Missing Baseball?

Although baseball is out of action indefinitely, you can still follow the Detroit Tigers 2020 season! Simulated games are being played on MLB the Show 20 as provided by the Detroit Free Press. You can also visit mlb.com to watch some classic baseball games of the past. Meanwhile, catch up on some good reading and listening with some of the titles available from the Library's ebook collections.

At a 1931 barnstorming exhibition game in Tennessee, a seventeen-year-old pitcher for the Chattanooga Lookouts struck out Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig back to back. Her name was Jackie Mitchell-"organized baseball's first girl pitcher." On September 9, 1965, Sandy Koufax made baseball history by pitching his fourth perfect game. In July 1970, a stripper rushed onto the field at Riverfront Stadium to kiss Johnny Bench, temporarily disrupting a game attended by President Nixon and his family. These are just some of the great, quirky, and comic moments in the annals of baseball recorded in The Greatest Baseball Stories Ever Told.

The extraordinary story of the 1968 baseball season--when the game was played to perfection -even as the country was being pulled apart at the seams.

Beginning in 2002, when author Mario Impemba arrived in the Tigers broadcast booth and when the team had consecutive 100-loss seasons, the book details how, in just three shorts years, team president Dave Dombrowski and manager Jim Leyland led the Tigers to the American League pennant - a feat the Tigers repeated in 2012.

Wait Till Next Year is the story of a young girl growing up in the suburbs of New York in the 1950s, when owning a single-family home on a tree-lined street meant the realization of dreams, when everyone knew everyone else on the block, and the children gathered in the streets to play from sunup to sundown. The neighborhood was equally divided among Dodger, Giant, and Yankee fans, and the corner stores were the scenes of fierce and affectionate rivalries.

Baseball Between Us is the true story of a father-son road trip to visit every Major League Baseball stadium: 16 years, 32 ballparks and 43,000 miles together. Author Mike Luery - an award winning television news reporter - and his son Matt travel from California to Maine - capturing every big league stadium.This is the story of a father/son team who embrace baseball as their roadmap to figure out the lessons of life. 

Also available in: audiobook

An in-depth look at the most valuable commodity in sports the pitching arm and how its vulnerability to injury is hurting players and the game, from Little League to the Majors.

Also available in: audiobook

Award-winning author Tom Stanton weaves a stunning tale of history, crime, and sports. Richly portraying 1930s America, Terror in the City of Champions features a pageant of colorful figures: iconic athletes, sanctimonious criminals, scheming industrial titans, a bigoted radio priest, a love-smitten celebrity couple, J. Edgar Hoover, and two future presidents, Gerald Ford and Ronald Reagan. It is a rollicking true story set at the confluence of hard luck, hope, victory, and violence.

The closer [electronic resource] by 1969- Mariano Rivera
Also available in: audiobook

Mariano Rivera never dreamed of becoming a professional athlete. He didn't grow up collecting baseball cards, playing Little League, or cheering on his home team at the World Series. He had never heard of Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio, or Mickey Mantle. One day, that all changed. From a childhood playing pickup games in Panama to an epic career with the New York Yankees, Mariano's rise to greatness has been anything but ordinary.

A fascinating and authoritative biography of perhaps the most controversial player in baseball history. Ty Cobb is baseball royalty, maybe even the greatest player who ever lived. His lifetime batting average is still the highest of all time, and when he retired in 1928, after twenty-one years with the Detroit Tigers and two with the Philadelphia Athletics, he held more than ninety records. But the numbers don't tell half of Cobb's tale.

At long last, the epic biography Ted Williams deserves-and that his fans have been waiting for. Williams was the best hitter in baseball history. His batting average of .406 in 1941 has not been topped since, and no player who has hit more than five hundred home runs has a higher career batting average. Those totals would have been even higher if Williams had not left baseball for nearly five years in the prime of his career to serve as a Marine pilot in World War II and Korea. While baseball might have been straightforward for Ted Williams, life was not. The Kid is biography of the highest literary order, a thrilling and honest account of a legend in all his glory and human complexity. In his final at-bat, Williams hit a home run. Bradlee's marvelous book clears the fences, too.