The true story of how Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein uncovered the White House involvement in the Watergate break in.

On the morning of September 9, 2004, veteran CBS News producer Mary Mapes believed she had every reason to feel proud of a broadcast journalism job well done. By the end of the day, Mapes, CBS News, and the venerable CBS News anchor Dan Rather would be under harsh scrutiny that would finally cost them their careers.

Guy Hamilton, an ambitious Australian reporter on his first overseas assignment, is befriended by a Eurasian cameraman, Billy Kwan, with connections in high places. Hamilton soon gains an entree to Indonesian Communist Party leaders, as well as insight into Jakarta's grim realities on the eve of a major political upheaval.

May 3 has been designated as World Press Freedom Day in recognition of a "free, pluralistic and independent press" and its essential part of a democratic society. Indeed, the purpose of journalism, said Chicago newspaper columnist and humorist Peter Finley Dunne in the early 1900s, is to "comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable."  And in the words of President Barack Obama: "Journalists give all of us as citizens the chance to know the truth about our countries, ourselves, our governments. That makes us better, it makes us stronger, it gives voice to the voiceless,  it exposes injustice, and holds leaders like me accountable."

Fascism : a warning by Madeleine Korbel Albright

A brilliant reconsideration of the events and the political, social, and religious movements that led to France's embrace of Fascism and anti-Semitism. 

"Where is America's Rust Belt? It's not quite a geographic region but a linguistic one, first introduced as a concept in 1984 by Walter Mondale. In the modern vernacular, it's closely associated with the "Post-Industrial Midwest," and includes Michigan, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, as well as parts of Illinois, Wisconsin, and New York. The region reflects the country's manufacturing center, which, over the past forty years, has been in decline. The anthology is a collection of the best non-fiction essays published in Belt Magazine, a critically-acclaimed regional magazine, and has been artfully put together by publisher and founder Anne Trubek.

How Scott Pruitt went from fighting the EPA to running the agency and rolling back years of policy. An investigation into the conservative political forces and causes, like climate change skepticism, that propelled Pruitt's takeover of the EPA.

Examines possible motives behind the Russian government's interference in the 2016 U.S. election.

Examines dictator Kim Jong-un and North Korea through interviews with a defector, diplomats, experts, Kim's school friends, and a former North Korean secret agent.

Correspondent Martin Smith travels to Syria to report on the ongoing conflict, getting firsthand accounts from Syrians living in government-controlled areas.

In The Home that Was My Country, Syrian-American journalist Alia Malek chronicles her return to her family home in Damascus and the history of the Jabban apartment building. Here, generations of Christians, Jews, Muslims, and Armenians lived, worked, loved, and suffered in close quarters. In telling the story of her family over the course of the last century, Alia brings to light the triumphs and failures that have led Syria to where it is today. 

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. on April 4, 1968.

On April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. was fatally shot as he stood on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis. At the time of his murder, King was a polarizing figure -- scorned by many white Americans, worshipped by some African Americans and liberal whites, and deemed irrelevant by many black youth. In The Heavens Might Crack, historian Jason Sokol traces the diverse responses, both in America and throughout the world, to King's death. Whether celebrating or mourning, most agreed that the final flicker of hope for a multiracial America had been extinguished. A deeply moving account of a country coming to terms with an act of shocking violence.

Julie Harris takes viewers into Emily Dickinson's everyday world in a small New England town, from her father's mansion in Amherst, Massachusetts, to Amherst College and Mount Holyoke College, to couple and contrast facts and insights about the poet.

One of the most-recognized figures in American literary history: poet, patriot, and faithful advocate of democracy. But in his own time, critics denounced Walt Whitman as a "lunatic raving in pitiable delirium." This "American experience" production tells Whitman's life story, from his working class childhood in Long Island to his years as a newspaper reporter in Brooklyn when he struggled to support his impoverished family, then to his reckless pursuit of the attention and affection he craved for his work, to his death in 1892 at the age of 72.

An exploration into the life and work of the iconic American, Carl Sandburg. From an impoverished youth on the prairie of Illinois to the halls of Congress and international notoriety, it was a tale of perseverance and success. During his lifetime he was revered, becoming one of the most successful writers of the 20th century, but when he died in 1967, his legacy suffered an unusual an inexplicably fast decline. His work was disparaged and his remarkable life all but forgotten..

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