Who really benefits from urban revival? Cities, from trendy coastal areas to the nation's heartland, are seeing levels of growth beyond the wildest visions of only a few decades ago. But vast areas in the same cities house thousands of people living in poverty who see little or no new hope or opportunity. Even as cities revive, they are becoming more unequal and more segregated. What does this mean for these cities--and the people who live in them? In The Divided City, urban practitioner and scholar Alan Mallach shows us what has happened over the past 15 to 20 years in industrial cities like Pittsburgh, Detroit, Cleveland, and Baltimore, as they have undergone unprecedented, unexpected revival. He draws from his decades of experience working in America's cities, and pulls in insightful research and data, to spotlight these changes while placing them in their larger economic, social, and political context. Mallach explores the pervasive significance of race in American cities and looks closely at the successes and failures of city governments, nonprofit entities, and citizens as they have tried to address the challenges of change. The Divided City offers strategies to foster greater equality and opportunity. Mallach makes a compelling case that these strategies must be local in addition to being concrete and focusing on people's needs education, jobs, housing and quality of life. Change, he argues, will come city by city, not through national plans or utopian schemes. This is the first book to provide a comprehensive, grounded picture of the transformation of America's older industrial cities. It is neither a dystopian narrative nor a one-sided "the cities are back" story, but a balanced picture rooted in the nitty-gritty reality of these cities. The Divided City is imperative for anyone who cares about cities and who wants to understand how to make today's urban revival work for everyone.--Amazon.com.

"A unique, revelatory portrait of small-town America: the activities, changes, and events that shape this mostly unseen part of our national landscape, and the issues and concerns that matter to the ordinary Americans who make these towns their home. For the last five years, James and Deborah Fallows have been traveling across America in a single-prop airplane, visiting small cities and meeting civic leaders, factory workers, recent immigrants, and young entrepreneurs, seeking to take the pulse and discern the outlook of an America that is unreported and unobserved by the national media. Attending town meetings, breakfasts at local coffee shops, and events at local libraries, they have listened to the challenges and problems that define American lives today. Our Towns is the story of their journey--an account of their visits to twenty-one cities and towns: the individuals they met, the stories they heard, and their portrait of the many different faces of the American future"--.

"How will climate change affect our lives? Where will its impacts be most deeply felt? Are we doing enough to protect ourselves from the coming chaos? In Extreme Cities, Ashley Dawson argues that cities are ground zero for climate change, contributing the lion's share of carbon to the atmosphere, while also lying on the frontlines of rising sea levels. Today, the majority of the world's megacities are located in coastal zones, yet few of them are adequately prepared for the floods that will increasingly menace their shores. Instead, most continue to develop luxury waterfront condos for the elite and industrial facilities for corporations. These not only intensify carbon emissions, but also place coastal residents at greater risk when water levels rise. In Extreme Cities, Dawson offers an alarming portrait of the future of our cities, describing the efforts of Staten Island, New York, and Shishmareff, Alaska residents to relocate; Holland's models for defending against the seas; and the development of New York City before and after Hurricane Sandy. Our best hope lies not with fortified sea walls, he argues. Rather, it lies with urban movements already fighting to remake our cities in a more just and equitable way. As much a harrowing study as a call to arms Extreme Cities is a necessary read for anyone concerned with the threat of global warming, and of the cities of the world."--Publisher's description.

Unique, simple approach to the complicated college prep process, from the leading authority in college admissions. Getting ready for college is a complicated and confusing process -- how do you know when to take the SAT? When do you start applying to schools? What classes should you be taking to help prepare you for college-level work? Is there anything you should do before high school? Fiske Countdown to College is a comprehensive collection of simple, easy-to-use checklists that spell out your road map for each year of high school and make preparation for college a breeze. There are 28 "to-do" lists for parents and students, ten "don't" lists, three "top 10" lists, and two glossaries, divided by year, that walk you through high school to college. Quotes from students, parents, and counselors offer advice and support from people who've been through all of this before.

Every college and university has a story, and no one tells those stories like former New York Times education editor Edward B. Fiske. That's why, for 35 years, the Fiske Guide to Colleges has been the leading guide to 320+ four-year schools, including quotes from real students and information you won't find on college websites. Fully updated and expanded every year, Fiske is the most authoritative source of information for college-bound students and their parents. Helpful, honest, and straightforward, the Fiske Guide to Colleges delivers an insider's look at what it's really like to be a student at the "best and most interesting" schools in the United States, plus Canada, Great Britain, and Ireland--so you can find the best fits for you

The experts at The Princeton Review have been helping students, parents, and educators achieve the best results at every stage of the education process since 1981. The Princeton Review has helped millions succeed on standardized tests, and provides expert advice and instruction to help parents, teachers, students, and schools navigate the complexities of school admission. In addition to classroom courses in over 40 states and 20 countries, The Princeton Review also offers online and school-based courses, one-to-one and small-group tutoring as well as online services in both admission counseling and academic homework help.

Contemporary jazz-R&B funkster Brian Culbertson has had love on his mind essentially since last Valentine's Day. Inspired by the occasion of his twentieth wedding anniversary last fall, the keyboardist began writing thirteen new songs about a year ago dedicated to his wife, Michelle, which make up his "Colors of Love" album that was released on Wednesday, Valentine's Day, by BCM Entertainment. Substituting the live band instrumentation customary of his recordings, Culbertson crafted an intimate set of ardent acoustic piano melodies using sensual synth grooves and textures. 

The long anticipated second album is finally here. Guitarist Adam Hawley is a gifted performer, sideman, and educator, known for his lithe, groove-oriented approach to contemporary jazz and R&B. After working steadily for over a decade with many marquee jazz and pop artists, Hawley launched his solo career with his breakthrough 2016 debut album, Just the Beginning, which featured three chart-topping smooth jazz singles. And the new single - Can You Feel It? featuring Marcus Anderson - is already climbing up the Billboard chart. The album features a distinguished array of talent, i.e. Dave Koz, Jeff Lorber, Darren Rahn, Marcus Anderson and Greg Manning to name a few.

With eight of his own compositions, plus two top-notch reinventions, ‘Personal Touch’ from writer, producer and multi instrumentalist Vincent Ingala is the breath of fresh air that long time smooth jazz fans have been craving. Indeed it is arguably Vincent’s most complete album to date and affirms the meteoric progress he has made since 2011 when his debut recording ‘North End Soul’ first hit the streets. It was a collection that marked him out as one to watch and, since then, Smooth Jazz Therapy has watched his development with delighted interest. Personal Touch’ is Vincent’s fifth solo CD and right from the opening bars of the extremely edgy title cut there is little doubt he has lost none of his ability to effortlessly deliver a succession of joyously radio ready tunes. 

Do you love animals? Facebook and Instagram offers many furry friends you can follow. Oh, and some have even authored books too! ;-) How cool is that?! Check them out here!

This follow-up to Jenkins's best-selling memoir Esther the Wonder Pig picks up exactly where the first book left off, as Jenkins, his partner and coauthor Derek Walter, and their animal family make the move to a farm in Campbellville, Ontario. Using his trademark self-deprecating humor, Jenkins, aided by writer Caprice Crane and Walter, chronicles the zany misadventures that accompany their effort to transform the derelict farm into a successful sanctuary for rescues. Readers will share in the drama as Esther develops a "teenage" attitude and escapes the farm, challenges emerge with over-reaching volunteers, and Jenkins and Walter struggle with isolation and loneliness as they settle into country life far away from old friends and jobs. Jenkins is refreshingly candid about the huge learning curve that defined the sanctuary's early years and rightfully proud of its success (to date they have taken in more than 50 rescued animals). Includes 14 "Esther-approved" (vegan) recipes. 

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the Adult Contemporary Book Discussion Group! We've compiled a list of our favorite books over the years. Maybe your book club is looking for recommendations or maybe you are interested in joining our group. We meet every 3rd Monday of the month at 7PM in the Community Room. 

The nightingale by Kristin Hannah

"Viann and Isabelle have always been close despite their differences. Younger, bolder sister Isabelle lives in Paris while Viann lives a quiet and content life in the French countryside with her husband Antoine and their daughter. When World War II strikes and Antoine is sent off to fight, Viann and Isabelle's father sends Isabelle to help her older sister cope. As the war progresses, it's not only the sisters' relationship that is tested, but also their strength and their individual senses of right and wrong. With life as they know it changing in unbelievably horrific ways, Viann and Isabelle will find themselves facing frightening situations and responding in ways they never thought possible as bravery and resistance take different forms in each of their actions. Vivid and exquiste in its illumination of a time and place that was filled with great monstrosities, but also great humanity and strength, Kristin Hannah's novel will provoke thought and discussion that will have readers talking long after they turn the last page"--.

Famed aviator and renowned racehorse trainer Beryl Markham is only one of the subjects of McLain's captivating new novel. The other is Kenya, the country that formed the complicated, independent woman whom Markham would become. Like her father who raised her, she falls under the spell of Kenya's lush valleys and distant mountains. Here she nurtures her affinity for animals in the wild and learns to breed and tame the most recalcitrant thoroughbreds. But when war and weather affect life at their farm in Ngoro, Beryl's father pressures the 16-year-old into marrying a much older, financially stable neighbor, setting in motion Markham's long history of fleeing the constraints of relationships that threaten her keen desire to live life on her own terms. Only on the back of a horse, at the wheel of a car, or, later, flying over her beloved -Africa does she feel fully alive and free. Drawing on Markham's own memoir, West with the Night, McLain vividly introduces this enigmatic woman to a new generation of readers. 

July 15 is National I Love Horses Day! Today celebrates these majestic, magnificent animals and provides a great opportunity to learn more about them. There are over 350 breeds of horses and ponies throughout the world. Horses have been around for millions of years, but was only domesticated around 10,000 years ago. The horse-human connection is a special bond. Want to learn more? Check out one of these books from our pet collection or visit a local riding stable!

More than 1,700 entries as well as photos and drawings of running, jumping, and gamboling horses, equipment, and anatomy-on just about every page. The shortest entries are a single sentence, and most are between a paragraph and a page or more in length. Haas writes horse-themed fiction for young readers and has a pleasing and direct style in this nonfiction endeavor. She covers English and Western riding, the history of the horse, some basic equine medical issues, training terminology, and details about horse breeds and coloration.

The Adult Contemporary Book Discussion Group is celebrating its 30th Anniversary of bonding over great books! Many of the authors we've chosen through the years have published new titles! Here's a list of what to read next from Adult Contemporary authors and enjoy reading throughout the 62 Days of Summer! 

The great alone by Kristin Hannah

Lenora Allbright is thirteen when her father convinces her mother, Cora, to forgo their inauspicious existence in Seattle and move to Kaneq, AK. It's 1974, and the former Vietnam POW sees a better future away from the noise and nightmares that plague him. Having been left a homestead by a buddy who died in the war, Ernt is secure in his beliefs, but never was a family less prepared for the reality of Alaska, the long, cold winters and isolation. Locals want to help out, especially classmate Matthew Walker, who likes everything about Leni. Yet the harsh conditions bring out the worst in Ernt, whose paranoia takes over their lives and exacerbates what Leni sees as the toxic relationship between her parents. The Allbrights are as green as greenhorns can be, and even first love must endure unimaginable hardship and tragedy as the wilderness tries to claim more victims.

Us against you : a novel by Fredrik Backman

A small community tucked deep in the forest, Beartown is home to tough, hardworking people who don't expect life to be easy or fair. No matter how difficult times get, they've always been able to take pride in their local ice hockey team. So it's a cruel blow when they hear that Beartown ice hockey might soon be disbanded. What makes it worse is the obvious satisfaction that all the former Beartown players, who now play for a rival team in the neighboring town of Hed, take in that fact. As the tension mounts between the two adversaries, a newcomer arrives who gives Beartown hockey a surprising new coach and a chance at a comeback.

Do you love the great outdoors? Well, July is your month because it's National Parks and Recreation Month! There are parks all around Canton to discover and explore! Don't forget to check the Michigan Activity Pass before you hop on your bike or grab your backpack! And stop by our display and take the quiz for activity poms! Check out some great resources to get you started on your National Parks adventure!

The Complete Guide to the National Park Lodges is the only book of its kind-a definitive and practical resource covering all the lodges in America's national parks, from luxurious inns to rustic cabins. National parks experts David and Kay Scott reveal how to leave behind the headaches and make planning the trip of a lifetime painless. Having visited nearly every national park area and lodge in America, they share their sage advice on how to choose a lodge that will best suit your taste and your pocketbook. With beautiful full-color photographs and detailed maps to help you find your way there, The Complete Guide to the National Park Lodges is your key to experiencing America's treasured lands in comfort! 

Explore the crystal clear waters on the Summit Lakes Trail at Lassen Volcanic National Park, take in the expansive views at Shenandoah National Park's Old Rag Mountain, or traverse the sandstone cliffs at Angel's Landing in Zion National Park. Choose your adventure from any of the forty-four national parks profiled throughout the book. This book delivers jaw-dropping photos, detailed hike descriptions and maps, ranger essays, and more, all of which combine to create an intimate look at the best our national parks have to offer.

The NHS tutors are taking a break during the summer and will be back in the fall. But no worries. You can sharpen your test preparation skills by using the LearningExpress Library database! Go to the library's homepage and select databases. Scroll down to Online Learning and Test Preparation. Sign up and off you go! Studying for a nursing school entrance exam or a civil service exam? All that and more is covered in LearningExpress's Career Preparation Center. Need to study for the GED? The High School Equivalency Center has everything to get you started. Looking for college admission test or essay pointers? The College Admissions Test Preparation Center has ACT, SAT, PSAT, AP and TOEFL practice tests. Thinking of graduate school? Check the College Students Center for GMAT, GRE, MCAT, PCAT, LSAT and MAT exam prep. How about refining your writing skills? Then Adult Core Skills is what you need. LearningExpress Library is a great testing tool and it's one of the great perks of having a Canton library card!  

June is National Dairy Month! Americans love dairy products. We consume about 275 pounds of milk, cheese, yogurt, butter and ice cream a year! Consuming dairy products helps maintain healthy bones, teeth and gums throughout our lives. Nutrients found in dairy products include calcium, protein, potassium and vitamins. Want to learn more? Visit Maybury Farm in Northville where you can meet farm animals and learn about farming. And check out some amazing books about all things dairy and dairy substitutes! 

A wide-ranging history of a surprisingly controversial form of nourishment. Milk, from humans and a variety of animals, is the subject of the latest enthusiastic investigation by the prolific Kurlansky (Paper: Paging Through History, 2016, etc.), winner of the James Beard Award and Bon Appetit's Food Writer of the Year Award, among other accolades. For 10,000 years, milk has been "the most argued-over food in human history," the author asserts, with experts opining about whether milk was fit for human consumption, whether babies should be breast-fed (and by whom—their own mothers or wet nurses), which mammal produced the best milk, whether milk should be pasteurized and homogenized, how cows should be raised and milked, and what effects such interventions as hormones, antibiotics, and genetically modified crops have on the milk we consume. Although many cultures feature milk-based creation myths, breast-feeding has long been a source of contention. Excavations of ancient Roman gravesites have turned up baby milk bottles, indicating that some babies were artificially fed. In the Middle Ages, artificial feeding was common, with numerous recipes for baby formulas; in 1816, one writer advised that babies should be suckled on goats, setting off a trend throughout Europe. Also popular was the employment of wet nurses, who often became live-in domestics. The choice of wet nurse was not simple: Many believed that the baby would inherit the nurse's disposition and traits; one doctor recommended that "a brunette with her first child, which should be a boy" made the ideal wet nurse. Especially in cities, spoilage, unclean udders, and unsanitary dairies caused illness and a great number of infant deaths. Pasteurization was a solution, but consumers complained about the taste. Debate about the safety of raw milk, much prized by cheese makers and organic farmers, still rages. Kurlansky looks at the production of milk and its uses in liquid and solid form (yogurt, butter, cheese, ice cream, pudding) around the world throughout history and into the present.Chock-full of fascinating details and more than 100 recipes.

The average American eats 33 pounds of cheese a year, and physician and veganism advocate Barnard (Power Foods for the Brain) asserts that giving it up could be a route to improved overall health. Cheese, he warns, is an essentially unhealthy product-filled with fat, cholesterol, and sodium-and has addictive properties as well. Despite an overly alarmist tone, Barnard is effective in explaining how the "ultimate processed food" is manufactured, and, with plenty of statistics to hand, why it isn't healthful. To this end, he raises the array of medical problems potentially associated with dairy or obesity. Barnard's antidote is a standard plant-based food plan. Readers can eschew cheese and create healthier versions of favorite foods by following 70 recipes developed by vegan cookbook author Dreena Burton for meals, snacks, and desserts. The book also lists versatile cheese replacements employing nut butters, non-dairy plant milks, coconuts, and soy. 

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