Nonfiction Book Group August 2017

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A true story of tenacity and imagination describes how an African teenager built a windmill from scraps to create electricity for his home and his village, improving life for himself and his neighbors.

Upcoming sessions

Saturday, August 19 - 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM Community Room

Lunch and a Book August 2017

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Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook

 The incandescent story of a 104-year-old woman and the sweet, strange young boy assigned to help her around the house -- a friendship that touches each member of the boy's unmoored family For years, guitarist Quinn Porter has been on the road, chasing gig after gig, largely absent to his twice-ex-wife Belle and their odd, Guinness records-obsessed son. When the boy dies suddenly, Quinn seeks forgiveness for his paternal shortcomings by completing the requirements for his son's unfinished Boy Scout badge. For seven Saturdays, Quinn does yard work for Ona Vitkus, the wily 104-year-old Lithuanian immigrant the boy had visited weekly.

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Looking for Switch games? Your library has them!

 Check out our first batch of games for the latest Nintendo format, including the incredible The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild.

Dance solo or with friends to 40 music tracks.

Throw an impromptu party anywhere with anyone thanks to the new Nintendo Switch play style in which players look at each other-- not the screen! Bring the action and fun into the real world as you face off in wild-west duels, cow-milking competitions, a copycat dance-off. While the action unfolds, off-screen, the audience watches the players themselves instead of the screen. That makes it as hilarious to watch as it is to play-- an instant party amplifier.

Nonfiction Book Group July 2017

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Also available in: e-book

Why are the Danes so happy, despite having the highest taxes? Do the Finns really have the best education system? Are the Icelanders as feral as they sometimes appear? How are the Norwegians spending their fantastic oil wealth? And why do all of them hate the Swedes? Michael Booth explains who the Scandinavians are, how they differ and why, and he explores why these societies have become so successful and models for the world. Along the way a more nuanced, often darker picture emerges of a region plagued by taboos, characterized by suffocating parochialism, and populated by extremists of various shades. They may very well be almost nearly perfect, but it isn't easy being Scandinavian.

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There are no upcoming sessions available.

Lunch and a Book July 2017

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Wolf's mouth by John Smolens

In 1944 Italian officer Captain Francesco Verdi is captured by Allied forces in North Africa and shipped to a POW camp in Michigan's Upper Peninsula, where the senior POW, the ruthless Kommandant Vogel, demands that all prisoners adhere to his Nazi dictates. His life threatened, Verdi escapes from the camp and meets up with an American woman, Chiara Frangiapani, who helps him elude capture as they flee to the Lower Peninsula. By 1956 they have become Frank and Claire Green, a young married couple building a new life in postwar Detroit. When INS agent James Giannopoulos tracks them down, Frank learns that Vogel is executing men like Frank for their wartime transgressions. As a series of brutal murders rivets Detroit, Frank is caught between American justice and Nazi vengeance.

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There are no upcoming sessions available.

Nonfiction Book Group June 2017

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Amid the fervor of the religious revival known as the Second Great Awakening, John Humphrey Noyes, a spirited but socially awkward young man, attracted a group of devoted followers with his fiery sermons about creating Jesus' millennial kingdom here on Earth. Noyes established a revolutionary community in rural New York centered around achieving a life free of sin through God's grace, while also espousing equality of the sexes and "complex marriage," a system of free love where sexual relations with multiple partners was encouraged. When the Community disbanded in 1880, the Oneida Community, Limited, would go on to become one of the nation's leading manufacturers of silverware, and their brand a coveted mark of middle-class respectability in pre- and post-WWII America.

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Lunch and a Book June 2017

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A man called Ove : a novel by Fredrik Backman
Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook

Meet Ove. He’s a curmudgeon—the kind of man who points at people he dislikes as if they were burglars caught outside his bedroom window. He has staunch principles, strict routines, and a short fuse. People call him “the bitter neighbor from hell.” But must Ove be bitter just because he doesn’t walk around with a smile plastered to his face all the time? Behind the cranky exterior there is a story and a sadness. So when one November morning a chatty young couple with two chatty young daughters move in next door and accidentally flatten Ove’s mailbox, it is the lead-in to a comical and heartwarming tale of unkempt cats, unexpected friendship, and the ancient art of backing up a U-Haul.

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There are no upcoming sessions available.

Curious about why Denmark has topped lists as the world's happiest country? Explore the vibrant culture of this northern land and find out.

How is it that these 5.6 million Danes are so content when they live in a country that is dark and cold nine months of the year and where income taxes are at almost 60 percent? At a time when talk across the Western world is focused on unemployment woes, government overreach, and anti-taxation lobbies, our Danish counterparts seem to breathe a healthier and fresher air. Interweaving anecdotes and research, Malene Rydahl explores how the values of trust, education, and a healthy work-life balance with  purpose—to name just a few—contribute to a “happy” population.

When she was given the opportunity of a new life in rural Jutland, journalist and archetypal Londoner Helen Russell discovered a startling statistic: the happiest place on earth is Denmark, a land often thought of by foreigners as consisting entirely of long dark winters, cured herring, Lego and pastries. What is the secret to their success? Are happy Danes born, or made? Helen gives herself a year to uncover the formula for Danish happiness. The Year of Living Danishly is a funny, poignant record of a journey that shows us where the Danes get it right, where they get it wrong, and how we might just benefit from living a little more Danishly ourselves.

The centuries-old Danish tradition of Hygge (pronounced "hue-gah") is a special custom of emotional warmth, slowness, and appreciation, and it is becoming increasingly familiar to an international audience. To hygge means to enjoy the good things in life with good people.

Lunch and a Book May 2017

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Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook

In what is perhaps her richest and most deeply searching novel, Anne Tyler gives us a story about what it is to be an American, and about Maryam Yazdan, who after Thirty-five years in this country must finally come to terms with her “outsiderness.” Two families, who would otherwise never have come together, meet by chance at the Baltimore airport—the Donaldsons, a very American couple, and the Yazdans, Maryam’s fully assimilated son and his attractive Iranian American wife. Each couple is awaiting the arrival of an adopted infant daughter from Korea. After the babies from distant Asia are delivered, Bitsy Donaldson impulsively invites the Yazdans to celebrate with an “arrival party,” an event that is repeated every year as the two families become more deeply intertwined.

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There are no upcoming sessions available.

Nonfiction Book Group May 2017

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Also available in: e-book | audiobook | large print

Oxford English Dictionary began in 1857, took seventy years to complete, drew from tens of thousands of brilliant minds, and organized the sprawling language into 414,825 precise definitions. Hidden within the rituals of its creation is the story of two remarkable men.

Professor James Murray was the distinguished editor of the OED project. Dr. William Chester Minor was one of thousands of contributors. Minor was remarkably prolific, sending thousands of neat, handwritten quotations from his home in the small village of Crowthorne, fifty miles from Oxford. On numerous occasions, Murray invited Minor to visit Oxford, but Murray's offer was regularly--and mysteriously--refused.

Finally, in 1896, after Minor had sent nearly ten thousand definitions to the dictionary, a puzzled Murray set out to visit him. It was then that Murray finally learned that Minor was a murderer locked up in Broadmoor, England's harshest asylum for criminal lunatics.

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