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Winter Outlook

What will the weather be like this winter? The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Climate Prediction Center has made weather predictions in their Winter Outlook.
[Photo courtesy of AccuNet/AP Photo.]

Today in Religious History, November 24th

  • 1703 — In Philadelphia, German-born pastor and hymnwriter Justus Falckner, 31, became the first Lutheran clergyman to be ordained in America
  • 1713 — Birth of Father Junipero Serra, Spanish missionary to western America. From 1769, he established 9 of the first 21 Franciscan missions founded along the Pacific coast, and baptized some 6,000 Indians before his death in 1784. For more on him, see Serra Junipero in our catalog
  • 1838 — Canadian Sulpician missionary Franois Blanchet, 43, first arrived in the Oregon Territory. A native of Quebec, he spent 45 years planting churches in the American Northwest, and is remembered today as the "Apostle of Oregon."
  • 1880 — In Montgomery, AL, more than 150 delegates from Baptist churches in 11 states met to form the Baptist Foreign Missions Convention of the United States.

Week 5 - About Your Interests and Hobbies

Help Us Help YouIn order to help develop programs and services, the CPL would like to know more about your interests and hobbies.

Week 4 - About You and Technology

Help Us Help YouAs CPL strives to keep up with the latest and greatest of everything, it's important to know where you stand on using technology.

3rd Week - About Your Education/Work

Help Us Help YouTell us about yourself in terms of your education and career. We'd like to understand how much of your life is devoted to work.

Week 2 - About Your Lifestyle

Help Us Help YouNow that we know a little more about YOU, we'd like to understand more about your home-life, your family, your lifestyle. This week in the comments, let's talk about lifestyle. How would you describe yourself in terms of personal lifestyle or culture?

Pearl's Picks for October 2009

The Night Inspector: A Novel - by Frederick Busch
Frederick Busch's novel The Night Inspector isn't nearly as well known as it should be. (In fact, I fear that Busch himself is known to a relatively small group of readers.) The Night Inspector will please fans of historical fiction, those who simply love good writing, and anyone interested in the life and times of Herman Melville, author of Moby Dick and other works. The novel takes place mainly in Manhattan, just after the end of the War Between the States. The main character, Will Bartholomew, spent his army years as a Union sharpshooter, until the day a bullet from an enemy's gun horribly disfigured him. Because most of his face was shot away, Bartholomew now wears a papier-mâché mask at all times. Along with Herman Melville, now working as a customs inspector with his writing career apparently at an end, and Jessie, a beautiful Creole prostitute, Bartholomew concocts a plan to rescue a group of black children who are still being held by their owners, despite the abolishment of slavery. Busch has captured in vivid, evocative prose New York of the late 1860s, with its chasms between social classes, its casual cruelties, and its myriad of pleasures and dangers. At the same time, the flashbacks describing Bartholomew's experiences during the Civil War are graphic enough to give most readers nightmares. Sadly, Frederick Busch died when he was only 65; the literary world lost a great teacher and a productive, imaginative writer. If you've never read anything by him, drop everything and start now. Two of my favorite books of his are Girls and Harry and Catherine, but Don't Tell Anyone is an amazing collection of short stories. In fact, except for Busch's Closing Arguments, a novel which somewhat freaked me out, I can honestly recommend without reservation everything that Busch wrote.

Game Night Tweetup

A get-together to play some card, board, or other games in casual company. Farkle, Apples to Apples, decks of cards, and a few other games will be provided; though you're welcome to bring your own. Refreshments and giveaways are tentative.

When: Wednesday, September 23rd, 6:30-8:45PM
In the CPL Community Room
Updates @CantonLibrary, event page at twtvite

Help Us Help You - Week 1 (of 5) - About YOU

Help Us Help YouEach week we will have a blog post in which members of the CPL community can respond to get know one another. Your feedback will also be included in the Help Us Help You research and help focus our efforts. Please sign in and take our survey. If you wish to remain anonymous, you may also take the survey without signing in.

This week we would like to know (in the comments) — What inspires you?

Pearl's Picks for August 2009

A Final Arc of Sky: A Memoir of Critical Care - by Jennifer Culkin
Jennifer Culkin’s affecting and effective A Final Arc of Sky: A Memoir of Critical Care is primarily an account of her experiences working as an emergency flight nurse on board a helicopter (an Agusta A109A for those whirlybird aficionados among you) in the state of Washington. But as we read about her attempts to keep heart attack and trauma victims alive while en route to the nearest hospital, we also gain insights into her personal life and her views on parenting, family relationships, and religion. As difficult as emergency medical care is under the best of circumstances (i.e., in a hospital setting), Culkin helps us see how the difficulty and danger are ratcheted up when you’re 8,000 feet up in the air and several hundred miles from the nearest hospital, working in the cramped confines of a chopper’s cabin. Some of the saddest parts of the book are where she describes the deaths of close friends and co-workers (in helicopter accidents) and her mother’s difficult death. Constantly living with life and death tempers a person, I believe, and Culkin is not only the kind of nurse I think we all dream of encountering when we’re in need of emergency care, but the sort of writer whose words and wisdom we can cherish.

New Site Features

We recently launched many new features on the site that you should check out:

Community

In the Community section, you'll find the Community page, with all content made by Canton users. From there, you can go to our Forums, which are a great place to start a conversation with local people about whatever interests you.

We also revamped our local business and club database, Everything Canton. Now you can add your own entries and edit them at your leisure. If you look through the database and find something you like, you can add a star rating and comment.

May We Suggest?

The May We Suggest service provides you with personalized book recommendations. In the future, all such recommendations can be viewed at the May We Suggest blog.

Text This

From any item in the catalog, you can now send a text message to your phone with the Call Number and Title of the item you're viewing. This is useful if you want to look for it later.

Tweet This

All of our blog posts now have a 'Tweet This' icon, so you can quickly tweet about the blogs you like on Twitter. Learn more about Twitter here.


Please let us know how we can improve the site to better fit your needs!

tutor.com removed

We have cancelled our subscription to tutor.com. For any service and/or homework-related questions, please refer to our Ask a Librarian page. Thank you for your understanding.

Summer Reading 2009

Summer Reading sign-up starts June 15th for all ages. Complete your reading log by August 12th for a really fantastic prize!
Check the applicable section below for your reading level — reading logs are available for all age groups, and include rules, prize information, and more.
We will be blogging about Summer Reading for the next few months. You can see all the posts at the Summer Reading Blog Page.

Excel Tips &Tricks

March 25, 6:30-8:30PM

Want to enhance your Excel productivity? Learn the latest tips and tricks in Microsoft Excel 2007. Prerequisite: Excel I or equivalent.