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We the People

The Obama Administration has launched a new website called We the People where ordinary citizens can petition the White House to take up any issue of importance to them. Participants must be 13 years or older and have an account on Once a petition is submitted, the creator must work to gather support. If a petition meets the 5,000 signature threshold in 30 days or less, the issue will be reviewed by the White House.

Check out the J400 Collection

Hey there! Do you get nouns and verbs confused? What are those pesky adverbs all about? Come and visit the J400 section of the Children's Non-fiction collection. We have lots of books and DVDs to help you learn all about different parts of speech and how to use them. See you there!

Terrarium Craft

Terrarium craft : create 50 magical, miniature worlds by Amy Bryant Aiello & Kate Bryant ; photography by Kate Baldwin — Terrariums are simple to make but they can bring so much magic to a space. This book has fifty ideas for terrariums in four themes: forest, beach, desert, and fantasy. Making a terrarium can be as easy as following the instructions provided here, or taking inspiration and doing your own thing. It can be a fun family activity, or a meditational endeavor for a solo crafter.

Magazine Express

As the Canton Public Library continues to deal with a declining budget, patrons are reminded the "magazine express" program has been discontinued.

Ruins of Detroit

The ruins of Detroit by Yves Marchand and Romain Meffre; with essays by Robert Polidori and Thomas J. Sugrue; [translations by Sébastien de Villèle] Over the past generation Detroit has suffered economically and its urban decay is now glaringly apparent. The authors have documented this disintegration, showcasing with amazing photograhs structures that were formerly a source of civic pride.

Neutrinos Traveling Faster Than Light?

The physics world is abuzz with news that a group of European physicists has clocked a burst of subatomic particles known as neutrinos breaking the speed of light that was calculated by Albert Einstein in 1905, according to the New York Times. Was Albert Einstein wrong to think that the speed of light was the ultimate speed? Does this mean that time-travel will become a possibility?

Neutrino by Frank Close

How to get library eBooks on the Amazon Kindle

KindleWatch this 4-minute video on How to get library eBooks on the Amazon® Kindle. It walks you through the entire process of browsing, checking out and getting a library eBooks for Kindle. It's fun and easy!

The Knitter's Year

The knitter's year : 52 make-in-a-week projects-- quick gifts and seasonal knits by Debbie Bliss ; photography by Penny Wincer — The projects in this book are categorized by season, and there are just enough of them that you can knit one a week throughout an entire year. They're also manageable projects that most knitters could expect to complete in a week or less. The items range from useful items like a pincushion and a pencil case to accents you can wear like a belt and a corsage. All the projects have a simple, refined style that can easily be embellished if desired.

Vintner's Book Discussion is October 18th

Register and join us for wine and a mystery book discussion on Tuesday, October 18th from 7:00-8:00 PM at Vintners Canton Winery. Drop by the Main Reference Desk to pick up a copy of this month's book:

The night inspector : a novel by Frederick Busch — William Bartholomew, a maimed veteran of the Civil War, returns from the battlefields to New York City a hardened man, bent on reversing his fortunes. This is a gripping portrait of a nation trying to heal from the ravages of war, of the desolation of a people searching for hope in a new age, and of one man's attempts at recapturing a lust for his own life.

Adult Contemporary Book Discussion October 17

Join us on Monday, October 17, in the Purple Room at 7:00 PM to discuss our book club selection, Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford. The story begins in Seattle where Henry Lee sees a crowd gathered outside a hotel that has been boarded up for decades. The new owner discovers the belongings of Japanese families left behind before they were sent to internment camps. The owner opens up a parasol and it takes Henry back to 1942 and his secret love.

Let's hear it for the Tigers!

We are rocking it baseball style here in the D! Our Detroit Tigers are on a roll. Let's hope they can carry this into the playoff season starting shortly. Have you got tickets yet? Until it's time for the next game, check out our great books and DVD's on the Detroit Tigers.

Kindle eBooks Now Available

Rejoice, Kindle users!
OverDrive, our library eBook Vendor, has just launched the long-awaited Kindle compatibility initiative. This means all Kindle users will be able to check out OverDrive eBooks and read them on either their Kindle device or other devices using the Kindle apps. When you check out a Kindle book, the "Get for Kindle" link will prompt you to login to your Amazon account. Specific help page is available to walk you through the process.

Log in to our OverDrive eBook site with your CPL card number to get started.

Follow the Money

Do you ever wonder where all of your tax dollars are being spent? Do you need to know what the country's national debt is — and who's holding it? Or do you just want to know what campaign donations are being received by your legislators — and from whom? The answers to all of these burning questions can be found by a few clicks of your browser. is a searchable database of all federal contracts, including the amount of the award and who's receiving it. For complete up to the minute information on the national debt, the U.S. Treasury site has it all. And to follow your legislators' campaign funds there are several places to check.

Pictures of Resistance… in the Hatcher Library Gallery

September 6–November 27
Pictures of Resistance: The Wartime Photographs of Jewish Partisan Faye Schulman Exhibit

The lives of partisans depended on their ability to remain unseen, undocumented and unidentifiable. But one fighter, Faye Schulman, had a camera. Schulman’s rare collection of images captures the camaraderie, horror and loss, bravery and triumph of the rag-tag, tough partisans—some Jewish, some not—who fought the Germans and their collaborators.

This exhibit is sponsored by the University Library and the Frankel Center for Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan. Additional events will be held at the Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library, Gallery in Room 100 (use Diag entrance) at 913 S. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI.

Public parking is available in the structure at 650 S. Forest, just south of S. University. Free and open to the public

Death of the Book—and Other Good News

Thursday, October 6, 4:00-5:30pm
Lecture at Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library, Gallery (use Diag entrance)
913 S. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI

According to Dan Okrent, "The digital revolution has upended the roles of bookstores, libraries, publishers, and, of course, readers. It’s the biggest change in the world of words since Gutenberg, and may turn out to be just as beneficial—or even more so." Daniel Okrent is best known as the first public editor at the New York Times, but he first spent more than 25 years in magazine and book publishing. He has written several books, including Great Fortune: The Epic of Rockefeller Center, which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in history. He also attended the University of Michigan and worked on the Michigan Daily.

Public parking is available in the structure at 650 S. Forest, just south of S. University. Free and open to the public

The Princess Curse

October 4, 4:00-5:30 PM
A talk with author Merrie Haskell Fuller

The princess curse by Merrie Haskell — Twelve princesses suffer from a puzzling—and downright silly—curse. Ridiculous though the curse may be, whoever breaks it will win a handsome reward. Sharp-witted Reveka, an herbalist’s apprentice, has little use for princesses, with their snooty attitudes and impractical clothing. She does, however, have use for the reward money that could buy her a position as a master herbalist.

The Man Who Never Died

September 22, 5:30-7:00 PM, A talk with author William M. Adler, Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery

The man who never died : the life, times, and legacy of Joe Hill, American labor icon by William M. Adler — Joe Hill was convicted of murder in Utah in 1914 and sentenced to death by firing squad. In the international controversy that ensued, many believed Hill was innocent but condemned for being a union man. Author William M. Adler spent four years investigating the case, and in a biography that reads like a murder mystery, argues convincingly for Hill’s innocence.

CPL Withdrawn Books Adventures

Our Adult Fiction Committee has been doing a great job of reviewing their collection and making room for new titles. Last week the withdraw cart was full of great titles but the condition of the books were gently used. What to do? Never fear — one of our volunteers, Pam Gillis, came to the rescue. She has been sending books to our troops in Afghanistan for their enjoyment and took a look at the cart of books and pulled over 75% of the titles to send.

The Age of Piracy

Theft is a problem endemic to human nature. But what if theft were a victimless crime? In the computer age, copying a file from a friend or from the web has become easy and widespread; and it is often criminal in nature. The following books give insight into whether this is a problem of enforcement, of intellectual property laws, or of both:

The pirate's dilemma : how youth culture is reinventing capitalism by Matt Mason

Downloading copyrighted stuff from the Internet : stealing or fair use? by Sherri Mabry Gordon