Seniors

In celebration of National Women's History Month, five biographies of women who have made their mark.

Shirley Jones is an American film legend of the first order, having starred in Oklahoma!, Carousel, and The Music Man, as well as playing her Oscar-winning role as a prostitute in Elmer Gantry long before The Partridge Family. On that iconic show, she portrayed the epitome of American motherhood, a symbol to generations of families in the 1970s, and she remains a cult icon today.But for those who only think of Shirley as the prim and proper Marian the librarian or the chaste and demure Mrs. Partridge, a massive surprise is in store. Here, in this candid memoir, the real flesh-and-blood Shirley Jones is revealed at last in this hilarious and heartwarming, shocking and intimate memoir.

Arizona Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords and her husband, astronaut Mark Kelly, were thrust into the world spotlight when Gabby miraculously survived an assassination attempt. Now, as her health continues to improve, the couple shares their story. Told in Mark's voice and from Gabby's heart, this is an unflinching look at the challenges of brain injury, the responsibilities that fall to a loving spouse, and the healing power of deeply shared love and courage.

Shortly after 9/11, Los Angeles Times journalist Megan K. Stack was thrust into Afghanistan and Pakistan, where she dodged gunmen and prodded warlords for information. From there, she traveled to war-ravaged Iraq, Lebanon and other countries scarred by violence. Every Man in This Village is a Liar is Megan K. Stack's electrifying account of what she saw in the combat zones and beyond. She relates her initial wild excitement and her slow disillusionment. She reports from under bombardment in Lebanon; records the raw pain of suicide bombings in Israel and Iraq; and marks the deaths and disappearances of those she has interviewed. Beautiful, savage, and unsettling, this is an unforgettable narrative about the wars of the 21st century - a shattering account from a reporter on the front lines.

Pick up a copy of Emily St. John Mandel's Station Eleven at the library.  Join in one of the discussions. The Canton Seniors Book Discussion group will be discussing Station Eleven in April and the Adult Contemporary Book Discussion group in November.

Station eleven by Emily St. John Mandel
Also available in: e-book | audiobook | e-audiobook

One snowy night a famous Hollywood actor slumps over and dies onstage during a production of King Lear. Hours later, the world as we know it begins to dissolve. Moving back and forth in time-from the actor's early days as a film star to fifteen years in the future, when a theater troupe known as the Traveling Symphony roams the wasteland of what remains-this suspenseful, elegiac, spellbinding novel charts the strange twists of fate that connect five people: the actor, the man who tried to save him, the actor's first wife, his oldest friend, and a young actress with the Traveling Symphony, caught in the cross-hairs of a dangerous self-proclaimed prophet.

The  Agatha Christie Awards nominees for best mysteries published in 2015 reflect a wide range of authors, publishers, styles, and themes. In the contemporary category, award-winning favorites Margaret Maron, Louise Penny, and Hank Phillipi Ryan share the honoree podium with newcomer Annette Dashofy and Catriona McPherson. The winners will be announced at Malice Domestic 28, which will be held April 29-May 1, 2016.  Check out what is available at Canton Public Library.

Best Contemporary Novel

Long upon the land by Margaret Maron
Also available in: e-book | audiobook | large print

On a quiet August morning, Judge Deborah Knott's father Kezzie makes a shocking discovery on a remote corner of his farm: the body of a man bludgeoned to death. Investigating this crime, Deborah's husband, Sheriff's Deputy Dwight Bryant, soon uncovers a long-simmering hostility between Kezzie and the slain man over a land dispute. The local newspaper implies that Deborah's family may have had something to do with the murder-and that Dwight is dragging his feet on the case. Meanwhile, Deborah is given a cigarette lighter that once belonged to her mother. The cryptic inscription inside rekindles Deborah's curiosity about her parents' past, and how they met. For years she has wondered how the daughter of a wealthy attorney could have married a widowed, semi-illiterate bootlegger, and this time she's determined to find the answer. But why are Deborah's brothers so reluctant to talk about the dead man? Is the murder linked to Kezzie's illegal whiskey business? And could his courtship of Deborah's mother have something to do with the bad blood between the two families? Despite Deborah's promise not to interfere in Dwight's work, she cannot stop herself from doing everything she can to help clear her brothers and her father from suspicion.

The child garden : a novel by Catriona McPherson

Eden was its name. "An alternative school for happy children." But it closed in disgrace after a student's suicide. Now it's a care home, the grounds neglected and overgrown. Gloria Harkness is its only neighbor, staying close to her son who lives in the home, lighting up her life and breaking her heart each day. When a childhood friend turns up at her door, Gloria doesn't hesitate before asking him in. He claims a girl from Eden is stalking him and has goaded him into meeting near the site of the suicide. Only then, the dead begin to speak--it was murder, they say. Gloria is in over her head before she can help it. Her loneliness, her loyalty, and her all-consuming love for her son lead her into the heart of a dark secret that threatens everything she lives for. 

"Each time a girl opens a book and reads a womanless history, she learns she is worth less."   ~ Myra Pollack Sadker.  March is National Women's History Month.    History helps us learn who we are, but when we don’t know our own history, our power and dreams are immediately diminished.  Throughout the centuries, women have been strong contributors to our world, but  received no written recognition for their accomplishments.  

West with the Night by Beryl Markham
Also available in: e-audiobook

"West with the Night" is the story of Beryl Markham--aviator, racehorse trainer, beauty--and her life in the Kenya of the 1920s and '30s.  During the pioneer days of aviation, she became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic from east to west.

Also available in: e-book

A lively and provocative double biography of first cousins Eleanor Roosevelt and Alice Roosevelt Longworth, two extraordinary women whose tangled lives provide a sweeping look at the twentieth century. When Theodore Roosevelt became president in 1901, his beautiful and flamboyant daughter was transformed into "Princess Alice," arguably the century's first global celebrity. Thirty-two years later, her first cousin Eleanor moved into the White House as First Lady. Born eight months and twenty blocks apart from each other in New York City, Eleanor and Alice spent a large part of their childhoods together and were far more alike than most historians acknowledge. But their politics and temperaments couldn't have been more distinct. Do-gooder Eleanor was committed to social justice but hated the limelight; acid-tongued Alice, who became the wife of philandering Republican congressman Nicholas Longworth, was an opponent of big government who gained notoriety for her cutting remarks (she famously quipped that dour President Coolidge "looked like he was weaned on a pickle"). While Eleanor revolutionized the role of First Lady with her outspoken passion for human rights, Alice made the most of her insider connections to influence politics, including doing as much to defeat the League of Nations as anyone in elective office. 

"Inspired by the critically acclaimed Netflix documentary What Happened, Miss Simone?, an intimate and vivid look at the legendary life of Nina Simone, the classically trained pianist who evolved into a chart-topping chanteuse and committed civil rights activist. From music journalist and former Spin and Vibe editor-in-chief Alan Light comes a biography of incandescent soul singer and Black Power icon Nina Simone, one of the most influential, provocative, and least understood artists of our time. Drawn from a trove of rare archival footage, audio recordings and interviews (including Simone's remarkable private diaries), this nuanced examination of Nina Simone's life highlights her musical inventiveness and unwavering quest for equality, while laying bare the personal demons that plagued her from the time of her Jim Crow childhood in North Carolina to her self-imposed exile in Liberia and Paris later in life. Harnessing the singular voice of Miss Simone herself and incorporating candid reflections from those who knew her best, including her only daughter, Light brings us face to face with a legend, examining the very public persona and very private struggles of one of our greatest artists"--.

Have you hit a snag with your ereader or mobile device?  Patrons in need of one-on-one assistance can come in on Fridays from 10:00-11:00 AM to receive basic or extended help with borrowing or downloading books, movies and more with your Canton Public Library card.  No registration required, just drop in!

Hooray for Old Hollywood!

Long before Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence, Scarlett Johansson, and Joseph Gordon-Levitt were big names in the movies, actors such as Chaplin, Dietrich, Bogart, and Gable were considered the ultimate in star power. Read about some of the great actors and actresses who may be gone, but will certainly not be forgotten.

Robert Mitchum: "baby, I don't care" by Lee Server

Dark lover: the life and death of Rudolph Valentino by Emily W. Leider

Bogart by A.M. Sperber and Eric Lax

Umberto Eco, the Italian author and scholar most know for his 1980 book turned movie "The Name of the Rose," passed away at the age of 84 in Milan, Italy on February 19th, 2016. We have a number of his fiction and nonfiction titles available as well as the 1986 film adaptation starring Sean Connery.

Investigating the deaths of two monks, a visiting brother discovers a secret library containing rare books considered lost to the world and dangerous to the Catholic faith.

The name of the rose by Umberto Eco
The Prague cemetery by Umberto Eco

Simone Simonini-- a secret agent and killer filled with hate-- weaves together the problems of tumultuous nineteenth-century Europe into vast conspiracies, and meanwhile he realizes that he is suffering from a split personality, calling himself both a captain and a priest. (Also available in audiobook format)

If you or someone you know needs assistance with basic computer skills, including Internet use and setting up an email account, please stop in to CPL's Internet Lab between 9:00 AM and 11:00 AM on Saturday, March 12 for our drop-in skills lab. We will have guided activities for practice with mouse skills, copying/pasting, and more.  A librarian will be on hand to answer any questions you may have or direct you to activities and tutorials to help build basic computer skills.

 

*This lab is restricted to basic computer skills, as listed above. Staff will not be able to assist with the diagnosis or repair of computer equipment, or with online financial transactions.

 

 

This post contains suggestions for how to earn your You Choose: Super Bookworm badge.
Learn more and earn badges on the Connect Your Summer page.

Love the classics? Try a modern retelling of one of your favorites. 

Frankenstein

A monster's notes by Laurie Sheck

Even More Movies for Black History Month

Akeelah and the bee [videodisc] by Lionsgate, 2929 Productions and Starbucks Entertainment present ; an Out of the Blue Entertainment and Reactor Films production ; in association with Cinema Gypsy Productions, Inc. ; produced by Nancy Hult Ganis, Sid Ganis, Laurence Fishburne, Michael Romersa, Danny Llewelyn ; written and directed by Doug Atchison

 

 

Crooklyn [videodisc] by a Spike Lee joint ; Universal Pictures presents a 40 Acres and a Mule Filmworks production in association with Child Hoods Productions

 

 

 

 

Cry freedom [videodisc] Universal Pictures presents a March Arch production

 

 

 

 

The express [videodisc]: the Ernie Davis story by produced by John Davis ; written by Charles Leavitt ; directed by Gary Fleder

 

 

 

 

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