Interested in reading a story that takes place in a different time period? Try checking out one of these historic tales. Books are suggested for Sixth Grade, but remember that each Reader is different, and might find something interesting at another level.

Call it courage by Armstrong Sperry

Mafatu, a young Polynesian boy whose name means Stout Heart, overcomes his terrible fear of the sea and proves his courage to himself and his people.

Chains by Laurie Halse Anderson

After being sold to a cruel couple in New York City, a slave named Isabel spies for the rebels during the Revolutionary War.

 

Interested in reading a story that takes place in a different time period? Try checking out one of these historic tales. Books are suggested for Fifth Grade, but remember that each Reader is different, and might find something interesting at another level.

The boy who dared by Susan Campbell Bartoletti

In October, 1942, seventeen-year-old Helmuth Hübener, imprisoned for distributing anti-Nazi leaflets, recalls his past life and how he came to dedicate himself to bring the truth about Hitler and the war to the German people.

Bud, not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis

Ten-year-old Bud, a motherless boy living in Flint, Michigan, during the Great Depression, escapes a bad foster home and sets out in search of the man he believes to be his father--the renowned bandleader, H.E. Calloway of Grand Rapids.

 

Interested in reading a story that takes place in a different time period? Try checking out one of these historic tales. Books are suggested for Fourth Grade, but remember that each Reader is different, and might find something interesting at another level.

Anna's blizzard by Alison Hart

Having never excelled at schoolwork, twelve-year-old Anna discovers that she may know a few things about survival when the 1888 Children's Blizzard traps her and her classmates in their Nebraska schoolhouse.

Caddie Woodlawn by Carol Ryrie Brink

Follow the adventures of an eleven-year-old tomboy growing up on the Wisconsin frontier in the mid-nineteenth century.

 

Interested in reading a story that takes place in a different time period? Try checking out one of these historic tales. Books are suggested for Third Grade, but remember that each Reader is different, and might find something interesting at another level.

Abe Lincoln at last! by Mary Pope Osborne

The magic tree house whisks Jack and Annie to Washington D.C. in the 1860s where they meet Abraham Lincoln and collect a feather that will help break a magic spell.

All-of-a-kind family by Sydney Taylor

Follow the adventures of five sisters growing up in a Jewish family in New York in the early twentieth century.

 

Interested in reading a story that takes place in a different time period? Try checking out one of these historic tales. Books are suggested for Second Grade, but remember that each Reader is different, and might find something interesting at another level.

During the Revolutionary War, a fourteen-year-old spy carried messages to George Washington's camp in the buttons of his coat.  This story reconstructs a possible mission.

Chang's Paper Pony by Eleanor Coerr

In San Francisco during the 1850s gold rush, Chang, the son of Chinese immigrants, wants a pony but cannot afford one until his friend Big Pete finds a solution. (I Can Read).

 

Interested in reading a story that takes place in a different time period? Try checking out one of these historic tales. Books are suggested for First Grade, but remember that each Reader is different, and might find something interesting at another level.

Back of the bus by Aaron Reynolds

From the back of the bus, an African American child watches the arrest of Rosa Parks.

Boxes for Katje by Candace Fleming

After a young Dutch girl writes to her new American friend in thanks for the care package sent after World War II, she begins to receive increasingly larger boxes.

Interested in reading a story that takes place in a different time period? Try checking out one of these historic tales. Books are suggested for Kindergarten, but remember that each reader is different, and might find something interesting at another level.

Busing Brewster by Richard Michelson

Bused across town to a school in a white neighborhood of Boston in 1974, a young African American boy named Brewster describes his first day in first grade. This book also includes historical notes on court-ordered busing.

Dancing with Katya by Dori Chaconas

In the late 1920s, Anna tries to help her younger sister Katya regain her strength and joy in life after she becomes crippled by polio.

Earn your Hit the Road badge while you travel the world with these real-life stories by women travelers. 

Alone in Antarctica by Felicity Aston

"In the whirling noise of our advancing technological age, we are seemingly never alone, never out-of-touch with the barrage of electronic data and information. Felicity Aston, physicist and meteorologist, took two months off from all human contact as she became the first woman -- and only the third person in history - to ski across the entire continent of Antarctica alone. She did it, too, with the simple apparatus of cross-country, without the aids used by her prededecessors - two Norwegian men - each of whom employed either parasails or kites. Aston's journey across the ice at the bottom of the world asked of her the extremes in terms of mental and physical bravery, as she faced the risks of unseen cracks buried in the snow so large they might engulf her and hypothermia due to brutalizing weather. She had to deal, too, with her emotional vulnerability in face of the constant bombardment of hallucinations brought on by the vast sea of whiteness, the lack of stimulation to her senses as she faced what is tantamount to a form of solitary confinement. Like Cheryl Strayed's Wild, Felicity Aston's Alone in Antarctica becomes an inspirational saga of one woman's battle through fear and loneliness as she honestly confronts both the physical challenges of her adventure, as well as her own human vulnerabilities. "--.

In Around the Bloc, Griest relates her experiences as a volunteer at a children’s shelter in Moscow, a propaganda polisher at the office of the Chinese Communist Party’s English-language mouthpiece in Beijing, and a belly dancer among the rumba queens of Havana. She falls in love with an ex-soldier who narrowly avoided radiation cleanup duties at Chernobyl, hangs out with Cuban hip-hop artists, and comes to difficult realizations about the meaning of democracy. 

Black dove, white raven by Elizabeth Wein

Having moved to Ethiopia to avoid the prejudices of 1930s America, Emilia Menotti, her black adoptive brother Teo, and their mother Rhoda, a stunt pilot, are devoted to their new country even after war with Italy looms, drawing the teens into the conflict.

The diviners by Libba Bray

Seventeen-year-old Evie O'Neill is thrilled when she is exiled from small-town Ohio to New York City in 1926, even when a rash of occult-based murders thrusts Evie and her uncle, curator of The Museum of American Folklore, Superstition, and the Occult, into the thick of the investigation.

Explore a different culture with these fascinating teen books. 

Two teens from different ethnic groups in present-day Afghanistan must fight their culture, tradition, families, and the Taliban to stay together as they and another village boy relate the story of their forbidden love.

If you could be mine by Sara Farizan

In Iran, where homosexuality is punishable by death, seventeen-year-olds Sahar and Nasrin love each other in secret until Nasrin's parents announce their daughter's arranged marriage and Sahar proposes a drastic solution.

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