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Even More Bold, Courageous and Daring!

March is Women's History Month. Find out about the many brave and talented women who have influenced world history by reading some of these titles from the Library's collection:

Spyglass : an autobiography by Hélène Deschamps

In 1876 Sophia Duleep Singh was born into Indian royalty. Her father, Maharajah Duleep Singh, was heir to the Kingdom of the Sikhs, one of the greatest empires of the Indian subcontinent. It was a territory irresistible to the British, who plundered everything. Exiled to England, the dispossessed Maharajah transformed his estate in Suffolk into a Moghul palace. Sophia, god-daughter of Queen Victoria, was raised a genteel aristocratic Englishwoman and presented at court. But then, in secret defiance of the British government, she travelled to India, and returned a revolutionary, devoting herself to battling injustice and inequality. Her causes were the struggle for Indian Independence,  the welfare of Indian soldiers in the First World War--and, above all, the fight for female suffrage.

With the powerful Madame Chiang Kai-shek at the center of one of the great dramas of the 20th century, the story of the founding of modern China ranges from the revolution that swept away the monarchy to the eventual loss to the communists and exile in Taiwan.

In this instant New York Times bestseller, Misty Copeland makes history as the only African American soloist dancing with the prestigious American Ballet Theatre. But when she first placed her hands on the barre at an after-school community center, no one expected the undersized, anxious thirteen-year-old to become a groundbreaking ballerina. When she discovered ballet, Misty was living in a shabby motel room, struggling with her five siblings for a place to sleep on the floor. A true prodigy, she was dancing en pointe within three months of taking her first dance class and performing professionally in just over a year: a feat unheard of for any classical dancer.

Sixteenth-century Europe saw an explosion of female rule. Large swathes of the continent were under the firm hand of a dozen reigning women as queens, regents, mothers, wives, or counselors. From Isabella of Castile, her daughter Katherine of Aragon, and her granddaughter Mary Tudor, to Catherine de Medici, Anne Boleyn, and Elizabeth Tudor; from England and France to the Netherlands, and across the Holy Roman Empire, these women wielded enormous power over their territories, shaping the course of European history for over a century.

Spanning five centuries, details the lives of sixteen women who've made significant contributions to the fields of science and medicine.

The little-known true story of the unexpected and remarkable contributions to astronomy made by a group of women working in the Harvard College Observatory from the late 1800s through the mid-1900s.

At the height of the Great Depression, Sam Babb, the charismatic basketball coach of tiny Oklahoma Presbyterian College, began dreaming. Like so many others, he wanted a reason to have hope. Traveling from farm to farm, he recruited talented, hardworking young women and offered them a chance at a better life: a free college education if they would play for his basketball team. Despite their fears of leaving home and the sacrifices faced by their families, the women followed Babb and his dream. He shaped the Cardinals into a formidable team, and something extraordinary began to happen: with passion for the game and loyalty to one another and their coach, they won every game.

Lab girl by Hope Jahren

Comments

The spy wore red  by Aline, Countess of Romanones. Biographical account of a young woman spying for the OSS during WWII.