Crazy Weather

According to the NOAA National Climatic Data Center's State of the Climate: National Overview June 2012 Report the last 12 months have been the warmest on record for the mainland United States. Although alarming, this does not come as a surprise to most people with the extremely high temperatures experienced over the last several weeks. But what is going on? To help you understand this crazy weather, you may want to check out CPL resources on climate change and in particular:

Waking the giant: how a changing climate triggers earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanoes by Bill McGuire

Earth Day Programs at CPL

We're celebrating Earth Day all week (April 22-27) and want you to join us! See the write up in the Canton Observer. There will be events for adults, teens, tweens and children, including:

American Way of Eating Author Appearance

The public is invited on Wednesday, April 4 at Noon to a talk and book signing by Tracie McMillan, local NY Times Bestselling author. The event takes place on the University of Michigan Dearborn Campus (1030 CASL Building). For more information please call 313-583-6400.

The American way of eating: undercover at Walmart, Applebee's, farm fields and the dinner table by Tracie McMillan — addresses issues of food production, poverty and low wage work in the style of Barbara Ehrenreich's Nickel and Dimed. It also critically discusses Detroit's "food desert status and talks about the role of urban agriculture in sustaining Detroit's food system."

Doomsday Seed Vault

According to msnbc.com, the Doomsday Seed Vault located in Norway is scheduled to receive nearly 25,000 samples of seeds this week from around the world. The vault acts as a backup for living crop collections around the world to ensure crop diversity and future food supplies. The vault opened on February 2008 and is dug into the Platåberget mountain ("Plateau mountain") located near the village of Longyearbyen, Svalbard, a group of islands north of mainland Norway. Look to CPL for more resources on seeds or search our Science in Context database for information on the Doomsday Seed Vault or Svalbard Global Seed Vault. [Photo courtesy of AP Images]

Wolves Off Endangered Species List

According to an article from the Michigan Water Stewardship Program, as of Friday, June 27, wolves have officially been removed from the Federal Endangered Species List in the western Great Lakes region including Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota. The management authority over wolves in Michigan has been returned to the Department of Natural Resources. Wolves will "remain a protected, non-game species in Michigan, but state management will afford more options when dealing with wolves preying on livestock or dogs." Look to CPL for more resources on wolves or search one of our databases for information on the Endangered Species Act: Science in Context or Opposing Viewpoints in Context.
[Photo courtesy of AP Images]

Consumer Trend for 2012: Eco-cycology

According to trendwatching.com in 12 Consumer Trends for 2012, one trend to watch out for in 2012 is what they have dubbed "eco-cycology" or "the phenomenon of brands helping consumers recycle by taking back all old items from customers, and then doing something constructive with them." While this is sometimes prompted by legislation and sometimes by companies themselves, ultimately it is prompted by you the consumer. Check out CPL resources to learn more about how businesses are greening their practices.

2011 Lunch and a Book Picks

Every year CPL's Lunch and a Book Club picks our favorite reads of the year. These are our favorite reads for 2011. The picks are as eclectic as our group! Feel free to join us. We meet on the second Thursday of every month at noon in CPL's Community Room.

Fiction

Catching fire by Suzanne Collins

The forgotten garden: a novel by Kate Morton

The girl who played with fire by Stieg Larsson

In the bleak midwinter by Julia Spencer-Fleming

Mark of the lion by Suzanne M. Arruda

Jesmyn Ward Winner of National Book Award

Salvage the bones: a novel by Jesmyn Ward was announced on Wednesday as the winner of the National Book Award for fiction. The novel — about a poor, rural African American family living in Mississippi and facing obstacles no less then Hurricane Katrina — was considered "a long shot, at best" to win the prestigious award according to a CNN article. Ward, herself a Katrina survivior, was surprised and delighted. Now on the radar, critics are quickly praising it as a "classical tragedy."

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