It's been 50 years since the country experienced one of the most turbulent years in American  - and world - history. The Tet Offensive in Vietnam, the assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy, numerous anti-war protests across the nation, the My Lai Massacre, violent police clashes with anti-war protesters at the Democratic National Convention, the seizure of the USS Pueblo by North Korea, student riots  in Paris - these are just some of the seismic events that occurred in 1968. Yet, there were some bright spots to celebrate as well. The astronauts on Apollo 8 became the first humans to orbit the moon, the Beatles launched Apple Records, and the Detroit Tigers won their first World Series since 1945.

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This probing and perceptive biography reassesses the remarkable and tragic life of the third Kennedy son, Robert Francis Kennedy - a man who would almost certainly have been president if his violent assassination hadn't intervened. Features extensive interviews with family members, friends, journalists, Washington insiders, and civil rights activists. Profiles the pivotal roles RFK played in the many major events of the 1960's - the Cuban Missile Crisis, the civil rights movement, and the war in Vietnam.

June 4, 1989. In Beijing's Tiananmen Square, unarmed protestors are fired upon by soldiers on order from the Chinese government.

June 5, 1968. Senator Robert F. Kennedy is assassinated in a  Los Angeles hotel shortly after winning California's Democratic presidential primary.

June 6, 1872.  Susan B. Anthony was fined for voting in a presidential election in Rochester, New York.

Nikola Tesla invented the radio, robots, and remote control. His electric induction motors run our appliances and factories, yet he has been largely overlooked by history. In this biography, the author presents a comprehensive portrait of this farsighted and underappreciated mastermind.

Robin by Dave Itzkoff

One of George Washington's most able subordinates, Anthony Wayne's military performance during and after the Revolutionary war is a story that needs to be more widely known.

Detroit is known for its automotive heritage, the Motown sound and American's first mile of concrete highway. But this city on the river has more than three hundred years of history, and most of it is easy to experience if you know where to look. There's the Michigan Theatre, the ornate movie house turned parking garage with a grand stage looming over its cars. Picturesque Alfred Brush Ford Park has the remnants of missile radar towers that connected to their Nike counterparts once buried on Belle Isle. Then there are incredible landmarks like Detroit's massive salt mines, a monument to urban graffiti known as the Dequindre Cut as well as Baker's, the world's oldest operating jazz club.

America has long been criticized for refusing to give harbor to the Jews of Europe as Hitler and the Nazis closed in. Now a U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum scholar tells the extraordinary story of the War Refugee Board, President Franklin D. Roosevelt's little-known effort late in the war to save the Jews who remained.

The long-running "Ask a North Korean" column produced by NK News in Washington D.C. invites readers to ask questions of recent North Korean defectors about everyday issues that are not generally discussed in the media. Various aspects of life in North Korea are discussed in this book through a series of interviews . These interviews show that even in the world's most authoritarian regime, there is still a degree of normality and continuity..

The most definitive biography to date of the poet Pablo Neruda, a moving portrait of one of the most intriguing and influential figures in Latin American history.

The masterful and poignant story of three African-American families who journeyed west after emancipation, by an award-winning scholar and descendant of the migrants. Following the lead of her own ancestors, Kendra Field's epic family history chronicles the westward migration of freedom's first generation in the fifty years after emancipation. Drawing on decades of archival research and family lore within and beyond the United States, Field traces their journey out of the South to Indian Territory, where they participated in the development of black and black Indian towns and settlements.

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