We owe the celebration of Black History Month to Dr. Carter G. Woodson, the son of slaves who went on to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard. He launched Negro History Week in 1926 in order to bring national attention to the contributions of blacks throughout American history. Woodson chose the second week of February for this recognition because it marks the birthdays of two men whose lives greatly influenced the black American population — Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. The celebration evolved into Black History Month (also known as African-American History Month) - in 1976.

The PBS series Victoria returns on January 13, 2019. You can learn more about this historic monarch in the meantime by checking out some of the many resources available at the Library.

Victoria : a life by A. N. Wilson

The National Film Registry of the Library of Congress recently announced its list of inductees for 2018. Established in 1989, the films are selected for their enduring importance to United States culture. For a history of the Film Registry you can watch the fascinating documentary These amazing shadows: the movies that made America. Titles available in the Library's collection can be found below. The entire list — complete with film history — can be found here.

Time has selected "The Guardians" of the free press as this year's Person of the Year.  Hailing them for "taking great risks in pursuit of greater truths" in what the magazine called a "war on truth," the magazine singled out four different journalists or news organizations to be featured on four different covers. Those honored will be murdered Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi; staff members of the Capitol Gazette in Annapolis, Maryland: Maria Ressa of the Rappler news site in the Philippines; and Reuters journalists Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo who have been imprisoned in Myanmar. To read more about the importance of a free press throughout history check here.

Pages