September 1, 1939. Hitler's armies invaded Poland, igniting the start of World War Ii.

September 2, 1666. The Great Fire of London began, raging for three days.

September 3, 1783. The Treaty of Paris, ending the Revolutionary War, was signed by John Adams, Ben Franklin and John Jay.

Centuries ago, Europeans desperate for gold and a route to the East found a lush, green paradise populated by native tribes in the New World. Despite a clash of cultures, cooperation created the fur trade that dominated early Michigan history. Subsequent violence and disease all but wiped out the native population. Later, intrepid residents crossed the frozen Straits of Mackinac on foot and then built the famous Mackinac Bridge. The land nurtured Charlton Heston and Ernest Hemingway in their youths and spawned the assassin of President William McKinley. Northern Michigan also bore witness to the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald, one of the worst shipwrecks in Great Lakes history.

A CBS correspondent presents an in-depth examination of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential campaign and measures to protect US voting systems against future cyber attacks.

Anne Frank : the biography by Melissa Müller

August 1, 1944.  Anne Frank wrote her last entry into her diary. Three days later, Anne and her family were arrested and sent to Nazi concentration camps.

Columbus : the four voyages by Laurence Bergreen

August 3, 1492.  Christopher Columbus set sail from Spain, with three ships, the Nina, the Pinta and the Santa Maria.

August 6, 1945.  The first atomic bomb was dropped on the city  of Hiroshima, Japan  by the American B-29 bomber Enola Gay.

From elaborate Victorian cat funerals to a Regency era pony who took a ride in a hot air balloon, Mimi Matthews shares some of the quirkiest and most poignant animal tales of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Meet Fortune, the Pug who bit Napoleon on his wedding night, and Looty, the Pekingese sleeve dog who was presented to Queen Victoria after the 1860 sacking of the Summer Palace in Peking. The four-legged friends of Lord Byron, Emily Bront , and Prince Albert also make an appearance, as do the treasured pets of Alexander Pope, Samuel Johnson, and Charles Dickens. Less famous, but no less fascinating, are the animals that were the subject of historical lawsuits, scandals, and public curiosity.

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