Seniors

Maybe you missed these first time around?

Spiraled by Kendra Elliot

FBI Special Agent Ava McLane solves crimes; she doesn't witness them. When she's trapped in a mall without her weapon as a shooter picks off victims, she hides with a wounded teen and prays for her survival. But that's only the beginning... An epidemic of mass shootings has swept across Oregon. The young shooters terrify the public, committing random murders before taking their own lives. The task force assembled to solve the case--which includes Ava's boyfriend, detective Mason Callahan--remains stumped. And on top of this chaos, Ava's troubled twin sister reappears, throwing Ava's already-tumultuous life into a tailspin. An old-fashioned cop with a strong sense of duty, Mason struggles to find the cause of the shootings as workaholic Ava spins ever closer to breaking down. But can one detective save the lives of countless innocents--and prevent the woman he loves from going over the edge?.

A ring of truth by Michelle Cox

In this second book of the series, Henrietta and Clive delightfully rewrite Pride and Prejudice --with a hint of mystery! Newly engaged, Clive and Henrietta now begin the difficult task of meeting each other's family. "Difficult" because Clive has neglected to tell Henrietta that he is in fact the heir to the Howard estate and fortune, and Henrietta has just discovered that her mother has been hiding secrets about her past as well. When Clive brings Henrietta to the family estate to meet his parents, they are less than enthused about his impoverished intended. Left alone in this extravagant new world when Clive returns to the city, Henrietta finds herself more at home with the servants than his family, much to the disapproval of Mrs. Howard--and soon gets caught up in the disappearance of an elderly servant's ring, not realizing that in doing so she has become part of a bigger, darker plot. As Clive and Henrietta attempt to discover the truth in the two very different worlds unraveling around them, they both begin to wonder: Are they meant for each other after all?

On the road this month?   National Institute on Aging's Go4Life suggests travelers:

Pack your fitness clothes. Be prepared. Take your sneakers or walking shoes, exercise clothing, and bathing suit. If you’re taking your laptop, you might also include your favorite exercise DVD.

Stop along the way. If you’re traveling by car, take frequent breaks; get out and stretch or walk around. Not only will it help you feel better, it will help you stay more alert while driving. If you’re flying, walk around the airport while waiting for your flight.

Stick to your routine as much as possible. Being active is one of the most important things you can do each day. If you’re a morning person, exercise before going out for the day. Work out at lunch time. Or, if your day is too hectic, unwind with a workout in the afternoon or early evening.

...and take along a good read.

A loving and hilarious--if occasionally spiky--valentine to Bill Bryson's adopted country, Great Britain. Prepare for total joy and multiple episodes of unseemly laughter. Twenty years ago, Bill Bryson went on a trip around Britain to discover and celebrate that green and pleasant land. The result was Notes from a Small Island, a true classic and one of the bestselling travel books ever written. Now he has traveled about Britain again, by bus and train and rental car and on foot, to see what has changed--and what hasn't. Following (but not too closely) a route he dubs the Bryson Line, from Bognor Regis in the south to Cape Wrath in the north, by way of places few travelers ever get to at all, Bryson rediscovers the wondrously beautiful, magnificently eccentric, endearingly singular country that he both celebrates and, when called for, twits. With his matchless instinct for the funniest and quirkiest and his unerring eye for the idiotic, the bewildering, the appealing, and the ridiculous, he offers acute and perceptive insights into all that is best and worst about Britain today. Nothing is more entertaining than Bill Bryson on the road--and on a tear. The Road to Little Dribbling reaffirms his stature as a master of the travel narrative--and a really, really funny guy. From the Hardcover edition.

Two Centuries After James Cook's Epic Voyages of Discovery, Tony Horwitz takes readers on a wild ride across hemispheres and centuries to recapture the captain's adventures and explore his embattled legacy in today's Pacific. Horwitz, a Pulitzer Prize -- winning journalist, works as a sailor aboard a replica of Cook's ship, meets island kings and beauty queens, and carouses the South Seas with a hilarious and disgraceful travel companion, an Aussie named Roger. He also creates a brilliant portrait of Cook: an impoverished farm boy who became the greatest navigator in British history and forever changed the lands he touched. Poignant, probing, antic, and exhilarating, Blue Latitudes brings to life a man who helped create the global village we inhabit today. Book jacket.
 

Boston's massacre by Eric Hinderaker

On the night of March 5, 1770, British soldiers fired into a crowd gathered in front of Boston's Custom House, killing five people. Denounced as an act of unprovoked violence and villainy, the event that came to be known as the Boston Massacre is one of the most familiar incidents in American history, yet one of the least understood. Eric Hinderaker revisits this dramatic episode, examining in forensic detail the facts of that fateful night, the competing narratives that molded public perceptions at the time, and the long campaign afterward to transform the tragedy into a touchstone of American identity.

Films can transport us to another time, another place--that's the wonder of film.  

"No art form is as instantly and continuously gratifying as film. When the house lights go down and the lion roars, we settle in to be shocked, frightened, elated, moved, and thrilled. We expect magic. While we're being exhilarated and terrified, our minds are also processing data of all sorts--visual, linguistic, auditory, spatial--to collaborate in the construction of meaning. Thomas C. Foster's Reading the Silver Screen will show movie buffs, students of film, and even aspiring screenwriters and directors how to transition from merely being viewers to becoming accomplished readers of this great medium. Beginning with the grammar of film, Foster demonstrates how every art form has a grammar, a set of practices and if-then propositions that amount to rules. He goes on to explain how the language of film enables movies to communicate the purpose behind their stories and the messages they are striving to convey to audiences by following and occasionally breaking these rules. In Reading the Silver Screen, readers will gain the expertise and confidence to glean all they can from the movies they love,"--Amazon.com.

Whether we are trying to impress a date after an art-house film screening or discussing Oscar nominations with friends, we all need ways to watch and talk about movies. But with so much variety between an Alfred Hitchcock thriller and a Nora Ephron romantic comedy, how can everyday viewers determine what makes a good movie? In Talking Pictures, veteran film critic Ann Hornaday walks us through the production of a typical movie-from writing the script and casting to the final sound edit-and explains how to evaluate each piece of the process. How do we know if a film is well-written, above and beyond snappy dialogue? What constitutes a great screen performance? What goes into praiseworthy cinematography, editing, and sound design? And what does a director really do? Full of engaging anecdotes and interviews with actors and filmmakers, Talking Pictures will help us see movies in a whole new light-not just as fans, but as film critics in our own right.

July 1, 1867. The Constitution Act, 1867 is enacted,  uniting the three separate colonies of the Province of Canada, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick into a single Dominion within the British Empire called Canada.

The Constitution : an introduction by Michael Stokes Paulsen

July 2, 1788. The United States Constitution was ratified.

July 2, 1881. President James A. Garfield was shot as he entered a railway station in Washington, D.C. He died on September 19.

Canada Day celebrates the 1867 enactment of the Constitution Act which united the three colonies of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and the Province of Canada (Ontario and Quebec) into a single country. In honor of our northern neighbor read about some of her most illustrious native sons and daughters, past and present. For information on the history of Canada you can check here. For more noteworthy Canadians check here.

A dual portrait of the irrepressible orphan Anne of Green Gables and her creator covers such topics as the death of Montgomery's mother, her life on Prince Edward Island, and the inspiration for the "e" at the end of Anne's name..

When a typical American family takes a cross-country vacation, it can only mean one thing total disaster!.

While on vacation, a just-divorced writer buys a villa in Tuscany on a whim, hoping it will be the start of a change for the better in her life. Along the way she finds that sometimes what seems like a mistake is really a blessing.

The story of a witty but lonely secretary who takes a vacation in Venice, hoping to fall in love. She does - with a very handsome but very married Italian man.

New Digital Magazine App Available: RBdigital

RBdigital is bringing new and exciting upgrades to your experience. Starting Tuesday, June 27 accessing digital magazines with your library card will be streamlined with a new app and improved reading experience.

If you are new to our digital magazines service, click HERE to learn more about how to experience your favorite magazines on your computer, tablet or smartphone with the RBdigital app!

*Users of the Zinio for Libraries app will be able to continue using this app through the summer, after which it will eventually cease to be available. The Zinio for Libraries app will begin user notification about this change starting the week of July 10th. 

 

 

 

 

 

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