Please join us on Saturday, June 25 at 4:00 PM in the Community Room for Count Me In. This is a sensory-friendly storytime filled with stories, songs and sign language especially designed for young children with developmental delays and disabilities. This program has been funded through the Dollar General Literacy Foundation grant.

Please join us on Saturday, May 21 at 4:00 PM in the Community Room for Count Me In. This is a sensory-friendly storytime filled with stories, songs and sign language especially designed for young children with developmental delays and disabilities. This program has been funded through the Dollar General Literacy Foundation grant.

Please join us on Saturday, April 23 at 4:00 PM in the Community Room for Count Me In. This is a sensory-friendly storytime filled with stories, songs and sign language especially designed for young children with developmental delays and disabilities. This program has been funded through the Dollar General Literacy Foundation grant.

Adult Contemporary Book Discussion

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Learn more and earn badges on the Connect Your Summer page.

Please join the Adult Contemporary Book Discussion Group to discuss:

The space between us : a novel by Thrity N. Umrigar
Also available in: e-book

A story of two compelling and achingly real women: Sera Dubash, an upper-middle-class Parsi housewife and Bhima, a stoic illiterate who has worked in the Dubash household for more than twenty years. Set in modern-day India. 

Upcoming sessions

Monday, August 15 -
7:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Community Room

Adult Contemporary Book Discussion

This post contains suggestions for how to earn your Explore History: On the Scene and Hit the Road: On the Scene badges.
Learn more and earn badges on the Connect Your Summer page.

Please join the Adult Contemporary Book Discussion Group to discuss:

Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook | large print

Marie Laure lives with her father in Paris and is blind by age six. Her father builds her a model of their neighborhood, so she can memorize it and navigate the real streets. When the Germans occupy Paris, they flee to Saint-Malo on the coast. In Germany, Werner grows up enchanted by a crude radio he finds. He becomes a master at building and fixing radios, which wins him a place with the Hitler Youth. Werner travels throughout Europe, and finally to Saint-Malo, where he meets Marie Laure.

Upcoming sessions

Monday, July 18 -
7:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Community Room

Adult Contemporary Book Discussion

This post contains suggestions for how to earn your Explore History: On the Scene and Hit the Road: On the Scene badges.
Learn more and earn badges on the Connect Your Summer page.

Please join the Adult Contemporary Book Discussion Group to discuss:

Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook | large print

Brought to Kenya from England as a child and then abandoned by her mother, Beryl is raised by both her father and the native Kipsigis tribe who share his estate. Her unconventional upbringing transforms Beryl into a bold young woman with a fierce love of all things wild and an inherent understanding of nature's delicate balance.

Upcoming sessions

Monday, June 20 -
7:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Friends' Activity Room

"Norman Doidge's revolutionary new book shows, for the first time, how the amazing process of neuroplastic healing really works. It describes natural, non-invasive avenues into the brain provided by the forms of energy around us--light, sound, vibration, movement--which pass through our senses and our bodies to awaken the brain's own healing capacities without producing unpleasant side effects. Doidge explores cases where patients alleviated years of chronic pain or recovered from debilitating strokes or accidents; children on the autistic spectrum or with learning disorders normalizing; symptoms of multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and cerebral palsy radically improved, and other near-miracle recoveries. And we learn how to vastly reduce the risk of dementia with simple approaches anyone can use. For centuries it was believed that the brain's complexity prevented recovery from damage or disease. The Brain's Way of Healing shows that this very sophistication is the source of a unique kind of healing"--.

"Nearly seventy-five years ago, Donald Triplett of Forest, Mississippi became the first child diagnosed with autism. Beginning with his family's odyssey, In a Different Key tells the extraordinary story of this often misunderstood condition, and of the civil rights battles waged by the families of those who have it. Unfolding over decades, it is a beautifully rendered history of ordinary people determined to secure a place in the world for those with autism--by liberating children from dank institutions, campaigning for their right to go to school, challenging expert opinion on what it means to have autism, and persuading society to accept those who are different. It is the story of women like Ruth Sullivan, who rebelled against a medical establishment that blamed cold and rejecting "refrigerator mothers" for causing autism; and of fathers who pushed scientists to dig harder for treatments. Many others played starring roles too: doctors like Leo Kanner, who pioneered our understanding of autism; lawyers like Tom Gilhool, who took the families' battle for education to the courtroom; scientists who sparred over how to treat autism; and those with autism, like Temple Grandin, Alex Plank, and Ari Ne'eman, who explained their inner worlds and championed the philosophy of neurodiversity. This is also a story of fierce controversies--from the question of whether there is truly an autism "epidemic," and whether vaccines played a part in it; to scandals involving "facilitated communication," one of many treatments that have proved to be blind alleys; to stark disagreements about whether scientists should pursue a cure for autism. There are dark turns too: we learn about experimenters feeding LSD to children with autism, or shocking them with electricity to change their behavior; and the authors reveal compelling evidence that Hans Asperger, discoverer of the syndrome named after him, participated in the Nazi program that consigned disabled children to death. By turns intimate and panoramic, In a Different Key takes us on a journey from an era when families were shamed and children were condemned to institutions to one in which a cadre of people with autism push not simply for inclusion, but for a new understanding of autism: as difference rather than disability"--.

"Throughout history, people have loved, owned and ridden horses. They fascinate us, and we are drawn to books like The Horse Whisperer, events like The Kentucky Derby, and movies like Steven Spielberg's War Horse. Owners and non-horse owners alike have also discovered the amazing abilities of horses to help us heal and recover from disabling physical and mental conditions such as autism and multiple sclerosis by participating in Equine Therapy. Men and women afflicted with severe emotional damage are healing and making dramatic recoveries by receiving the simple love, understanding and acceptance that comes from establishing a relationship with a horse. The unique message of Riding Home is two-fold. It is the first and only book to explain why horses have this remarkable ability to heal and positively transform emotionally wounded men and women, whether they be troubled teens, prison inmates, or war veterans with post traumatic stress disorder. On a societal level, it offers a powerful argument for the expansion of equine programs that accomplish what many organizations that utilize traditional methods of psychotherapy and pharmaceuticals have been unable to achieve. To have a relationship with a horse is to discover and know yourself and the world with truth and compassion. Horses help us discover hidden parts of ourselves. They teach us that when we're not getting what we want, we're the ones who need to change"--.

This year commemorates the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare's death and our Macbeth display pays tribute to the life and work of The Bard. Be sure to visit the Detroit Institute of Arts exhibit where the original book, The First Folio, will be on display from March 7 - April 3. And "Beware of the Ides of March!"

 

"There are so few established facts about how the son of a glove maker from Warwickshire became one of the greatest writers of all time that some people doubt he could really have written so many astonishing plays. We know that he married Anne Hathaway, who was pregnant and six years older than he, at the age of eighteen, and that one of their children died of the plague. We know that he left Stratford to seek his fortune in London, and eventually succeeded. He was clearly an unwilling craftsman, ambitious actor, resentful son, almost good-enough husband. But when and how did he also become a genius? The Secret Life of William Shakespeare pulls back the curtain to imagine what it might have really been like to be Shakespeare before a seemingly ordinary man became a legend. In the hands of acclaimed historical novelist Jude Morgan, this is a brilliantly convincing story of unforgettable richness, warmth, and immediacy"--.

When breath becomes air by Paul Kalanithi

"For readers of Atul Gawande, Andrew Solomon, and Anne Lamott, a profoundly moving, exquisitely observed memoir by a young neurosurgeon faced with a terminal cancer diagnosis who attempts to answer the question What makes a life worth living? At the age of thirty-six, on the verge of completing a decade's worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, and the next he was a patient struggling to live. And just like that, the future he and his wife had imagined evaporated. When Breath Becomes Air chronicles Kalanithi's transformation from a naïve medical student "possessed," as he wrote, "by the question of what, given that all organisms die, makes a virtuous and meaningful life" into a neurosurgeon at Stanford working in the brain, the most critical place for human identity, and finally into a patient and new father confronting his own mortality. What makes life worth living in the face of death? What do you do when the future, no longer a ladder toward your goals in life, flattens out into a perpetual present? What does it mean to have a child, to nurture a new life as another fades away? These are some of the questions Kalanithi wrestles with in this profoundly moving, exquisitely observed memoir. Paul Kalanithi died in March 2015, while working on this book, yet his words live on as a guide and a gift to us all. "I began to realize that coming face to face with my own mortality, in a sense, had changed nothing and everything," he wrote. "Seven words from Samuel Beckett began to repeat in my head: 'I can't go on. I'll go on.'" When Breath Becomes Air is an unforgettable, life-affirming reflection on the challenge of facing death and on the relationship between doctor and patient, from a brilliant writer who became both. Advance praise for When Breath Becomes Air "Rattling, heartbreaking, and ultimately beautiful, the too-young Dr. Kalanithi's memoir is proof that the dying are the ones who have the most to teach us about life."--Atul Gawande "Thanks to When Breath Becomes Air, those of us who never met Paul Kalanithi will both mourn his death and benefit from his life. This is one of a handful of books I consider to be a universal donor--I would recommend it to anyone, everyone."--Ann Patchett"--.

"Inspired by the New York Times op-ed "Always Hungry," ALWAYS HUNGRY? will change everything readers ever thought about weight loss, diet, and health. Groundbreaking new research shows that calorie counting does not work for weight loss: one diet causes weight gain whereas another diet with the same calorie count doesn't. It's your fat cells that are to blame for causing excessive hunger and increased weight. By eating the wrong foods, our fat cells are triggered to take in too many calories for themselves, setting off a dangerous chain reaction of increased appetite and a slower metabolism. Now, Harvard Medical School's David Ludwig, MD, PhD, offers an impeccably researched diet that will turn dieting on its head, teaching readers to reprogram their fat cells, tame hunger, boost metabolism, and lose weight--for good"--.