Kids

Theodor Seuss Geisel Award

Hi there Summer Readers! I hope you guys are having a great time reading and having fun. Are you looking for an award-winning book to fulfill one of your activity spaces on your log? Try the Theodor Seuss Geisel Award! The ALA website describes the award by saying, "The Geisel Award is given annually to the author(s) and illustrator(s) of the most distinguished American book for beginning readers published in English in the United States during the preceding year." Just click here to be taken to the ALA website to see the list of Geisel Award winners and runners-up! The 2010 winner is Benny and Penny in the Big No-No by Geoffrey Hayes. Happy Reading!

Fishy Books

With books like these, who needs a Nemo movie?

A fishy story by text by Gail Donovan ; illustrations by David Austin Clar Studio

Hooray for fish! by Lucy Cousins

Professor Bumble and the monster of the deep by Daniel Napp ; translated by Hilary Schmitt-Thomas

There was an old lady who swallowed a trout by Teri Sloat ; illustrated by Reynold Ruffins

Rainbow Fish discovers the deep sea by Marcus Pfister

Michigan's Gray Wolves: Should People Be Allowed to Kill Them?

If wolves attack livestock or pets, do humans have the right to kill them, even if they're on the Endangered Species list? This long-standing debate has reached the states of Michigan and Wisconsin. Both states have requested permission from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to obtain permits allowing the killing of wolves, including gray wolves, which are protected under the federal Endangered Species Act. There are roughly 600 wolves in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. The FWS is accepting public comments on this issue through May 19. Email your comments to Regional Director Peter Fasbender at: permitsR3ES@fws.gov. For more information, check out FWS's web page.
You can learn more about the pros and cons of wolf killing by checking out the book Once a Wolf: How Wildlife Biologists Fought to Bring Back the Gray Wolf.

Holiday Handiwork

Wondering what gifts to buy for this gift-giving season? Well, why not make your own gifts like some celebrants of Kwanzaa do. You could make ornaments, dolls, treasure boxes or candle out of old jewelry, marbles, yarn, string or other small pieces you already have around. Here are some craft books to help you along.

All new crafts for Kwanzaa by Kathy Ross; illustrated by Sharon Lane Holm

Chinese New Year crafts by Karen E. Bledsoe

Hanukkah crafts by Karen E. Bledsoe; crafts prepared and illustrated by June Ponte

Christmas crafts by Fay Robinson; crafts prepared and illustrated by Margaret Frase

Holiday Reads

Hey kids, did you spend the day doing holiday shopping with the grown-ups? You probably need some down time after navigating through all those crowds at the stores! Come to the library and grab something (free!) to read and wind down. I'm feeling Christmas-y, so here are some of my favorite easy-to-read Christmas tales to get you in the spirit:

Arthur's Christmas cookies by words and pictures by Lillian Hoban

Aunt Eater's mystery Christmas by story and pictures by Doug Cushman

The Christmas penguin by Mary Packard; illustrated by Teri Weidner

Minnie and Moo: the night before Christmas by Denys Cazet

Of course, we have many, many more great Christmas books, so come visit us and stock up!

Steampunk?

Steampunk appears to be gaining steam… but what exactly is it? Well, here is a definition from Wikipedia: "Steampunk is a sub-genre of fantasy and speculative fiction that came into prominence in the 1980s and early 1990s. The term denotes works set in an era or world where steam power is still widely used—usually the 19th century, and often Victorian era England — but with prominent elements of either science fiction or fantasy, such as fictional technological inventions like those found in the works of H. G. Wells and Jules Verne, or real technological developments like the computer occurring at an earlier date. Other examples of steampunk contain alternate history-style presentations of "the path not taken" of such technology as dirigibles, analog computers, or digital mechanical computers (such as Charles Babbage's Analytical engine); these frequently are presented in an idealized light, or with a presumption of functionality." While many of the books are for teens or adults, Steampunk is now coming out for tween-age readers. It is one of those 'happenings' that crosses sexes, ages, and formats. No official subject heading exists yet for this genre, but here are a few titles to whet your appetite, pique your curiousity...whatever:

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