Below you will find a suggestions of crossover titles. Stories that are told in verse: not rhyming poems and not dense prose, these books live in their own category. Click on each title for description and availability.

Another day as Emily by Eileen Spinelli

Susie is jealous when her brother is deemed a town hero, so she finds solace in the poetry and reclusive lifestyle of Emily Dickinson.

Little cat's luck by Marion Dane Bauer
Also available in: e-book

A little cat named Patches manages to push out a window screen and leave her house, chasing a falling leaf, and sets out to find a special place to call her own.

Learn about real life poets and their work. The stories included below are roughly listed by increasing depth and complexity. While these books are located in the Children's Department, there is a strong possibility that they may appeal to a wider audience.

Maya Angelou by Lisbeth Kaiser

Offers an illustrated telling of the life of Maya Angelou that focuses on how she overcame childhood trauma and realized her dream and became one of the world's most beloved writers and speakers.

Presents the life and work of the twentieth-century American writer, focusing on his fascination with words from a young age and highlighting his poetry's inspirational properties.

From short rhymes to epic poems, we have a few graphic novels that feature a variety of poetry and poetic adaptations.

Presents fifty traditional nursery rhymes in comic book format, with illustrations by well-known cartoonists.

Sita's Ramayana by Samhita Arni

A graphic novel adaptation of the ancient Indian legend in which Rama, an incarnation of the god Vishnu, forces his wife Sita to undergo an ordeal by fire to prove she is pure after she is abducted by Ravanna.

Explore our resources for instruction and inspiration for your poetry writing. More advanced titles can be found at the bottom of the list.

Photographs and text introduce techniques and tips for writing poetry inspired by pictures and images, discussing word choices, and examining layout, metaphores, and related topics.

Maybe you're not feeling like a poem, but a nice fiction book about a poet sounds appealing. Try one of the following titles.

A poet's bird garden by Laura Nyman Montenegro

After Chirpie the bird escapes from her cage and flies into a tree, a group of poets decides that the best way to entice her down is to create a garden full of seeds, water, hiding places, and materials for building a nest.

The poet upstairs by Judith Ortiz Cofer

When a poet moves into the apartment above hers, young Juliana asks to meet her and together they write poems of tropical birds and a river that flows to the sea, typing out words that change the world, if only for a while.

Many books that hold poetry live on the nonfiction shelves between J808.81J811 and J821, but don't forget that poems live all over the library. Below are a few illustrated poems that require a little more exploration to find. While all are located within the Children's Department, they may have a wider appeal. Click on each title for location and availability information.

 

Simple poetic language and close-up photographs invite readers to join two fireflies as they try to find each other among the many flashing firefly lights on a summer evening.

The land of nod by Robert Louis Stevenson

A young boy explores the magical dreamworld he goes to when he falls asleep.

In case you missed our Fruits and Veggies storytime at Fresh Thyme this week, don't worry. Here are some of the fun stories and songs we shared, plus some extras to do your own healthy eating storytime at home.

From Storytime

 

IF YOU LIKE CARROTS AND YOU KNOW IT (Adapted from "If you're happy and you know it")

     If you like carrots and you know it, clap your hands.

     If you like carrots and you know it, clap your hands.

     If you like carrots and you know it, and you really want to show it, 

     If you like carrots and you know it, clap your hands.

     (Repeat with: broccoli/stomp your feet; squash/shout hurray; cabbage/dance around)

 

 

NPM Poster

Join us to celebrate National Poetry Month and pick up an activity sheet at one of our reference desks during the month of April. It's a great way to reacquaint yourself with favorite poets or introduce yourself to something new. Don't limit yourself to just April, though. Use our poetry suggestions below to enjoy poetry all year long.

Most poetry books can be found in the nonfiction shelves in the 800s - in the Children's, Teen, or Adult Collection. Other suggestions for exploring poetry are included below. 

 

 

March is Music in our Schools Month. Music makers come from all cultures and backgrounds, and sometimes the music we enjoy the most comes from surprising sources. Check out some of the musicians and composers featured below. When possible, links to their music are also listed. 

A one-hundredth birthday tribute to the late jazz artist explores his observations about humanity's discriminatory and violent behaviors as well as his efforts to forge world peace through music with the Sun Ra Arkestra.

Listen: The Futuristic Sounds of Sun Ra

Describes how Juan García Esquivel, a Mexican composer popular in the 1950s and 1960s, developed his experimental style of music, based on mariachi and other Mexican music, jazz, the human voice, and the use of unusual instruments.

Listen: Nuevo (featuring Jean Garcia Esquivel)

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