This September PBS will present Ken Burns' epic ten-part, 18-hour documentary on the Vietnam War. Written by historian Geoffrey C. Ward,  and including archival footage and historic television broadcasts, it was six years in the making.

The best and the brightest by David Halberstam

Profiles everyday life in fourteenth-century England, covering everything from period beliefs and styles to hygiene and medical practices, and also discusses the influence of warfare.

My beloved world by Sonia Sotomayor

The first Hispanic on the U.S. Supreme Court tells the story of her life before becoming a judge in an inspiring, surprisingly personal memoir. With startling candor and intimacy, Sonia Sotomayor recounts her life from a Bronx housing project to the federal bench, a progress that is testament to her extraordinary determination and the power of believing in oneself.

The Fearless Benjamin Lay chronicles the transatlantic life and times of a singular and astonishing man--a Quaker dwarf who became one of the first ever to demand the total, unconditional emancipation of all enslaved Africans around the world.

National Hispanic Heritage Month is celebrated from mid-September through mid-October each year. The resources below provide an introduction to the culture and identity of the diverse population that is Hispanic. For information on the culture and customs of specific Latin American countries click here.

September 1, 1939. Hitler's armies invaded Poland, igniting the start of World War Ii.

September 2, 1666. The Great Fire of London began, raging for three days.

September 3, 1783. The Treaty of Paris, ending the Revolutionary War, was signed by John Adams, Ben Franklin and John Jay.

In this memoir of his time as a successful diplomat serving in various key capacities and as a member of Mikhail Gorbachev's staff, Kovalev reveals hard truths about his country as only a perceptive witness can do. In Russia's Dead End Kovalev shares his intimate knowledge of political activities behind the scenes at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Kremlin before and after the dissolution of the USSR in December 1991, including the Russia of Vladimir Putin. He documents the fall of the USSR, the post-Soviet explosion of state terrorism and propaganda, and offers a nuanced historical explanation of the roots of Russia's contemporary crisis under Vladimir Putin.

This timely book focuses on President Obama's deeply considered strategy toward Iran's nuclear program and reveals how the historic agreement of 2015 broke the persistent stalemate in negotiations that had blocked earlier efforts. The deal accomplished two major feats in one stroke: it averted the threat of war with Iran and prevented the possibility of an Iranian nuclear bomb. .

The Detroit riot of 1967 by Hubert G Locke

During the last days of July 1967, Detroit experienced a week of devastating urban collapse-one of the worst civil disorders in twentieth-century America. Forty-three people were killed, over $50 million in property was destroyed, and the city itself was left in a state of panic and confusion, the scars of which are still present today. Now for the first time in paperback and with a new reflective essay that examines the events a half-century later, The Detroit Riot of 1967 (originally published in 1969) tells the story from the perspective of Hubert G. Locke, then administrative aide to Detroit's police commissioner. An hour-by-hour account is given of the looting, arson, and sniping, as well as the problems faced by the police, National Guard, and federal troops who struggled to restore order.

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