Free Comic Book Day!

The first Saturday of May each year is Free Comic Book Day. This year it will be Saturday, May 7th and you will have a chance to get free comic books. A limited number will be available at the library, but more can be had by visiting our local comic store, Comic City, located at 42727 Ford Road, Canton, MI. Comic lovers of all ages across North America and around the world will be enjoying this special event. Join them!

Trouble with Chickens

Are you in the mood for a pun-a-page mystery featuring adorable chickens, a feather-brained hen (their mom), and a daring, deadpan-humored dog? Then get on the wait list for The Trouble with Chickens — a J.J. Tully Mystery by Doreen Cronin. Tully is a former search-and-rescue dog that is trying to enjoy his retirement years, when two puffy chicks (Dirt and Sugar) and their mom (Moosh) appear peeping for his help. Poppy and Sweetie are missing! Tully won't work for chicken feed, but he will take the case for a cheeseburger. Snooping for clues along twisting trails, under sagging couches, and down slippery hallways, Tully wonders if he is on a wild chick chase. Suddenly he catches the scent of Vince the Funnel and realizes that it won't be easy to crack the shell of this chicken case. This easy fiction mystery will be enjoyed by readers of all ages with its endearing animal characters, punny pages, humor, and action. Let's hope for more J.J. Tully mysteries!

Plain Kate

One of my esteemed colleagues, whose opinion I value very highly, once gave a presentation illustrating that you can tell a book by its cover. So, when I picked up Plain Kate by Erin Bow to read, I looked at its cover and thought I was in for a fanciful tale about an orphan girl and her cat, probably set in 18th century London; a simple, sweet story about a chimney sweep lass — along the lines of Mary Poppins and Bert. Forget it! Witchcraft, mysteriously sinister magic, gyspies, bigotry, superstition, loss of loved ones, hunger, plagues, death… those are but some of the dark elements behind this light dreamy-looking cover. However, one also encounters friendship, courage, love, forgiveness, development of a gifted, lonely soul, and a human-animal bond that surpasses all evil in the world. In short, Plain Kate is a great read, with twists and turns that you simply never expect. Check it out and let others know what YOU think! (There is a very poignant dedication at end, page 314, that you won't want to miss.)

Children's Book Week (May 2-8)

Children's Book Week has been celebrated since 1919 as a way to promote a love of reading in children. There are book parties, storytelling festivals, special author and illustrator appearances… whatever communities feel will inspire young readers to read more. The idea for Children's Book Week really began in 1913 when Franklin K. Matthiews, librarian for the Boy Scouts of America, began touring the United States to promote higher standards in children's books. He enlisted the help of others in the publishing and library fields and a great event was born. As one supporter, Frederic Melcher, said, "A great nation is a reading nation." Although Children's Book Week has changed as to when it is celebrated time and how, this statement has remained true. In 2008 the Children's Book Council created the Children's Choice Book Awards — the only national child-chosen book awards program. It lets children have a voice in their reading choices. This is your chance, kids of Canton, to vote for your favorite book! Go to this website and cast your vote!

Saving Zasha

Are you in the mood for a simple, sweet dog story? Then Saving Zasha by Randi Barrow is just for you. It takes place in the Soviet Union right after World War II and is based on the real situation of canines in Russia at this time. Two brothers are determined to save a beautiful German Shepherd from certain death, since anything 'German' should be destroyed. Service in the military, starvation, abandonment, illness, and injury had all but eliminated the entire dog population in the Soviet Union. Finally realizing the value of dogs the Soviet government decided to create a new breed of dog — a "superdog" — to be used for work and military purposes. What few dogs remained were being kidnapped and sold for large sums of money. Will Mikhail and Nikolai be able to hide Zasha, especially once they learn from their mother that Zasha is pregnant? Will their nosy neighbor, Katia, who suspects they have the dog, ruin everything? Will their father, who is still officially missing in action, ever return? Told from the perspective of a young teen, this tender dog adventure tale is sure to please.

The Magic of Music!

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Gather with others to learn more about musical instruments and the joys of making music.
When: March 21, 7:00-8:00PM
Where: Community Room
Who: Families with children ages 4-9
Registration begins March 7
Sponsored by the Target Store Early Childhood Reading Grant and the Friends of the Canton Public Library

Mysteries of the Magnificent Variety

Are you looking for a great mystery with some meat to it? Lewis Buzbee has written such awesome books. In Steinbeck's Ghost, 13-year-old Travis, unhappy about his family's recent move, finds he can still connect with his old life at the Salinas Library re-reading his favorite books. He enjoys Steinbeck — after all, Salinas is Steinbeck's hometown. But suddenly he begins seeing the characters spring to life. As he struggles to solve this mystery, budget cuts threaten his library. In looking for ways to save his haven, Travis uncovers many truths and stumbles into a story Steinbeck might be telling him to write.

Moon Over Manifest

This year's Newbery Award winning book, Moon Over Manifest by Clare Vanderpool, presents a story within a story and is totally captivating. Historical fiction should always be this compelling. But you can read the rave reviews and plot summaries by clicking on the link to this item in our catalog. What I want to relate is why this superb novel touched me personally. One story take place in 1936, during The Great Depression. I grew up hearing stories and accounts of what it was like to live during this trying time from my parents and grandparents. My mother told about searching for stray pennies in couch cushions to buy a loaf a bread. She had to sleep on the floor so boarders could have the beds in the bedrooms. The city of Detroit had to pay its police officers (as in my grandfather) in scrip because it had no cash. Many retailers wouldn't accept scrip. Memories were endless.