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Wii Bowling League

Age Strong! Live Long!
May is Older Americans Month and the focus is on getting strong to live long. So why not join the Senior Wii Bowling league on May 4, 2010 in the library's Community Room? For additional information call Marcia Barker at (734) 397-0999 x1079.

Older Americans Month 2010

Age Strong! Live Long! is the focus of the Administration on Aging's Older Americans Month 2010. National Aging Services Network of state, tribal, Area Agencies on Aging such as The Senior Alliance, and community services providers such as Canton Seniors Center offer a wide variety of activities in May and throughout the year. Via AOA:

This year’s Older Americans Month theme — Age Strong! Live Long! — recognizes the diversity and vitality of today’s older Americans who span three generations. They have lived through wars and hard times, as well as periods of unprecedented prosperity.

Murder Will Out

Dateline April 28, 1930: Nancy Drew, Girl Detective debuts. 80 years later Nancy is still fighting crime, still bringing in the bad guys. More importantly serving as a strong, feminine role-model for thousands of girls. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, Supreme Court Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor, and Oprah Winfrey are fans of Carolyn Keene's creation. Nancy Drew novels have been published in 25 languages and over 200 million copies worldwide have been sold.

Michigan Author Homecoming

The Michigan Humanities Council will present the 2010 Michigan Author Homecoming, "Writing War: Afghanistan, Iraq, Vietnam," with noted writers Benjamin Busch, Philip Caputo, and Doug Stanton
  • May 18 in East Lansing
  • May 20 in Marquette
The events will celebrate the conclusion of the Council’s Great Michigan Read. Each event will be a moderated, panel-style discussion focusing on the impact of war on culture, particularly in relation to recent United States conflicts (Afghanistan, Iraq, and Vietnam). There will be a book signing. Tickets are available online or by phone at (517) 372-7770.

Ann Arbor Book Festival

Don't miss the Ann Arbor Book Festival, May 14-16, featuring poetry readings, Breakfast with the Authors, writers' conferences, and culminating with the Ann Arbor Antiquarian Book Fair on Sunday, May 16.

Murder Will Out

Looking for something new to read? Check out this year’s shortlists for the Edgar Awards, the Hammett Prize, the Agatha Awards, Strand Magazine Critics Awards,  and the

Murder Will Out

Deadly Ink announced the 2010 David G. Sasher, Sr. Award — AKA The David — nominations for the best mystery published during the prior year.  Attendees at the 2010 Deadly Ink Mystery Conference will vote for their favorite, and the winner will be announced at the Saturday Night Awards Banquet. The 2010 Deadly Ink Mystery Conference will be held June 25-27, 2010 at the Parsippany Sheraton in Parsippany, NJ. Gillian Roberts is the Guest of Honor.

7 Ways the Mind and Body Change with Age

A recent article on MSNBC's Lifeline: Health Reports from NBC cited seven (7) ways the mind and body change as we age. Contrary to popular belief, as we age we become more liberal. However, seniors do become more easily distracted, but need less sleep! Skin sags and stem cells reproduction slows down. Seniors laugh more and develop a more positive attitude.

Murder Will Out

During a series of events held across North America’s northernmost nation, the shortlists of books nominated for the 2010 Arthur Ellis Awards were announced on April 22 by the Crime Writers of Canada. The prestigious Arthur Ellis Awards are presented in 6 categories for excellence in works in the crime genre published for the first time in the previous year by authors living in Canada, regardless of their nationality, or by Canadian writers living outside of Canada. The CBC News Web site has a partial rundown, but the following list comes from The Rap Sheet. The winners will be announced during a ceremony on May 27 in Toronto.

Mark Twain

April 21 is the 100 year anniversary of the death of Mark Twain (November 24, 1832 - April 21, 1910). A keen observer of human nature, Twain's stories portray America as it became a nation. An American humorist, lecturer, essayist, and author, several of Twain's books have been adapted for the screen including The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Life on the Mississippi, and a present-day version of The Prince and the Pauper.

Immigration, Islam, and Identity: A Conversation with Eli Eteraz

Children of Dust a memoir written by Ali Eteraz reveals Islamic fundamentalism and madrassa life in rural Pakistan, the culture shock of moving to the U.S., and a journey of reconciliation to the modern Middle East. Author Ali Eteraz will speak on Wednesday, April 21st, 2010 at 12:00pm in the University of Michigan's Hatcher Graduate Library, Gallery - Room 100 (use Diag entrance).

Bestsellers In Large Print

Did you know many of your favorite authors are available in Large Print? Their latest book could be on the shelf and available right now. In addition to being easy on the eyes,  or perhaps because Large Print is easier on the eyes, readers of Large Print books comment how quickly they read can read a book... 

Her Mother's Hope by Francine Rivers

A World Without Ice

The Author’s Forum Presents
A World Without Ice: A Conversation with Henry Pollack & Richard Rood

Wednesday, April 14, 2010, 5:30PM
Gallery/Room 100, Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library
913 S. University, Ann Arbor

A World Without Ice is a book about ice and people — the role ice has played in the development of Earth’s landscape, climate, and human civilization, and the reciprocal impact of people on the planet’s ice. Today, U-M’s Henry Pollack and Richard Rood discuss why ice matters, the delicate geological balance between ice and climate, and the pending crisis of a world without ice.

Computers @ Your Public Library

In a recent article by Donna Gordon Blankenship of the Associated Press, a third of Americans 14 and older — about 77 million people — use public library computers to look for jobs, connect with friends, do their homework and improve their lives, according to a new study released Thursday, March 25. The study was paid for by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and conducted by the University of Washington Information School. Study researchers were intrigued to find that people across all age and ethnic groups used library computers, said Michael Crandall, one of the principal authors of the study, from the University of Washington Information School.

Chapter Closes on 2010 Great Michigan Read

Within the next two weeks, the Michigan Humanities Council will announce the guest authors at the 2010 Michigan Author Homecoming. The event will be held on May 18 in East Lansing and on May 20 in Marquette. It marks the end of the 2009-2010 Great Michigan Read, a book club for the entire state. With a statewide focus on a single book – Stealing Buddha’s Dinner by Bich Minh Nguyen (pronounced bit-min-win) – it encouraged Michiganians to learn more about their state, their history, and the multiplicity of their society.

Online registration for both venues will be required; seating will be limited. Registration will be accessible via the Michigan Humanities Council website.

Watch the Michigan Humanities Council website for more information.