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New Documentaries on the Shelf

Boredom [videodisc]


Racing dreams [videodisc]: coming of age in a fast world by produced by Bristol Baughan, Marshall Curry ; written and directed by Marshall Curry


21 great wonders of the world [videodisc]


GMO OMG [videodisc] by a Compeller Pictures production ; in association with Heartworn Pictures ; presented by Nature's Path ; produced by Joshua A. Kunau ; written and directed by Jeremy Seifert


Freedom summer [videodisc] by Corporation for Public Broadcasting

California Statehood

California was admitted to the United States on September 9, 1850. Originally colonized by the Spanish in the 17th century, it became part of Mexico in 1821. In 1846, a group of American settlers declared an independent California Repulic shortly after the beginning of the Mexican-American War. The California Gold Rush of 1848 led to a huge increase in Califronia's population and started an economic boom. Some of the many figures connected to the state's rich and complicated history include Sir Francis Drake, Junipero Serra, John Fremont, Leland Stanford, Upton Sinclair, and William Randolph Hearst. Learn more:

Labor Day

This legal holiday is celebrated in the United States on the first Monday of every September. The first Labor Day celebration dates back to a parade in New York on Tuesday, September 5, 1882. More than half the states were celebrating Labor Day by 1893, but it wasn't made a national holiday until June 28, 1894, when President Grover Cleveland signed it into law.

Books

Reference

Historical encyclopedia of American labor by edited by Robert Weir and James P. Hanlan

Labor conflict in the United States: an encyclopedia by edited by Ronald L. Filippelli — editorial assistant, Carol Reilly

US Labor History

Bread--and roses: the struggle of American labor, 1865- 1915 by Milton Meltzer — illustrated with contemporary prints & photographs — Using diaries, newspaper reports and other source material, the author shows the industrialization of America and the workers' struggle for higher working standards.

Child labor: an American history by Hugh D. Hindman — This book considers the issue of child labor as a social and economic problem in America from an historical perspective — as it was found in major American industries and occupations, including coal mines, cotton textile mills and sweatshops, in the early 1900s.

The British Burn Washington

Two hundred years ago this year, during the War of 1812,  the British army occupied Washington, setting fire to many public buildings, including  the White House and the Capitol. It was on  August 24, 1814, that approximately 4.000 troops entered the city, causing most of the residents to flee. A warning was dispatched to First Lady Dolley Madison who managed to escape across the Potomac River with a portrait of George Washington in tow. This was the only time since the American Revolution that a foreign power has captured the United States capital.

The burning of Washington: the British invasion of 1814 by Anthony S. Pitch


Washington burning: how a Frenchman's vision of our nation's capital survived Congress, the Founding Fathers, and the invading British Army by Les Standiford

World War I: the Americans

Although the United States did not enter the war until 1917, the American Expeditionary Force suffered 320,500 casualties. In memory of the 100th anniversary of the war read about some of these brave men and women:

Yanks: the epic story of the American Army in World War I by John S.D. Eisenhower with Joanne Thompson Eisenhower


Five lieutenants: the heartbreaking story of five Harvard men who led America to victory in World War I by James Carl Nelson


The long way home: an American journey from Ellis Island to the Great War by David Laskin


American women in World War I: they also served by Lettie Gavin


Crusader nation: the United States in peace and the Great War by David Traxel

Three Days of Peace and Music

"By the time we got to Woodstock, we were half a million strong." Those words, written by Joni Mitchell in her famous song about the event, perfectly captured the feelings about the music festival for those who were there. It was forty five years ago on August 15, 1969, that thousands of people gathered in rural Bethel, New York to attend what would become an historic outdoor concert. For those who attended - and even like Mitchell - those who could not, Woodstock became a defining moment. Richie Havens, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Santana, Neil Young, Jefferson Airplane, the Who and Crosby, Stills & Nash were just some of the musicians who performed that weekend.

Lauren Bacall

Legendary Hollywood actress Lauren Bacall has passed away at the age of 89. She made her first film - To Have and  Have Not -  in 1944 with future husband Humphrey Bogart. They went on to star together in several more films including The Big Sleep and Key Largo. Her many film roles ranged from the comedic to the dramatic, as well as musical. She also enjoyed  great success on Broadway, where she won two Tony Awards - for Applause in 1970 and Woman of the Year in 1981.


Dark passage [videodisc] by First National Pictures, Inc., Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.


Harper [videodisc] by Warner Bros. Pictures presents a Gershwin-Kastner production

World War I: the Campaigns

The battles of World War I were fought in Europe, the  Middle East, and the Pacific. In memory of the war's 100th anniversary, check out some of the library's many resources on this global event whose repercussions are still being felt today:

To conquer hell: the Meuse-Argonne, 1918 by Edward G. Lengel


Verdun: the longest battle of the Great War by Paul Jankowski


Castles of steel: Britain, Germany, and the winning of the Great War at sea by Robert K. Massie


Yanks: the epic story of the American Army in World War I by John S.D. Eisenhower with Joanne Thompson Eisenhower


Setting the desert on fire: T.E. Lawrence and Britain's secret war in Arabia, 1916/1918 by James Barr