Seniors

Emancipation Proclamation 150th Anniversary

President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863. It declared "that all persons held as slaves" within the rebellious states "are, and henceforward shall be free." Every advance of Union troops into the Confederacy expanded former slaves' freedom. Additionally, the Proclamation allowed black men into the military, and by the end of the Civil War almost 200,000 black soldiers and sailors had joined and fought for the Union cause.

Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation: the end of slavery in America by Allen C. Guelzo

Abraham Lincoln and the road to emancipation, 1861-1865 by William K. Klingaman

Lunch & a Book January 2013

On Thursday, January 10 at Noon we will be discussing:

The shadow of the wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafón — Barcelona, 1945 — just after the war, Daniel awakes on his eleventh birthday to find that he can no longer remember his mother's face. To console him, Daniel's widowed father, an antiquarian book dealer, initiates him into the secret of the Cemetery of Forgotten Books, a repository for books forgotten by the world, waiting for someone who will care about them again. Daniel's father coaxes him to choose a volume from the spiraling labyrinth of shelves, one that, it is said, will have a special meaning for him. And Daniel so loves the novel he selects, The Shadow of the Wind by Julian Carax, that he sets out to find the rest of Carax's work. To his shock, he discovers that someone has been systematically destroying every copy of every book this author has written. In fact, he may have the last one in existence. Before Daniel knows it his seemingly innocent quest has opened a door into one of Barcelona's darkest secrets, an epic story of murder, magic, madness and doomed love.

Help for eReader Users

So, you just got an eReader and now you need help figuring out how to use it.

eBook Users Group

Saturday, January 5, 2:00-3:00 PM or Tuesday, January 29, 7:00-8:30 PM. For experienced users or old pros. Drop in and share tips and tricks and learn how to use your eBook in an informal environment.

eBook Basics

Tuesday, January 8, 7:00-8:30 PM. Learn how to check out free library eBooks and read them on your Kindle, Nook or other device. Watch a live demo and try out a few different eReaders. Registration required.

How to Download Library eBooks to your Kindle

Wednesday, January 16, 10:00-11:30 AM. Kindle users, learn how to get the most out of your device, download free library books and more. Bring your Amazon account info. Registration required.

If you can't make it to a class, visit our eBooks page to see tips and instructional videos online. Or just stop it the library and ask at the Help Desk.

Year 2012 Top Non-Fiction Books Picks

Our favorite reads this year from the Adult and Children/Tweens/Teens Librarians:

Behind the beautiful forevers by Katherine Boo

We've got a job: the 1963 Birmingham Children's March by Cynthia Levinson

The righteous mind: why good people are divided by politics and religion by Jonathan Haidt

Quiet: the power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking by Susan Cain

Paris: a love story: a memoir by Kati Marton

A Jazzy Christmas 2012

I love Christmas music, but this year it's the melodies I want to hear. If you need more, CPL's Jazz Music Library database has over 200 Christmas albums available to CPL cardholders. Some of my favorite CDs are:

Peace by Jim Brickman

Homecoming by Jim Brickman

December by George Winston

A Winter's solstice

Celtic Christmas II: a Windham Hill collection

A Charlie Brown Christmas by Vince Guaraldi Trio

Remembering Christmas by David Benoit

Year 2012 Top Fiction Picks

Our favorite reads this year from the Adult and Children/Tweens/Teens Librarians:

The age of miracles: a novel by Karen Thompson Walker

The art forger: a novel by B.A. Shapiro

The dog stars by Peter Heller

Before I go to sleep: a novel by S.J. Watson

City of thieves: a novel by David Benioff

Every day by David Levithan

I Spy

The recent film Argo  starring Ben Affleck tells the true but improbable story of a covert operation to save six Americans hiding in the Canadian Embassy during the 1979 Iran Hostage Crisis. The history of espionage is filled with many such hard to believe tales and the Library's collection has many great titles to pick from.

Double cross: the true story of the D-day spies by Ben Macintyre — What did a Polish patriot, a Peruvian party girl, a Serbian playboy, an eccentric Spanish chicken farmer, and a volatile dog-loving Frenchwoman have in common? These five spies formed the nucleus of the Double Cross system which tricked the Nazis into keeping an entire army waiting for a fake invasion, thus assuring the Allied success on D-Day.

Wild Bill Donovan: the spymaster who created the OSS and modern American espionage by Douglas C. Waller — A fascinating biography of the father of today's CIA.

2012 National Film Registry Inductees

The National Film Registry of The Library of Congress has just announced its list of inductees for 2012. Established in 1989, the films are selected for their enduring importance to United States culture. For a history of the Film Registry you can watch the fascinating documentary These amazing shadows: the movies that made America. Titles available in the Libary's collections can be found below. The entire list — complete with film history — can be found here.

3:10 to Yuma [videodisc] — Starring Glenn Ford and Van Heflin (1957)

Anatomy of a murder [videodisc] by Columbia; Otto Preminger presents — Starring James Stwart, Lee Remick, Ben Gazzara (1959)

History at the Movies

This year has seen several new films based or inspired on historical figures and events. Lincoln, Hitchcock, On the Road, Argo, and Hyde Park on Hudson are all either in theatres now — or soon will be. If you want to be an educated viewer try one of the titles below:

Team of rivals: the political genius of Abraham Lincoln by Doris Kearns Goodwin

Rise to greatness: Abraham Lincoln and America's most perilous year by David Von Drehle

Our Lincoln: new perspectives on Lincoln and his world by edited by Eric Foner

Spellbound by beauty: Alfred Hitchcock and his leading ladies by Donald Spoto

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