Veterans Day originated as “Armistice Day” on Nov. 11, 1919, the first anniversary of the end of World War I. Congress passed a resolution in 1926 for an annual observance, and Nov. 11 became a national holiday beginning in 1938. Unlike Memorial Day, Veterans Day pays tribute to all American veterans—living or dead—but especially gives thanks to living veterans who served their country honorably during war or peacetime. 

Celebrate Veterans Day and read one of the books linked below to celebrate and honor our veterans. 

-Information on Veterans Day was gathered at History.com 
 

The Frank show by David Mackintosh

These books feature spooky, but not scary, characters and themes to enjoy on a dark and stormy night. (Nefarious laugh optional)

Boogie Bones by Elizabeth Loredo
Bone dog by Eric Rohmann
How to knit a monster by illustrator Annemarie van Haeringen
Monster munch by 1980- Tobias Krejtschi
Ghosts by Sonia Goldie

Do you like to read books about creepy stuff, but don't want to be scared? These books feature paranormal characters without being scary. 

The underground ghosts by Dori Hillestad Butler
Lunch walks among us by James K Benton

The armistice, signed on July 27, established a committee of representatives from neutral countries to decide the fate of the thousands of prisoners of war on both sides. It was eventually decided that the POWs could choose their own fate–stay where they were or return to their homelands. A new border between North and South Korea was drawn, which gave South Korea some additional territory and demilitarized the zone between the two nations. The war cost the lives of millions of Koreans and Chinese, as well as over 50,000 Americans. -Source: History.com

Children's Books

The Korean War by Thomas Streissguth

Offers an overview of the Korean War, including how it began, the invasion of Sout Korea, important battles, how it ended, and the truce that followed.

There are so many wonderful shows available from multiple places these days, but did you know that many of them were books first? Scroll down to see which of your favorite shows were based on a printed format originally, then check out one to compare or see what is in store for the next season, or read it before your pick premiers. 

Lucifer is on Netflix. From the pages of THE SANDMAN, Lucifer Morningstar, the former Lord of Hell, is unexpectedly called back into action when he receives a mission from Heaven. Given free reign to use any means necessary, Lucifer is promised a prize of his own choosing if he fulfills this holy request. But once he completes his mission, the Prince of Darkness' demand shakes the foundation of Heaven and Hell. Now as his enemies unite to stop his reemergence, Lucifer gathers his forces as he prepares to launch his new revolution.

Queen sugar by Natalie Baszile

Queen Sugar on OWN. A mother-daughter story of reinvention-about an African American woman who unexpectedly inherits a sugarcane farm in Louisiana. Why exactly Charley Bordelon's late father left her eight hundred sprawling acres of sugarcane land in rural Louisiana is as mysterious as it was generous. Recognizing this as a chance to start over, Charley and her eleven-year-old daughter, Micah, say good-bye to Los Angeles. They arrive just in time for growing season but no amount of planning can prepare Charley for a Louisiana that's mired in the past: as her judgmental but big-hearted grandmother tells her, cane farming is always going to be a white man's business. As the sweltering summer unfolds, Charley must balance the overwhelming challenges of her farm with the demands of a homesick daughter, a bitter and troubled brother, and the startling desires of her own heart. Penguin has a rich tradition of publishing strong Southern debut fiction-from Sue Monk Kidd to Kathryn Stockett to Beth Hoffman. In Queen Sugar, we now have a debut from the African American point of view. Stirring in its storytelling of one woman against the odds and initimate in its exploration of the complexities of contemporary southern life, Queen Sugar is an unforgettable tale of endurance and hope"--.

The books below are part of an extensive collection as compiled by Dr. Jonda S. McNair, professor of literacy education at Clemson University in South Carolina. 

Schomburg : the man who built a library by Carole Boston Weatherford

Traces legal clerk Arturo Schomburg's efforts to curate a collection of African books, letters, music, and art.

The books are all memoirs that are fun to read or listen to. Enjoy one today! 

Also available in: e-book | audiobook

Born a Crime is the story of a mischievous young boy who grows into a restless young man as he struggles to find himself in a world where he was never supposed to exist. It is also the story of that young man's relationship with his fearless, rebellious, and fervently religious mother--his teammate, a woman determined to save her son from the cycle of poverty, violence, and abuse that would ultimately threaten her own life. The stories collected here are by turns hilarious, dramatic, and deeply affecting. Whether subsisting on caterpillars for dinner during hard times, being thrown from a moving car during an attempted kidnapping, or just trying to survive the life-and-death pitfalls of dating in high school, Trevor illuminates his curious world with an incisive wit and unflinching honesty. His stories weave together to form a moving and searingly funny portrait of a boy making his way through a damaged world in a dangerous time, armed only with a keen sense of humor and a mother's unconventional, unconditional love. 

Also available in: e-book | audiobook

Jenny Lawson explores her lifelong battle with mental illness. A hysterical, ridiculous book about crippling depression and anxiety? That sounds like a terrible idea. But terrible ideas are what Jenny does best. As Jenny says : "Some people might think that being 'furiously happy' is just an excuse to be stupid and irresponsible and invite a herd of kangaroos over to your house without telling your husband first because you suspect he would say no since he's never particularly liked kangaroos. And that would be ridiculous because no one would invite a herd of kangaroos into their house. Two is the limit. I speak from personal experience. My husband says that none is the new limit. I say he should have been clearer about that before I rented all those kangaroos.

Lets throwback to some oldies but goodies in chapter and picture books! 

Imogene's antlers by David Small

One Thursday Imogene wakes up with a pair of antlers growing out of her head and causes a sensation wherever she goes.

Half magic by Edward Eager

Faced with a dull summer in the city, Jane, Mark, Katharine, and Martha suddenly find themselves involved in a series of extraordinary adventures after Jane discovers an ordinary-looking coin that seems to grant wishes.

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