Catalog

Search our Catalog

SuzyQ's Blog

New Documentaries on the Shelf

Australia's first 4 billion years [videodisc] by Essential Media and Entertainment ; WGBH ; written, produced, and directed by Richard Smith

Bill Moyers [videodisc]: On the Hudson by Thirteen/WNET ; Public Affairs Television ; produced and directed by Monica Lange, Tom Spain, Kathleen Hughes, and Tom Casciato ; written by Tom Spain, Tom Casciato, Kathleen Hughes, and Bill Moyers

The ghost army [videodisc]

Great Barrier Reef [videodisc]

Last shop standing [videodisc]: rise, fall, & rebirth of the independent record shop by produced Rob Taylor ; directed by Pip Piper

Letters from Jackie [videodisc]: the private thoughts of Jackie Robinson by MLB Productions

Living downstream [videodisc] by a film by Chanda Chevannes

Mars landing 2012 [videodisc]: The new search for life by Cerebellum Documentaries

Doctors and Nurses in War

The new book Surgeon in Blue is the biography of Jonathan Letterman, the Civil War surgeon who, as chief medical officer for the Army of the Potomac, revolutionized combat medicine during four major battles of the war. Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg resulted in an unprecedented number of casualties, and his innovations saved countless lives. Among them was the first organized ambulance corps, and the establishment of hygiene and dietary standards. Learn about other brave doctors, nurses, and medics whose bravery and medical care saved lives while risking their own.

Revolutionary medicine, 1700-1800 by C. Keith Wilbur

Medics at war: military medicine from colonial times to the 21st century by John T. Greenwood, F. Clifton Berry Jr

Davy Crockett

Davy Crockett was born on August 17, 1786. While he is probably best known for having perished at the Battle of the Alamo in San Antonio, Texas in 1836, he also served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1827 to 1831, representing the 9th district of Tennessee.

Born on a mountaintop: on the road with Davy Crockett and the ghosts of the wild frontier by Bob Thompson

David Crockett: the Lion of the West by Michael Wallis

Davy Crockett [videodisc] by A & E Television Network

The Alamo: an illustrated history by Edwin P. Hoyt

The blood of heroes: the 13-day struggle for the Alamo— and the sacrifice that forged a nation by James Donovan

Low Winter Sun

Detroit will be the setting for the new drama Low Winter Sun which will begin airing on AMC on Sunday, August 11 at 10 p.m. The new drama is based on a 2006 British miniseries of the same name and stars Mark Strong and Lennie James. The story begins with the murder of a cop by a fellow Detroit detective that will eventually pull him into the heart of the local underworld. Not only will the drama be set in the Motor City, but it will also be filmed there with much of the casting coming from the Detroit area. The pilot episode was shot last September, 2012 and nine more will be filmed for the first season. AMC is also home to such groundbreaking programming as Mad Men, Breaking Bad and The Walking Dead. View the trailer here.

Go West!

In 1890 the U.S. Census Bureau declared the American frontier to be "closed" - ending one hundred years of expansion. In July, 1893, Frederick Jackson Turner delivered his essay The Significance of the Frontier in American History at the World's Columbia Exposition in Chicago, explaining his views on how the idea of a frontier helped to shaped America's characteristics. Beginning with the mountain men and Lewis & Clark, and ending with the closing of the frontier, the Library has a great collection of resources available about our country's westward movement. Start with some of the titles below:

Across the Great Divide: Robert Stuart and the discovery of the Oregon Trail by Laton McCartney

After Lewis and Clark: mountain men and the paths to the Pacific by Robert M. Utley ; maps by Peter H. Dana

The American West by Dee Brown ; photos edited by Martin F.Schmitt

Medicare Signed Into Law

On July 30, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed Medicare into law. The event took place at the Truman Library in Independence, Missouri, where former president Harry Truman was enrolled as the health insurance program's first beneficiary. The program, which provides hospital and medical insurance for Americans 65 years or older, was signed into law as an amendment to the Social Security Act of 1935. For complete information on your Medicare benefits go the official website.

Social Security Handbook: overview of Social Security programs, 2013

Student's guide to landmark congressional laws on social security and welfare by Steven G. Livingston

The people's pension: the struggle to defend Social Security since Reagan by Eric Laursen

Alexis de Tocqueville

Born in Verneuil, France on July 29, 1805, Alexis de Tocqueville was the author of the classic text Democracy in America. Originally published in two volumes in 1835 and 1840, it was based on the author's 1831 visit to the United States, and described the social and economic changes taking place in the young nation. It is considered by some historians to be one of the most insightful books written about democracy.

Democracy in America by translated by Arthur Goldhammer

Democracy in America by translated by Arthur Goldhammer

Tocqueville's discovery of America by Leo Damrosch

Alexis de Tocqueville: a life by Hugh Brogan

Detroit History

This Special Collection was created as Detroit prepared to celebrate its 300th birthday, a year-long event that was marked by a host of festivities and events. The history of the city is broad enough and rich enough, though, to warrant a continual presence and periodic updating as one of the library's special online resource collections. As we celebrate the city's 313th birthday, check the books, websites and other materials listed here to discover more about the Motor City and its colorful past.

History of Detroit

Celebrating 300 Years of Detroit Cooking, 1701 to 2001 edited by Marguerite J. Humes: A "historical cookbook" presenting information about Detroit's social setting and cooking history from 1701 to 2001. Includes original recipes handed down by Native Americans and immigrants alike, as well as some developed by native Detroiters.

Detroit, 1860-1899 by David Lee Poremba: Venture back in time to Detroit in the mid to late 19th century with this fascinating book.

Detroit: A Motor City History by David Lee Poremba: A concise and highly readable history by the acting manager of the Burton Historical Collection at the Detroit Public Library.

Detroit: Across Three Centuries by Richard Bak: Bak introduces readers to some of the epic names and events from the city's past.

Great Discoveries in Physics

It was 100 years ago this year, in 1913, that physicist Niels Bohr discovered the quantum atom (i.e the atomic nucleus in the center with the electrons in orbit around it). For this work he received the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1922. In honor of this goundbreaking event read about some of the other amazing discoveries by physicists throughout history:

American Prometheus: the triumph and tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer by Kai Bird and Martin J. Sherwin

The Curies: a biography of the most controversial family in science by Denis Brian

Degrees Kelvin: a tale of genius, invention, and tragedy by David Lindley

Edward Teller: the real Dr. Strangelove by Peter Goodchild

New Documentaries on the Shelf

Bert Stern [videodisc]: original mad man by Magic Film Productions ; Motor Entertainment ; produced and directed by Shannah Laumeister ; producer, Gregory McClatchy, Phyllis Stuart

Brooklyn castle [videodisc] by Producers Distribution Agency presents ; a Rescued Media production ; in association with Indelible Marks and Chicken and Egg Pictures ; produced by Nelson Dellamaggiore, Brian Schulz ; directed by Katie Dellamaggiore

Cesar Millan [videodisc]: the real story

Journey of the universe [videodisc]: an epic story of cosmic, Earth, and human transformation by produced and directed by Patsy Northcutt, David Kennard ; written by Brian Thomas Swimme, Mary Evelyn Tucker ; Northcutt Productions ; InCA Productions

Kind hearted woman [videodisc] by PBS ; a film by David Sutherland

Last summer won't happen [videodisc] by a film by Peter Gessner and Thomas Hurwitz

Happy Birthday to our Nation's Capital!

fireworksOn July 16, 1790, President George Washington signed the Residence Act, officially approving the creation of a capital district to be located along the Potomac River on the country's East Coast. According to the U.S. Constitution, Washington, D.C. is not part of any state, but is under the exclusive jurisdiction of the United States Congress. Virginia and Maryland both donated land to form the capital district which was named in honor of our first president.

Through a fiery trial: building Washington, 1790-1800 by Bob Arnebeck

Washington: the making of the American capital by Fergus M. Bordewich

Washington burning: how a Frenchman's vision of our nation's capital survived Congress, the Founding Fathers, and the invading British Army by Les Standiford