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madame librarian's Blog

No Pot of Gold at the end of the Reading Rainbow

Sadly, PBS's Reading Rainbow aired its final episode on Friday, August 28 after 26 outstanding years. Why? According to John Grant, the head of content at WNED Buffalo, Reading Rainbow's home station, PBS, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and the Department of Education are all unwilling to pour funding into programs that don't teach children how to read. Reading Rainbow's focus has always been on the why of reading and using an interest in books to encourage children to become more interested in learning to read better. Unfortunately, there just doesn't seem to be enough money, or interest, to fund both types of programs, and Reading Rainbow has gotten the ax. Gee, I thought it was my responsibility as a parent and schools as institutions of learning to teach reading basics and television's responsibility to broaden our knowledge? 

Outside Our Borders

If you are interested in reading about new cultures or how we adapt or don't adapt may we suggest...


More Online Resources for Michigan Seniors

The Michigan Attorney General's office has established an online resource center for Michigan's seniors at Senior Brigade. This website is a clearinghouse for helpful information on consumer protection, financial matters, health care issues and veterans' services. It provides links to a wide variety of state and federal programs to help make informed decisions that can benefit you and your family. A calendar of senior events around the state is also available. The website is maintained by Attorney General Mike Cox's office.

Sisters in Crime Announce Davitt Awards

This year 39 crime books competed for the Davitt Awards which were set up by Sisters in Crime in 2001 to celebrate the achievements of Australian women crime writers. Justice Betty King presented the awards to a crowd of 140 at the Celtic Club. For the third year running, the awards were sponsored by the Victoria Police Museum.

Beautiful Place To Die (PanMacmillan), the debut novel by Sydney-based filmmaker turned crime writer, Malla Nunn, tonight won Sisters in Crime’s Davitt Awards for the best (adult) crime novel by an Australian woman in 2008.

Blue Mountains writer Catherine Jinks took out the Davitt (young adult) for Genius Squad (Allen & Unwin)

Retire Online

The Social Security office recently launched a national campaign "Retire Online. It's So Easy!" This campaign features a new online retirement application that can be completed in as little as 15 minutes. The application is available online and can easily be completed at any of our library computers.

Shamus Award Nominees Announced

The Private Eye Writers of America announced the nominees for the 28th. Annual Shamus Awards on Friday. Eleven of the fifteen novels nominated are available at our library. Which book(s) do you choose for the three categories: Best Hardcover, Best First PI Novel, and Best Paperbook?

To Be Read

I recently 'stumbled' upon Goodreads and added it to my list of websites for TBR [To Be Read] suggestions. Of course, that's the whole idea of this blog, so when a request for historical mysteries writers came up, these authors immediately came to mind: Alys Clare, Peter Tremayne, Margaret Frazer, Ariana Franklin, and Alan Gordon.

Fifth Annual Western Wayne County Senior Olympics

Men and women, 50 years and older, will compete in the Western Wayne Senior Olympics August 17 through August 21, 2009. A complete schedule of events is available at Canton Seniors Leisure Services.

Kay Scarpetta On Film

Patricia Cornwell's Kay Scarpetta mystery series is coming to the big screen. None other than Angelina Jolie will play Ms. Scarpetta. Producers Mark Gordon and Geyer Kosinski are hoping for a franchise out of Ms. Cornwell's books, though none of the films will necessarily follow the plotline of any particular tome. According to Variety,

This film won't be tied to a specific Cornwell mystery title. Much the way that Jason Bourne morphed into an action hero in plots not rigidly locked into the Robert Ludlum book series, the opera-loving coroner Scarpetta will be the lead in a suspense thriller in the vein of "The Silence of the Lambs" and "Seven."

Third Strike

William G. Tapply, author of the Boston lawyer-turned crime-solver Brady Coyne mystery series, died of leukemia Tuesday, July 28 at his Hancock, NH home. He was 69. He was known also for his collected essays, a book about his father, and his articles and columns in "Field & Stream" and other magazines. Mr. Tapply had also introduced a new series featuring Stoney Calhoun in 2004. The third book in this series will be published posthumously, this fall.

In the Shadow of Gotham

In the Shadow of Gotham, Stefanie Pintoff's debut, won the first Minotaur Books/MWA Best First Crime Novel award. It's the Twentieth Century and crime detection has begun to take advantage of the new sciences available: fingerprints, profiling. Detective Simon Ziele has moved to Dobson, a small town in New York's Westchester county, a train-ride from New York City, following the tragic death of his fiance in the wreck of the steamship General Slocum in 1904. Ziele had been one of the NYC detectives called to scene to rescue survivors, but he was unable to save Rachel, his fiance.

Growing Bolder as You Grow Older

Catch the podcast about 89 year old Rachel Veitch on Growing Bolder and her 1964 Mercury Caliente. She's the original owner, she's put over 550,000 miles on it traveling around the country, and as she points out, her car has lasted longer than her 3 marriages. Rachel puts a lot of TLC into the car: tune-ups on schedule and purchasing parts with life-time warranties. She's replaced 6 car batteries over the past 35 years at no cost. (Image: Google Images)

Canton Senior Book Discussion 2009 - November 18

The Art of Mending by Elizabeth Berg. Laura Bartone anticipates her annual family reunion in Minnesota with a mixture of excitement and wariness. Yet this year’s gathering will prove to be much more trying than either she or her siblings imagined. As soon as she arrives, Laura realizes that something is not right with her sister. Forever wrapped up in events of long ago, Caroline is the family’s restless black sheep. When Caroline confronts Laura and their brother, Steve, with devastating allegations about their mother, the three have a difficult time reconciling their varying experiences in the same house. But a sudden misfortune will lead them all to face the past, their own culpability, and their common need for love and forgiveness.

Canton Seniors Book Discussion - September 23, 2009

March by Geraldine Brooks. From Louisa May Alcotts beloved classic Little Women, Geraldine Brooks has taken the character of the absent father, March, who has gone off to war, leaving his wife and daughters to make do in mean times. In her telling, March emerges as an idealistic chaplain in the little known backwaters of a war that will test his faith in himself and in the Union cause as he learns that his side, too, is capable of acts of barbarism and racism. As he recovers from a near mortal illness, he must reassemble his shattered mind and body and find a way to reconnect with a wife and daughters who have no idea of the ordeals he has been through. Pulitzer Prize Winner for Fiction (2006). Beginning August 26, you can pick up a copy of MARCH at the Adult Reference Desk.