Seniors

Hunters of the Night: Birds of Prey

It’s all about survival! On Saturday, April 25 at 2:00-3:00PM, engaging raptors including an owl, falcon and EAGLE, will visit the Community Room to demonstrate and model their amazing survival characteristics and techniques. Join our friend from the Leslie Science and Nature Center as they present a hands-on exploration of feathers, skulls, and other bird parts and provide a stimulating introduction to these birds of prey. Help us round out our Earth Week celebrations by appreciating the beauty of these Hunters of the Sky!

[bald eagle by Eric Begin is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0]

Holocaust Remembrance Day: Docu Watch – "Never a Bystander"

Join us in watching this short documentary film titled Never A Bystander, featuring an inspiring Holocaust survivor, Irene Butter, who shows viewers how empowered choices — forgiveness included — enables lives of joy, purpose, and compassion. This film was filmed partially at Discovery Middle school in Canton.  Both the films subject, Irene Butter and the film’s director, Evelyn Neuhaus, will be in attendance for an engaging Q&A. All ages welcome on Wednesday, April 15 from 7:00-8:00 PM.

It Was 50 Years Ago Today ...

To learn about some of the historic events of 1965 check out some of these resources from the Library's collection:

The eve of destruction: how 1965 transformed America by James T. Patterson

1965: the most revolutionary year in music by Andrew Grant Jackson

We were soldiers once— and young: Ia Drang, the battle that changed the war in Vietnam by Harold G. Moore and Joseph L. Galloway

Tomorrow-land: the 1964-65 World's Fair and the transformation of America by Joseph Tirella

Louise Erdrich Wins Library of Congress Prize

On September 5, 2015 Louise Erdrich will receive the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction during the Library of Congress National Book Festival. Ms. Erdrich has won the National Book Award for The Round House and the National Book Critics Award for Love Medicine.  She was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize for The Plague Of Doves

Even More Biographies for Women's History Month

Ambition and desire: the dangerous life of Josephine Bonaparte by Kate Williams

 

 

The woman I wanted to be by Diane von Furstenberg

 

 

 

Eleanor of Aquitaine: the mother queen of the Middle Ages by Desmond Seward

 

 

 

The woman who would be king by Kara Cooney

 

 

 

Pioneer girl: the annotated autobiography by Laura Ingalls Wilder ; Pamela Smith Hill, editor

 

 

 

Look What's In Large Print: History

“To me, history ought to be a source of pleasure. It isn't just part of our civic responsibility. To me, it's an enlargement of the experience of being alive, just the way literature or art or music is."

― David McCullough[The Title Always Comes Last; NEH 2003 Jefferson Lecturer interview profile]

More Biographies for Women's History Month

New Zinio App Available

Zinio for Libraries is bringing new and exciting upgrades to your experience. Starting Tuesday, March 10 accessing digital magazines with your library card will be streamlined with a new App and improved reading experience.

  • Easier browser-based reading on your PC or Mac
  • Single account for RBdigital reading list AND app
  • New Zinio for Libraries app makes it easier to find your reading list

New directions will be added to our emedia page soon!

...and coming this spring/summer:

  • Browser-based reading for mobile devices
  • Improved access for Kindle Fire users

Women in War

In honor of Women's History Month read about some of the heroic women who have served their country in various ways throughout our history:

Amelia Earhart's daughters: the wild and glorious story of American women aviators from World War II to the dawn of the space age by Leslie Haynsworth and David Toomey

American women in World War I: they also served by Lettie Gavin

Cast no shadows: the life of the American spy who changed the course of World War II by Mary S. Lovell

Florence Nightingale: the making of an icon by Mark Bostridge

Selma to Montgomery, March 7-25, 1965

Three marches in 1965, from  Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, were part of the Selma Voting Rights Movement and led to the passage that year of the Voting Rights Act, considered a landmark federal achievement of the Civil Rights Movement.

Across that bridge: life lessons and a vision for change by John Lewis ; with Brenda Jones

Controversy and hope: the civil rights photographs of James Karales by Julian Cox with Rebekah Jacob and Monica Karales ; foreword by Andrew Young

Eyes on the prize: America's civil rights years, 1954- 1965 by Juan Williams, with the Eyes on the prize production team ; introduction by Julian Bond

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