Internet usage among older adults lags behind younger user and many older adults cite the lack of relevancy to their lives as a reason for not going online.  However, internet usage by older adults has been slowly increasing and websites written by and for older adults are available. Websites challenging readers to decide what is ageist are Ashley Appleton's  Yo, Is this ageist? , Dr. Bill Thomas' Changing Aging discusses alternative care options, and Senior Planet  encourages aging with an attitude.

Several major films being released this fall and winter are based on true events. Find out more about them in the Library's collection of books and documentaries.

The Birth of a Nation.  Based on Nat Turner's 1831 slave uprising. Starring Nate Parker, Armie Hammer, Aja Naomi King, and Aunjanue Ellis. Release date October 7. Suggested reading: Nat Turner: a slave rebellion in history and memory and The rebellious slave: Nat Turner in American memory by Scot French.

Deepwater Horizon. Based on the 2010 oil rig explosion off the coast of Louisiana. Starring Mark Wahlberg, Kurt Russell, and Kate Hudson. Release date September 30. Suggested reading: Drowning in oil: BP and the reckless pursuit of profit by Loren C. Steffy. Suggested viewing: The spill.

Denial. Writer and historian Deborah Lipstadt is sued for libel by Holocaust denier David Irving. Starring Rachel Weisz, Andrew Scott, and Timothy Spall. Release date September 30. Suggested reading: History on trial: my day in court with Holocaust denier David Irving by Deborah E. Lipstadt and Denying the Holocaust: the growing assault on truth and memory by Deborah E. Lipstadt, and Lying about Hitler: history, Holocaust, and the David Irving trial by Richard J. Evans.

There is something about a non-fiction book that challenges people to change, to reflect upon their lives, to explore new worlds...

'Grunt' tackles the science behind some of a soldier's most challenging adversaries-- panic, exhaustion, heat, noise-- and introduces us to the scientists who seek to conquer them.

The story of the gene begins in earnest in an obscure Augustinian abbey in Moravia in 1856 where Gregor Mendel, a monk working with pea plants, stumbles on the idea of a "unit of heredity." It intersects with Darwin's theory of evolution, and collides with the horrors of Nazi eugenics in the 1940s. The gene transforms postwar biology. It invades discourses concerning race and identity and provides startling answers to some of the most potent questions coursing through our political and cultural realms. It reorganizes our understanding of sexuality, gender identity, sexual orientation, temperament, choice, and free will, thus raising the most urgent questions affecting our personal realms. Above all, the story of the gene is driven by human ingenuity and obsessive minds-- from Mendel and Darwin to Francis Crick, James Watson, and Rosalind Franklin to the thousands of scientists working today to understand the code of codes. Woven through the book is the story of Mukherjee's own family and its recurring pattern of schizophrenia, a haunting reminder that the science of genetics is not confined to the laboratory but is vitally relevant to everyday lives. The moral complexity of genetics reverberates even more urgently today as we learn to "read" and "write" the human genome-- unleashing the potential to change the fates and identities of our children and our children's children .

Eric Liddell's story as the Olympic gold medalist was told in the Academy Award winning film Chariots of Fire. Liddell would not run on Sunday because of his strict observance of the Christian sabbath, and so he did not compete in his signature event at the 1924 Paris Olympics. Yet Liddell triumped in a new event and won a gold medal. Liddell ran - and lived - for the glory of his God. After the Olympics, he dedicated himself to missionary work in China. He and thousands of other westerners were eventually interned at a Japanese work camp. Once imprisoned, Liddell did what he was born to do, practice his faith and his sport..

You can learn how to speak Pirate and many other languages through Mango Languages all with your Canton Public Library card. 

Also available in: e-book | e-audiobook | large print

"This is what we long for: the profound pleasure of being swept into vivid new worlds, worlds peopled by characters so intriguing and real that we can't shake them, even long after the reading's done. In his earlier, award-winning novels, Dominic Smith demonstrated a gift for coaxing the past to life. Now, in The Last Painting of Sara de Vos, he deftly bridges the historical and the contemporary, tracking a collision course between a rare landscape by a female Dutch painter of the golden age, an inheritor of the work in 1950s Manhattan, and a celebrated art historian who painted a forgery of it in her youth. In 1631, Sara de Vos is admitted as a master painter to the Guild of St. Luke's in Holland, the first woman to be so recognized. Three hundred years later, only one work attributed to de Vos is known to remain--a haunting winter scene, At the Edge of a Wood, which hangs over the bed of a wealthy descendant of the original owner. An Australian grad student, Ellie Shipley, struggling to stay afloat in New York, agrees to paint a forgery of the landscape, a decision that will haunt her. Because now, half a century later, she's curating an exhibit of female Dutch painters, and both versions threaten to arrive. As the three threads intersect, The Last Painting of Sara de Vos mesmerizes while it grapples with the demands of the artistic life, showing how the deceits of the past can forge the present"--.

Also available in: e-book

Advances in technology are creating the next economy and enabling us to make things/do things/connect with others in smarter, cheaper, faster, more effective ways. But the price of this progress has been a decoupling of the engine of prosperity from jobs that have been the means by which people have ascended to (and stayed in) the middle class. Andy Stern, the former president of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) spent four years traveling the country and asking economists, futurists, labor leaders, CEOs, investment bankers, entrepreneurs, and political leaders to help picture the U.S. economy 25 to 30 years from now. He vividly reports on people who are analyzing and creating this new economy--such as investment banker Steve Berkenfeld; David Cote, the CEO of Honeywell International; Andy Grove of Intel; Carl Camden, the CEO of Kelly Services; and Geoffrey Canada of the Harlem Children's Zone. Through these stories, we come to a stark and deeper understanding of the toll technological progress will continue to take on jobs and income and its inevitable effect on tens of millions of people. But there is hope for our economy and future. The foundation of economic prosperity for all Americans, Stern believes, is a universal basic income. The idea of a universal basic income for all Americans is controversial but American attitudes are shifting. Stern has been a game changer throughout his career, and his next goal is to create a movement that will force the political establishment to take action against something that many on both the right and the left believe is inevitable. Stern's plan is bold, idealistic, and challenging--and its time has come.

n the early nineteenth century, the United States turned its idealistic gaze southward, imagining a legacy of revolution and republicanism it hoped would dominate the American hemisphere. From pulsing port cities to Midwestern farms and southern plantations, an adolescent nation hailed Latin America's independence movements as glorious tropical reprises of 1776. Even as Latin Americans were gradually ending slavery, U.S. observers remained energized by the belief that their founding ideals were triumphing over European tyranny among their "sister republics." But as slavery became a violently divisive issue at home, goodwill toward antislavery revolutionaries waned. By the nation's fiftieth anniversary, republican efforts abroad had become a scaffold upon which many in the United States erected an ideology of white U.S. exceptionalism that would haunt the geopolitical landscape for generations. Marshaling groundbreaking research in four languages, Caitlin Fitz defines this hugely significant, previously unacknowledged turning point in U.S. history.

Reading Buddies

Reading makes you feel good.--Todd Parr

Make a new friend at our Reading Buddies Program! You will be paired up with a Tween Volunteer Buddy and get the chance to practice your reading in a fun and cozy atmosphere. Readers need to be in grades Kindergarten through Third Grade and are welcome to bring a book of their own to read aloud or read one of ours! We will have two meetings this fall, October 12, 2016 and December 14, 2016. 

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Wonder Woman 75th Anniversary Party

The Invisible Jet has landed! Celebrate Wonder Woman's 75th Anniversary at our awesome superhero party! There will be fun games, crafts, a photo area, snack. The party is on Wednesday night, October 19, 2016 and is open to superheroes age five to eleven years old with a caregiver. Costumes welcome! Registration required.

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Bollywood Film Festival

Celebrate the start of Diwali with a Bollywood Film Festival. Come for all or part of the day. All are welcome, no registration.

10:00 am: 3 Idiots 
From the moment he arrives at India's most prestigious university, Rancho's outlandish schemes turn the campus upside down-along with the lives of his two newfound best friends. Together, they make life miserable for 'Virus, ' the school's uptight and heartless dean. 

1:00 pm The Lunchbox 
A mistaken delivery in Mumbai's lunchbox delivery system leads to a connection between a young housewife to an older man.

3:00 pm Chakde! India

Kabir Khan (Shahrukh Khan), the unfairly-disgraced ex-captain of the Indian National Men's Hockey Team, redeems himself by coaching the squabbling, newly-created, National Women's Hockey Team to World Cup victory.

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Genealogy @ Your Library: Cemeteries and Census

Census and cemetery records are two of the most common resources for finding genealogy information and can be accessed through your own computer.  However, knowing what you are looking for and how to use these records to full advantage is key.  Join Barbara Snow of the Washtenaw County Genealogical Society as she shows tips and tricks for getting the most out of your genealogy research.  

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.