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Mark Twain

April 21 is the 100 year anniversary of the death of Mark Twain (November 24, 1832 - April 21, 1910). A keen observer of human nature, Twain's stories portray America as it became a nation. An American humorist, lecturer, essayist, and author, several of Twain's books have been adapted for the screen including The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Life on the Mississippi, and a present-day version of The Prince and the Pauper.

Immigration, Islam, and Identity: A Conversation with Eli Eteraz

Children of Dust a memoir written by Ali Eteraz reveals Islamic fundamentalism and madrassa life in rural Pakistan, the culture shock of moving to the U.S., and a journey of reconciliation to the modern Middle East. Author Ali Eteraz will speak on Wednesday, April 21st, 2010 at 12:00pm in the University of Michigan's Hatcher Graduate Library, Gallery - Room 100 (use Diag entrance).

Bestsellers In Large Print

Did you know many of your favorite authors are available in Large Print? Their latest book could be on the shelf and available right now. In addition to being easy on the eyes,  or perhaps because Large Print is easier on the eyes, readers of Large Print books comment how quickly they read can read a book... 

Her Mother's Hope by Francine Rivers

A World Without Ice

The Author’s Forum Presents
A World Without Ice: A Conversation with Henry Pollack & Richard Rood

Wednesday, April 14, 2010, 5:30PM
Gallery/Room 100, Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library
913 S. University, Ann Arbor

A World Without Ice is a book about ice and people — the role ice has played in the development of Earth’s landscape, climate, and human civilization, and the reciprocal impact of people on the planet’s ice. Today, U-M’s Henry Pollack and Richard Rood discuss why ice matters, the delicate geological balance between ice and climate, and the pending crisis of a world without ice.

Computers @ Your Public Library

In a recent article by Donna Gordon Blankenship of the Associated Press, a third of Americans 14 and older — about 77 million people — use public library computers to look for jobs, connect with friends, do their homework and improve their lives, according to a new study released Thursday, March 25. The study was paid for by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and conducted by the University of Washington Information School. Study researchers were intrigued to find that people across all age and ethnic groups used library computers, said Michael Crandall, one of the principal authors of the study, from the University of Washington Information School.

Chapter Closes on 2010 Great Michigan Read

Within the next two weeks, the Michigan Humanities Council will announce the guest authors at the 2010 Michigan Author Homecoming. The event will be held on May 18 in East Lansing and on May 20 in Marquette. It marks the end of the 2009-2010 Great Michigan Read, a book club for the entire state. With a statewide focus on a single book – Stealing Buddha’s Dinner by Bich Minh Nguyen (pronounced bit-min-win) – it encouraged Michiganians to learn more about their state, their history, and the multiplicity of their society.

Online registration for both venues will be required; seating will be limited. Registration will be accessible via the Michigan Humanities Council website.

Watch the Michigan Humanities Council website for more information.

Benefits of Exercise for Older Adults

Looking for a safe, inexpensive, and invigorating way to help maintain your health and independence as you get older? Try adding exercise to your daily routine. When done on a regular basis, exercise and physical activity offer many health benefits and can be a pleasure, especially if you choose activities you enjoy. To find out how to become more physically active, restart a lapsed exercise regimen, or get more benefit from your current exercise program, check out the updated Exercise and Physical Activity for Older Adults topic on NIHSeniorHealth.gov, the health and wellness website for older adults.

Left Coast Crime Convention Awards Announced

The winners of the Left Coast Crime Convention held in Los Angeles this year were announced on March 16. The LCC is an annual event sponsored by fans of Mystery Literature, for fans of Mystery Literature. The intent is to provide an event where fans of the Mystery genre can gather in convivial surroundings to pursue their interest in the genre.

A Trace of Smoke by Rebecca Cantrell is the 2010 Winner of The Bruce Alexander Memorial Historical Mystery Award.

The Ghost Army

In June of 1944, an exceptional U.S. Army unit went into action in Normandy. Its weapons included hundreds of inflatable tanks and a one-of-a-kind collection of sound effects records, and it carried out its battlefield mission without firing a shot. The unit was officially called the 23rd Headquarters Special Troops, but it was known to its men as The Ghost Army. Members of The Ghost Army adhered to a decades-long gag order; many never told their families about their extraordinary military service. Now the Ghost Army is here! Sixty-five years after this top-secret group went into action, the University of Michigan’s Hatcher Library will unveil the first public exhibit of this captivating group of materials documenting The Ghost Army. This exhibit is available during library hours.

Due Process

Canton Public Library is part of the Metro Detroit Everyone's Reading 2010: Presumed Innocent, a legal thriller written by Scott Turow and later made into a movie starring Harrison Ford. On Tuesday, March 23, from 7:00 to 8:30PM in the Community Room, Joyce Simowski (Adult Services Librarian) will share her expertise and love of legal thrillers. She'll talk about a few familiar authors and introduce you to some new authors and their characters as well. The Friends of the Canton Public Library will supply prize baskets to a couple of lucky attendees.
No registration required.

Man of Mystery

Why is there a body in the library's Mystery stacks? He's promoting this year's Everyone's Reading selection Presumed Innocent by Scott Turow.

In conjunction with several Metro Detroit communities, Canton Public Library offers a variety of events including a book talk, book discussions, and a personal appearance by Scott Turow on Wednesday, April 14 at the Village Theater at Cherry Hill. For a chance to win a pair of tickets to hear Mr. Turow in person go to your patron record and register for the ticket drawing.

Core Standards for K-12 Students

The National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers has, as part of the Common Core State Standards Initiative (CCSSI), presented the K-12 standards's draft which is now available for public comment. The draft standards, developed in collaboration with teachers, school administrators, and experts, seeks to provide a clear and consistent framework to prepare our children for college and the workforce. Public comment is encouraged and can be made until Friday, April 2, 2010.

Murder Will Out

To demonstrate their tremendous enthusiasm for crime, mystery, and thriller fiction, the British are planning their first National Crime Fiction Week, to run from June 14 to 20, 2010. This event is sponsored by the Crime Writers Association. CWA members will take part in readings, discussions, readers' group events and workshops all over the country. Your favorite authors are already planning Murders in Libraries, Bodies in Bookshops and Strawberries and Crime at Village Fetes. For more information check out the National Crime Fiction Week website.