Nonfiction Book Group June 2017

Please join the Nonfiction Book Group to discuss:

Amid the fervor of the religious revival known as the Second Great Awakening, John Humphrey Noyes, a spirited but socially awkward young man, attracted a group of devoted followers with his fiery sermons about creating Jesus' millennial kingdom here on Earth. Noyes established a revolutionary community in rural New York centered around achieving a life free of sin through God's grace, while also espousing equality of the sexes and "complex marriage," a system of free love where sexual relations with multiple partners was encouraged. When the Community disbanded in 1880, the Oneida Community, Limited, would go on to become one of the nation's leading manufacturers of silverware, and their brand a coveted mark of middle-class respectability in pre- and post-WWII America.

Upcoming sessions

Saturday, June 24 -
10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Community Room

Lunch and a Book June 2017

Please join Lunch and a Book to discuss:

A man called Ove : a novel by Fredrik Backman
Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook

Meet Ove. He’s a curmudgeon—the kind of man who points at people he dislikes as if they were burglars caught outside his bedroom window. He has staunch principles, strict routines, and a short fuse. People call him “the bitter neighbor from hell.” But must Ove be bitter just because he doesn’t walk around with a smile plastered to his face all the time? Behind the cranky exterior there is a story and a sadness. So when one November morning a chatty young couple with two chatty young daughters move in next door and accidentally flatten Ove’s mailbox, it is the lead-in to a comical and heartwarming tale of unkempt cats, unexpected friendship, and the ancient art of backing up a U-Haul.

Upcoming sessions

Thursday, June 8 -
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
Community Room

Curious about why Denmark has topped lists as the world's happiest country? Explore the vibrant culture of this northern land and find out.

How is it that these 5.6 million Danes are so content when they live in a country that is dark and cold nine months of the year and where income taxes are at almost 60 percent? At a time when talk across the Western world is focused on unemployment woes, government overreach, and anti-taxation lobbies, our Danish counterparts seem to breathe a healthier and fresher air. Interweaving anecdotes and research, Malene Rydahl explores how the values of trust, education, and a healthy work-life balance with  purpose—to name just a few—contribute to a “happy” population.

When she was given the opportunity of a new life in rural Jutland, journalist and archetypal Londoner Helen Russell discovered a startling statistic: the happiest place on earth is Denmark, a land often thought of by foreigners as consisting entirely of long dark winters, cured herring, Lego and pastries. What is the secret to their success? Are happy Danes born, or made? Helen gives herself a year to uncover the formula for Danish happiness. The Year of Living Danishly is a funny, poignant record of a journey that shows us where the Danes get it right, where they get it wrong, and how we might just benefit from living a little more Danishly ourselves.

The centuries-old Danish tradition of Hygge (pronounced "hue-gah") is a special custom of emotional warmth, slowness, and appreciation, and it is becoming increasingly familiar to an international audience. To hygge means to enjoy the good things in life with good people.

Lunch and a Book May 2017

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Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook

In what is perhaps her richest and most deeply searching novel, Anne Tyler gives us a story about what it is to be an American, and about Maryam Yazdan, who after Thirty-five years in this country must finally come to terms with her “outsiderness.” Two families, who would otherwise never have come together, meet by chance at the Baltimore airport—the Donaldsons, a very American couple, and the Yazdans, Maryam’s fully assimilated son and his attractive Iranian American wife. Each couple is awaiting the arrival of an adopted infant daughter from Korea. After the babies from distant Asia are delivered, Bitsy Donaldson impulsively invites the Yazdans to celebrate with an “arrival party,” an event that is repeated every year as the two families become more deeply intertwined.

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Nonfiction Book Group May 2017

Please join the Nonfiction Book Group to discuss:

Also available in: e-book | audiobook | large print

Oxford English Dictionary began in 1857, took seventy years to complete, drew from tens of thousands of brilliant minds, and organized the sprawling language into 414,825 precise definitions. Hidden within the rituals of its creation is the story of two remarkable men.

Professor James Murray was the distinguished editor of the OED project. Dr. William Chester Minor was one of thousands of contributors. Minor was remarkably prolific, sending thousands of neat, handwritten quotations from his home in the small village of Crowthorne, fifty miles from Oxford. On numerous occasions, Murray invited Minor to visit Oxford, but Murray's offer was regularly--and mysteriously--refused.

Finally, in 1896, after Minor had sent nearly ten thousand definitions to the dictionary, a puzzled Murray set out to visit him. It was then that Murray finally learned that Minor was a murderer locked up in Broadmoor, England's harshest asylum for criminal lunatics.

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Libby is a new mobile app from OverDrive designed to make borrowing and enjoying e-books and e-audiobooks easier than ever.

You can use Libby in place of, or in addition to, the OverDrive app. Of course, you can also continue to use the OverDrive app exclusively if you'd rather not try Libby at this time. 

You can install Libby from Google Play or the Apple App Store. Libby is currently compatible with:

Android 4.4 or higher
iOS 9 or higher

Ready to give Libby a try? Take a look at our instructions, or visit OverDrive's Libby Help Page for even more information.

Travel can be enlightening, enjoyable... and expensive. We've gathered together ideas for those who want to expand their horizons without emptying their wallets.

Getting Started

Many sources of travel guides have information online for budget traveling. These can be a great place to gather ideas.

Or check out the books 

Nonfiction Book Group April 2017

Please join the Nonfiction Book Group to discuss:

Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook

An eye-opening vision of how our relationship to information has transformed the very nature of human consciousness. A fascinating intellectual journey through the history of communication and information, from the language of Africa's talking drums to the invention of written alphabets; from the electronic transmission of code to the origins of information theory, into the new information age and the current deluge of news, tweets, images, and blogs.

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Lunch and a Book April 2017

Please join Lunch and a Book to discuss:

Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook

Bestselling author Atul Gawande tackles the hardest challenge of his profession: how medicine can not only improve life but also the process of its ending. Medicine has triumphed in modern times, transforming birth, injury, and infectious disease from harrowing to manageable. But in the inevitable condition of aging and death, the goals of medicine seem too frequently to run counter to the interest of the human spirit. Full of eye-opening research and riveting storytelling, Being Mortal asserts that medicine can comfort and enhance our experience even to the end, providing not only a good life but also a good end.

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Nonfiction Book Group March 2017

Please join the Nonfiction Book Group to discuss:

Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook

What moves the world is what moves each of us: desire. Jewelry—which has long served as a stand-in for wealth and power, glamor and success—has birthed cultural movements, launched political dynasties, and started wars. Masterfully weaving together pop science and history, Stoned explains what the diamond on your finger has to do with the GI Bill, why green-tinted jewelry has been exalted by so many cultures, why the glass beads that bought Manhattan for the Dutch were initially considered a fair trade, and how the French Revolution started over a coveted necklace.

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

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