Seniors

Montag, a regimented fireman in charge of burning the forbidden volumes, meets a revolutionary school teacher who dares to read. Suddenly he finds himself a hunted fugitive, forced to choose not only between two women, but between personal safety and intellectual freedom.

Set against the futuristic landscape of totalitarian Britain, this is the story of a young working-class woman, Evey, who is rescued from a life-and-death situation by a masked man known only as 'V.' Incomparably charismatic and ferociously skilled in the art of combat and deception, 'V' ignites a revolution when he urges his fellow citizens to rise up against tyranny and oppression.

An insane general triggers a path to nuclear holocaust that a war room full of politicians and generals frantically try to stop.

A news reporter, along with seven others, witnesses the assassination of a political candidate. When the other seven die in "accidents", the newsman begins to doubt the official position, i.e that a lone madman was responsible for the crime..

Canton Seniors Book Discussion: April 27, 2017

Please join the Canton Seniors Book Discussion Group to discuss: 

Killing Jesus : a history by Bill O'Reilly

Millions of readers have thrilled to bestselling authors Bill O'Reilly and historian Martin Dugard's Killing Kennedy and Killing Lincoln, page-turning works of nonfiction that have changed the way we read history. Now the anchor of The O'Reilly Factor details the events leading up to the murder of the most influential man in history: Jesus of Nazareth. Nearly two thousand years after this beloved and controversial young revolutionary was brutally killed by Roman soldiers, more than 2.2 billion human beings attempt to follow his teachings and believe he is God. Killing Jesus will take readers inside Jesus's life, recounting the seismic political and historical events that made his death inevitable-- and changed the world forever.

Upcoming sessions

There are no upcoming sessions available.

Please join the Canton Seniors Book Discussion as we discuss:

The excellent Lombards by Jane Hamilton
Also available in: large print

Mary Frances "Frankie" Lombard is fiercely in love with her family's sprawling apple orchard and the tangled web of family members who inhabit it. Content to spend her days planning capers with her brother William, competing with her brainy cousin Amanda, and expertly tending the orchard with her father, Frankie desires nothing more than for the rhythm of life to continue undisturbed. But she cannot help being haunted by the historical fact that some family members end up staying on the farm and others must leave. Change is inevitable, and threats of urbanization, disinheritance, and college applications shake the foundation of Frankie's roots. As Frankie is forced to shed her childhood fantasies and face the possibility of losing the idyllic future she had envisioned for her family, she must decide whether loving something means clinging tightly or letting go.

The First Amendment to the Constitution reads as follows:

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances."

On December 15, 1791 the Bill of Rights (the first ten amendments to the Constitution) was ratified by Virginia, thus meeting the requirement of being ratified by three-fourths of the state legislatures. The freedom of the press is essential to democracy.  In the words of President Barack Obama: "Journalists give all of us as citizens the chance to know the truth about our countries, ourselves, our governments. That makes us better, it makes us stronger, it gives voice to the voiceless,  it exposes injustice, and holds leaders like me accountable."

Learn more about this essential American right and it's importance in America's history from some the following resources in the Library's collection.

20 More Great Reads for Black History Month

Death of a king: the real story of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s final year by Tavis Smiley with David Ritz

 

 

 

 

 

Children of fire: a history of African Americans by Thomas C. Holt

 

 

 

 

Say it loud: great speeches on civil rights and African American identity by edited by Catherine Ellis and Stephen Drury Smith

 

Stokely: a life by Peniel E. Joseph

 

 

 

 

Across that bridge: life lessons and a vision for change by John Lewis ; with Brenda Jones

 

 

 

 

Washington's "Farewell"  was published at the end of his second term and was reprinted in newspapers across the country. The President began the letter during his first term intending to retire but was persuaded by Hamilton and Jefferson to run for a second. By the end of that term he was the object of scurrilous press attacks and alarmed by the growing partisan bitterness. Fearful for the country's future, Washington pled with his countrymen to resist hyper-partisanship and foreign alliances.

Frederick Douglass in Brooklyn by Frederick Douglass

With all of the information we have access to, it is sometimes hard to understand where everyone is coming from. Canton Public Library has some resources to help you work through complicated issues.

If you are interested in comparative essays about current events, check out Opposing Viewpoints in Context. This is a good resource if you are seeking articles in which authors use fact-based arguments to make a case for a certain side of a debate and if you would like to compare arguments. This is good for exploring positions on topics like gun control, recycling, and net neutrality.

If you are looking for academic research on a certain topic, for example the benefits of public libraries, a database like Academic OneFile may be good for you. This database has a range of articles published by professionals in their fields. This is an excellent resource for people seeking foundational information about a specific topic. 

For topics that have been covered by newspapers such as historical events, General OneFile is a wonderful resource. For example, if you are curious about the emergency manager's decisions in Detroit, General OneFile will pull newspaper articles from the time period you are researching so you can better understand the historical moment.

 

Happy researching!

My life, my love, my legacy by Coretta Scott King

Two extraordinary women-Coretta Scott King, wife of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Dr. Betty Shabazz, wife of Malcolm X-come to life in this film. After their husbands' tragic assassinations, they developed a unique friendship spanning three decades as they carried on the Civil Rights movement while supporting their families as single mothers. Through their strength and dignity, they became role models for millions of women.

Celebrating the spirituality, courage, and intellectual achievements of African Americans, Autobiography of a People traces the history of the African American experience - from the Middle Passage to Emancipation, from the Civil War to Vietnam, from the Little Rock Nine to the Million Man March - by telling the story in the words of the men and women who lived it.

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