Book Gems: Nonfiction

On September 29, the librarians of CPL presented the hidden 'gems' in the stacks; books you might never have heard of but that you won't want to miss. In the video below, Lisa tells us about several good nonfiction titles:

Did you miss the program the first time around? Did we miss some hidden gems? Tell us if you'd like us to do this program again in the comments. Also, enjoy the full list of nonfiction books below:

Devil in the details: scenes from an obsessive girlhood by Jennifer Traig — As a teenager in California during the eighties, Traig's obsessive compulsive disorder made her disinfect everything around her. She looks back with an unflinching eye — sharing even the most painful details — but she does it with humor and compassion. If you like memoirs/essays of David Sedaris or Augusten Burroughs, or Rhoda Janzen’s Mennonite in a little black dress this is for you.

New Bengali Books

Looking for books in Bengali? We have them. New Bengali books received in 2011 include:

Ādhunika ramaṇīdera ādhunika rānnā by Sādiẏā Rahamāna Munnī

Bandha darajā kholā darajā by Sunīla Gaṅgopādhyāẏa

Karporeṭa bhālobāsā by Śahīdula Haka Khāna

Saṃsiddha: galpagrantha = Sangshiddha = Accomplished by Runu Haka, Śabanama Āmīra, Sāherā Āphajā, Phārajānā Āhmeda, Pheradausa Jesamīna

Book Gems: Fiction

If you missed our Book Gems program last night, you can still take a peek at the titles we highlighted:

Not all tarts are apple by Pip Granger — This charming book set in 1953 London focuses on Rosie, the 7-year-old narrator, and the colorful characters in her Soho neighborhood. Try this if you like cozy British mysteries — especially if you care more about the setting and characters than the mystery itself.

Then she found me by Elinor Lipman — Restrained high school Latin teacher April Epner is dismayed when her extroverted birth mother finds her in this wry, unsentimental comedy of manners. A good choice for readers of Anne Tyler or Elizabeth Berg.

Jayber Crow: a novel by Wendell Berry — After a lonely childhood in an orphanage, Jayber Crow comes to Port William, KY in the 1930’s. A contemplative man, he remains an observer of those around him. This unhurried, lyrical portrayal of a small community rewards the reader with a clear nuanced examination of humanity and faith.

New Gujarati Books

Take a look at the new Gujarati books we've received in 2011. Brand-new titles include:

Motano sāmāna: rahasyakathā by Vrajalāla Hirajī Joshī

Nishadhapati: [aitihāsika navalakathā] by Mohanalāla Cunīlāla Dhāmī

Praśāmmu by Jayanta Gāḍīta

Saunā hr̥dayamāṃ harahammeśa Maheśa-Nareśa: jīvanasambhāraṇānnī śabdayātrā by ālekhaka, Jī. ema. Hirāgara

Śrīmatīnī ḍāyarī by Dāmu Sāṅgāṇī

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