On Saturday, April 29 from 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM, area families with at-risk and special populations are invited to this FREE event at the Summit on the Park. You can meet Canton and Plymouth first responders including public safety officers, firefighters and paramedics. Also enjoy hands-on displays, ask questions, and learn about local programs and resources for everyone. Refreshments available for purchase. The Summit is located at 46000 Summit Parkway in Canton. For more information, please call (734) 394-5367 or email cantontr@canton-mi.org. Program presented in partnership with Canton Public Safety, Canton Leisure Services, and Plymouth-Canton Community Schools.

 

"The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it"  -- Neil De Grasse Tyson.

 

March for Science   April 22, 2017

 

Hey Kids,

You may have seen or heard the news that we have new eggs in our library nest. Mother ducks were spotted laying eggs in our Children's Department courtyard again, and if all goes well we look forward to welcoming baby ducks. While we wait for further action, might I suggest looking for a few ducky stories? Some recommendations - both fiction and nonfiction - are below. If you find one you especially enjoy, I bet the ducks in the courtyard (or me, the big friendly bear right next to them) might enjoy listening to you read it.

Bear hugs,

Thorndyke

Ducklings by Marfe Ferguson Delano

Introduces wood ducks, describing their life cycle, physical characteristics, diet, and behaviors.

Watch me grow duckling by Lisa Magloff

Shows the duck as it grows up in its natural environment.

Just a few decades ago, the Koreans were an impoverished, agricultural people. In one generation they moved from the fields to Silicon Valley. The nature and values of the Korean people provide the background for a more detailed examination of the complex history of the country, in particular its division and its emergence as an economic superpower.

A young writer's sincere search (with his dog) for an authentic life--buying a ruined house in Detroit for $500, fixing it up nail by nail, and, in the process, participating in the grassroots rebirth of the city itself.

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Erica Rakowicz
rakowicze@cantonpl.org
Communication Specialist, Community Relations
Canton Public Library
734-397-0999 ext. 1245

 

CPL Recognizes Volunteers with President’s Volunteer Service Awards

CANTON, MI –  The Canton Public Library celebrated volunteers who contributed 8,452 service hours with a luncheon on April 18. Staff prepared food to honor the 89 volunteers who spend their time at CPL shelving books, processing library materials, watering plants and more.

Volunteers were also recognized with the President’s Volunteer Service Award, from the President’s Council on Service and Civic Participation, by library trustees Michelle Farell and Nancy Eggenberger.

The award given for the most time contributed is the Lifetime Achievement Award, given to volunteers who have contributed over 4,000 hours of service to the library in their lifetime. Bronze, Silver and Gold awards were also given to volunteers.

“That’s just amazing and that’s a lot of dedication to the library, so we want to give a special thank you to these people,” Farell said, before presenting the Lifetime Achievement Awards.

The following recipients exceeded the number of hours required for each level of the award:

Gold: Linda Luke and Kathy Young
Silver: Deb Luczkowski, Shirley Reynolds, Judy Richardson, Nancy Smith and Linda Wisniewski
Bronze: Nancy Austin, Barb Backes , Melinda Drake, Linda Garrett, Larry Hoelscher, Lisa Kluka, John MacGaw, Claire O’Connor, Loretta Olson, Larry Richardson, David Smith, Kathy Sonnanstine, Jody Trame, Joan Postell and Debbe Yeager
Lifetime Achievement: Bevis Richardson and Ilene Saunders

Additional facts about the 2016 President’s Volunteer Service Award winners:

In 2011, the first year the Canton Public Library gave out the awards, CPL gave out 11 Bronze Awards. This year, CPL gave out 27 Bronze Awards.
Award winners alone donated 5,077 volunteer hours to the library in 2016.
Three of the award winners were teens, ages 11-15. Two teens won Silver Awards for 75-99 hours and one teen won a Bronze Award for 50-74 hours.
Two winners were young adults, ages 16-25. One young adult won a Silver Award for 175-249 hours and one young adult won a Bronze Award for 100-174 hours.
Thirty-three adults, ages 26 and up, won Bronze, Silver and Gold awards. Twenty-five adults won Bronze Awards for 100-249 hours, five adults won Silver Awards for 250-499 hours, and three adults won Gold Awards for 500+ hours.

 

The Canton Public Library is located at 1200 S. Canton Center Rd. Learn more about the library by visiting www.cantonpl.org or by calling the library at 734-397-0999.

 

 

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In this definitive biography, veteran sportswriter Tom Callahan shines a spotlight on one of the greatest golfers ever to play the game.

Nevertheless : a memoir by Alec Baldwin

The Lowells of Massachusetts were a remarkable family. They were settlers in the New World in the 1600s, revolutionaries creating a new nation in the 1700s, merchants and manufacturers building prosperity in the 1800s, and scientists and artists flourishing in the 1900s. For the first time, Nina Sankovitch tells the story of this fascinating and powerful dynasty

In Being Mortal, bestselling author Atul Gawande tackles the hardest challenge of his profession: how medicine can not only improve life but also the process of its ending Medicine has triumphed in modern times, transforming birth, injury, and infectious disease from harrowing to manageable. But in the inevitable condition of aging and death, the goals of medicine seem too frequently to run counter to the interest of the human spirit. Nursing homes, preoccupied with safety, pin patients into railed beds and wheelchairs. Hospitals isolate the dying, checking for vital signs long after the goals of cure have become moot. Doctors, committed to extending life, continue to carry out devastating procedures that in the end extend suffering. Gawande, a practicing surgeon, addresses his profession's ultimate limitation, arguing that quality of life is the desired goal for patients and families. Gawande offers examples of freer, more socially fulfilling models for assisting the infirm and dependent elderly, and he explores the varieties of hospice care to demonstrate that a person's last weeks or months may be rich and dignified. Full of eye-opening research and riveting storytelling, Being Mortal asserts that medicine can comfort and enhance our experience even to the end, providing not only a good life but also a good end. CPL's Lunch and a Book Group gave this title 4.7 stars out of 5. This kit contains 10 copies of the title.

 

In case you missed our Rain storytime this week, don't worry. Here are some of the fun stories and songs we shared, plus some extras to do your own stormy storytime at home.

From Storytime

Raindrops roll by April Pulley Sayre

In her latest gorgeously photo-illustrated nonfiction picture book, celebrated author April Pulley Sayre sheds new light on the wonders of rain, from the beauty of a raindrop balanced on a leaf to the amazing, never-ending water cycle that keeps our planet in perfect ecological balance.

 

IT AIN'T GONNA RAIN NO MORE (From jbrary)

          It ain’t gonna rain no more, no more, it ain’t gonna rain no more…

          Oh, no! It’s up to my toe! But it ain’t gonna rain no more.

          (repeat with:

                    Oh gee! It’s up to my knee!

                    Oh, my! It’s up to my thigh!

                    Oh, fiddle! It’s up to my middle!

                    Oh, blech! It’s up to my neck!)

          Finish with: Oh, dread! It’s up to my head! So I guess I’ll just swim home…

"Nearly seventy-five years ago, Donald Triplett of Forest, Mississippi became the first child diagnosed with autism. Beginning with his family's odyssey, In a Different Key tells the extraordinary story of this often misunderstood condition, and of the civil rights battles waged by the families of those who have it. Unfolding over decades, it is a beautifully rendered history of ordinary people determined to secure a place in the world for those with autism--by liberating children from dank institutions, campaigning for their right to go to school, challenging expert opinion on what it means to have autism, and persuading society to accept those who are different. It is the story of women like Ruth Sullivan, who rebelled against a medical establishment that blamed cold and rejecting "refrigerator mothers" for causing autism; and of fathers who pushed scientists to dig harder for treatments. Many others played starring roles too: doctors like Leo Kanner, who pioneered our understanding of autism; lawyers like Tom Gilhool, who took the families' battle for education to the courtroom; scientists who sparred over how to treat autism; and those with autism, like Temple Grandin, Alex Plank, and Ari Ne'eman, who explained their inner worlds and championed the philosophy of neurodiversity. This is also a story of fierce controversies--from the question of whether there is truly an autism "epidemic," and whether vaccines played a part in it; to scandals involving "facilitated communication," one of many treatments that have proved to be blind alleys; to stark disagreements about whether scientists should pursue a cure for autism. There are dark turns too: we learn about experimenters feeding LSD to children with autism, or shocking them with electricity to change their behavior; and the authors reveal compelling evidence that Hans Asperger, discoverer of the syndrome named after him, participated in the Nazi program that consigned disabled children to death. By turns intimate and panoramic, In a Different Key takes us on a journey from an era when families were shamed and children were condemned to institutions to one in which a cadre of people with autism push not simply for inclusion, but for a new understanding of autism: as difference rather than disability"--.

Senator (Making Peace with Autism) hits the nail on the head once again with this work that shares her continuing journey as the parent of an adult with autism. Parents often worry about who will care for their children should they no longer be able, but that concern lessens once children are grown and out on their own. Parents of children with autism, however, must address their fears and seek answers to such a scenario before and into their child's adulthood. Senator tells her experience helping her son, Nat, find a living situation that will support his needs and allow him to be a part of the community. She also relates stories of 30 other families, and the solutions they have found for their children with autism. By explaining how she and others in similar situations manage on a daily basis, the author encourages parents to seek new resolutions in addition to available options for their child.

In this fascinating biography, Annette Wood delves deep into Grandin's life from childhood to adulthood. Wood tells of the trials and tribulations of the icon: What difficulties Grandin struggled with and how she's become a hero for the autistic community. She also tells what Temple has done since the movie came out, where she is today, what kind of difference she's made, and what her future holds. For the 22 million people worldwide afflicted by autism and the countless friends and family members who support them, this brilliant portrait presents an up-close look at the disorder and renewed hope for what the future could bring for those on all levels of the spectrum. -- Amazon.com.

"A scientifically developed program for feeding kids with special needs--based on the popular Brain Balance Program Dr. Robert Melillo's Brain Balance program has helped thousands of families across the country, offering a drug-free, scientifically based method for addressing a wide range of conditions, including autism spectrum disorders and ADHD. In this new book, he presents the nutritional side of the Brain Balance Program, featuring guidelines, tips, and kid-friendly recipes based on the latest scientific research on how food affects the brain. Designed to help busy parents feed picky kids in a beneficial way, the book will show readers how to: Recognize the difference between a fussy eater and a problem eater. Ease the sensory issues that make for mealtime mayhem. Identify food sensitivities using a simple elimination diet. Choose supplements that will help ensure adequate daily amounts of the specific vitamins and minerals important to brain health. Prepare delicious, healthy meals that will pass the taste test of even the most finicky eaters. Understand how the brain plays a primary role in many dietary and nutritional issue including food sensitivities"--.

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