all while sharing his very personal story of raising a now-adult daughter with autism.

Farms do amazing things! They raise animals, grow food, and even let you visit sometimes. We had lots of fun talking about Farms in Storytime. Be sure to check out these great books we read plus some of the extra suggestions too.

Stories and Songs from Storytime

 

Sometimes we just want to read about what's familiar or what's possible. Here are some suggestions for books that feature a high level of realism. You won't find many dragons or wizards or outer space adventures here, but you will find stories about things that really could happen. Books are suggested for First Grade, but since every Reader is different, you might find something interesting at another level. For more suggestions, you can always ask a librarian.

And two boys booed by Judith Viorst

On the day of the talent show, a boy is ready to sing his song, and he isn't one bit scared because he has practiced a billion times, plus he's wearing his lucky blue boots and his pants with all ten pockets. But as all of the other kids perform before him, he gets more and more nervous. 

Barkus by Patricia MacLachlan
Also available in: e-book

Barkus is a large and very smart dog who comes to live with seven-year-old Nicky when Nicky's Uncle Everton goes traveling--and soon he is a family and school favorite.

For more Barkus, check out Dog Dreams.

It may have been desperately cold outside, but we were cozy and warm in Storytime today as we talked about food. Do you have a favorite food? Enjoy these stories and songs from Storytime as you ponder what your favorite food is.

Stories and Songs from Storytime

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